Are you familiar with these terms?

Discussion in 'High Definition' started by Hellbilly, Aug 3, 2011.

?

?

  1. Aliasing

    10 vote(s)
    40.0%
  2. Combing

    16 vote(s)
    64.0%
  3. Motion artifacts

    19 vote(s)
    76.0%
  4. Video noise

    19 vote(s)
    76.0%
  5. Grain

    25 vote(s)
    100.0%
  6. Edge enhancement / Jagged edges

    23 vote(s)
    92.0%
  7. Banding

    18 vote(s)
    72.0%
  8. Blocking

    15 vote(s)
    60.0%
  9. Haloing

    18 vote(s)
    72.0%
  10. other

    1 vote(s)
    4.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Hellbilly

    Hellbilly Active Member

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    and do you know what they mean, stand for, are?
    These keep popping up in reviews at Blu-ray.com and since they don't provide visual aids I can't even imagine what they are talking about most of the time. Though I am familiar with "grain".
     
  2. dave13

    dave13 Well-Known Member

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    correct me if i'm wrong, but isn't combing the effect created by interlaced transfers when they can't keep up with motion? And edge enhancement appears to be when someone digitally adds a small contrasting outline around an object in order to make it stand out more. when you do this, you obviously lose detail in the edge of the image, though, and it's not true to the original source, which i think is where the complaint comes from. this is just what i've gathered from seeing screen shots on sites like dvdbeaver. film grain is pretty commonly known, and i would suspect that video noise is something that might look like film grain at first, but isn't in fact a natural part of the film. most of those other terms, i have no idea. although some of them sound kind of self-explanatory, so i might know it if i saw it. aliasing, on the other hand, i'm not even sure how to pronounce.
     
  3. KamuiX

    KamuiX The Eighth Samurai

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    If I'm not wrong, I believe aliasing when it comes to film is when a texture shimmers. For instance, ever see a show where someone is wearing a really detailed shirt, with lots of lines or small shapes (generally squares) and when they move it shimmers? I think that's considered aliasing in film.

    Motion artifacts are when you can see digital blocking during high-motion scenes. Basically, the bitrate isn't high enough to handle the high motion. I'm guessing blocking may be just another term for artifacts, just when the picture is still.

    Combing is definitely for interlacing, and video noise is basically a form of static overlaying the picture. Sort of like what you'd see on a 4th or 5th gen dubbed VHS. I can't imagine them bringing up video noise on Blu-Ray's though, unless it's a really shitty upscale of a TV show or something. There are definitely instances of it on older TV shows released on DVD. Some of the early season of Married with Children suffer from it.

    The other terms I don't really know. I'm fairly certain I don't notice edge enhancement or haloing because my TV is only 40". I think these are problems that become more apparent as the TV size gets larger.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2011
  4. JGrendel

    JGrendel New Member

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    Yeah that sounds about right
     
  5. dickieduvet

    dickieduvet Member

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    All common terms that appear in a majority of pro Blu-Ray/DVD reviews. Universal should copyright the term Edge Enhancement as they apply it to all their Blu Transfers as well as DNR....Amateurs!
     
  6. SaxCatz

    SaxCatz New Member

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    +1 :lol:
     
  7. MorallySound

    MorallySound Mad Mutilator

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    Banding is when colours that are too close together (ie. gradients) don't translate properly because of the compression/bit rate.
     
  8. MorallySound

    MorallySound Mad Mutilator

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    Haloing is an effect of edge enhancement, where around the edges of objects/people it will appear almost like a faint "halo" or "glow".
     
  9. msw7

    msw7 Re-animated member

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    I never know what the hell 'other' means. :)

    I have to look up 'aliasing' almost every time - it never seems to stick in memory. The rest I have an easier time with, but I also do a lot of digital photography/processing, where I've seen many/all of these same terms.
     
  10. bigdaddyhorse

    bigdaddyhorse Detroit Hi-on

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    Heard of and knew all but Aliasing and that pesky other.

    With KamuiX's post, I know all of them now.
     
  11. X-human

    X-human I ate my keys

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    I'm guessing "blocking" refers to when the compression is set too low and you end up video that almost looks like a patchwork. Compression does not do the entire image as a whole. Instead it breaks it up into perfect bite sized squares or 'blocks.' It then looks at that block area of the picture and makes a simplified version of it. It then goes on to the next block. If your compression settings aren't right, what can happen is the blocks next to each other don't really blend all that well together. You can actually see where the compressor stopped one block and started another.

    On the flip side of that there are upconverters that know commons mistakes like that, look for them, and then smooth the edges of the blocks so that they blend together. This makes for a softer but less "blocky" image.
     

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