Camp Classics Contest

Discussion in 'Site News' started by rhett, Jun 9, 2007.

  1. rhett

    rhett Administrator

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    Everyone has at least one in their collection. A campy movie that takes itself so seriously you can't help but eat it up. In a little change of pace for HORRORDVDS.COM, all you have to do for this contest is tell us about it.

    What is your favorite camp classic?

    That's it. Respond to this thread, tell us your favorite, say a few words about it, and you'll be instantly entered into our contest. This is open to everyone, young, old, black, white, communist, Franco, whatever your denomination. Let's see how many posts we can get here, and hopefully we'll all get turned on to some B-movies we've never even heard before.

    So what are we playing for?

    1st Place Prize:
    Cult Camp Classics, Volume 3 box set
    The Hitcher t-shirt

    2nd Place Prize:
    Cult Camp Classics, Volume 3 box set

    3rd Place Prize:
    The Hitcher t-shirt

    The cut-off will be Friday, June 15th at midnight. All the entires will be put into a database, and three members will be randomly drawn.

    So let's get to the topic...what's your favorite camp classic?
     

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  2. Noto

    Noto Guest

    never before read... A horrorvds.com exclusive. My ode to...

    [​IMG][​IMG]
    by Shawn McLoughlin (aka Noto)

    Many films throughout time have advertised themselves to “have something for everyone.” Typically they advertise that they have action, adventure, romance, comedy, etc. Usually they either fail at one or more of these genres, or they lose sight of their overall objective. Steve De Jarnatt’s Cherry 2000 is interesting in that it did not openly market itself that way, even though that is exactly what it is, and succeeds very well at.

    The overloaded plot could have easily been played for more laughs than it actually was. When the central plot for the first quarter of the film is our hero’s quest to find a replacement for his sexdroid, you might expect the script to deteriorate to become lowbrow smut and contain crude sex jokes typical of numerous 80’s comedies. Thankfully, for the sake of the film, it never sinks that low. Instead, we realize that our hero is not simply looking for a vessel of sexual perversion; he is looking for love. His genuine love for Cherry, and the lengths that he goes to find her, is commendable, romantic and inspiring. By devoting himself to Cherry, he is not devoting himself to a robot, but instead to love itself and therefore secures the importance of the emotion. In a semi-post-apocalyptic future world where romance is insignificant, and casual sex requires a contract and legal representation, finding love anywhere would be a chore, or nearly impossible; even if everyone seems promiscuous by wearing what could be the most extreme selections from Jean-Paul Gauthier’s 20XX fall-season line. Sam (David Andrews) first finds it in his Cherry 2000, the fact that she is a robot isn’t the point; the point is that he found romance, and more importantly, that he was looking for it.

    All of that is shown within the first 15 minutes of the film, which includes a James Bond inspired title sequence that runs for part of that. Few films have said so much in such a short period of time, especially from a B-level movie such as this.

    At the point where E. Johnson (Melanie Griffith) enters the film, another element of sexism comes into play. Her role as a “tracker” (which seems to be part bounty hunter and part adventurer), is a dangerous job, and as expected, Griffith’s character has been hardened. She has become more masculine, and represses the femininity that she retains. This type of character has been done in countless other films, as has the dynamic played between the two leads here. But while their relationship is destined to reach the standard predictable end, getting there is made more interesting by having the object of the quest being a robotic female substitute. By using this as the device, instead of say, a trinket of some sort (see an Indiana Jones film) or an object needed to save the world/humanity (see The Fifth Element) the film is able to bounce around themes in record time and still come off sincere. Among the clichés is the forced interest in each other from being on the lonely road, the overly romantic male placed next to a hardened woman, a traditional love-triangle in its formation, and the fear that with an accomplished mission comes a permanent separation. Again, there are thousands of films that deal with one or two of these themes, but most can’t pull even that off. Cherry 2000 manages to pull off all of them, and cleverly disguise itself as a sci-fi/western b-movie that doubles as a Mad Max parody. Even with parody, it succeeds in actually becoming superior to Mad Max by not ever taking itself either too seriously or too far over the top to completely lose its audience.

    Like everything else in the film, the direction, while nothing overly spectacular, is better than most of its peers. Particular scenes, such as the Mustang hanging from a magnet attached to a giant crane, were done completely based in reality. No blue screens, or CGI, just stunt doubles and lots of things blowing up. This makes for a much more dramatic imagery when you add great wide shots of the Nevada landscape. This is how action films are supposed to be made. No fake sweat being splashed on the actors, or putting a fake backdrop behind them; it’s just an honest camera filming awesome stunts. There are only a handful of inventive, or even good, action movies, and for it to be good it needs to put you in the action and still retain humanity. This is why films like RoboCop, The Terminator, and Die Hard succeed and their copycats and sequels do not. With De Jarnatt’s gift for filming action scenes, it is surprising (and saddening) that he only directed one other complete film, Miracle Mile, which is also an exceptional.

    The score is excellent, but hardly original. Basil Poledouris, who scored Paul Verhoven’s RoboCop the same year, arranged it. The two scores, while they do go in different directions, share very similar themes. I am sure that both films being released by Orion Pictures had something to do with his involvement. But if you compare the final moments of RoboCop when the credits start to roll, and the dangling car battle in Cherry 2000, it is impossible not to notice the similarities. Basil was one of the great composers of modern cinema, that is destined to remain forever unknown to the general public, hidden by the John Williams of the world, but whom always seemed to find work, and be consistent in quality.

    If there is any fault in this film, it is in its second half when Lester (Tim Thomerson, Dollman) is introduced. We know he is the villain because we are told, but with the exception of a few moments he just seems too docile to lead a group of would-be outcasts. It works well for the parody aspect that he has cookouts with his group and they all do the hokey-pokey, but it makes him become a much less effective villain. He has no real purpose for wanting to kill our heroes aside from that they are there, and relatively close in proximity. Still, it is not like this is distracting because our heroes do need to be in peril, and Lester’s evil silliness is necessary to both move the plot along and make the characters more dependant on each other.

    There is more than enough good here to outweigh the film’s minor faults. It may sound like I am reasonably biased, and to a point, I am. This is my favourite movie of all time, even if is far from the greatest. First seeing this film as an eight-year-old in February 1989, I have seen it at least sixty times since. About fifteen of those viewings were since the day the DVD came out which, before it was announced, I emailed MGM nearly every day asking for a release date. Reading the email reply with the press release I was nearly in tears. To this obsession, there really is no excuse because no film is worth that much attention, and even more so not deserving of such a reaction. But everyone has “their” movie. Cherry 2000 is mine, and even if no one else in the world can see the wonder that I do, I offer up no excuses to them.
     
  3. ekent

    ekent The Lord's Arm of Justice

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    [​IMG]

    Summer Camp Nightmare

    Destined to line the shelves of many a horror section, Summer Camp Nightmare dissapointed many video store patrons who were looking for their horror fix. This film is actually a thriller-drama that is in the same vein as Lord of the Flies. If you can get past the fact that you have been duped into renting a non-horror title, then you'll be in for a treat.

    The story starts innocently enough, a few busloads of kids on their way to Camp North Pines. The normal games and activities fill the day for the young campers, and everything is running smoothly, until the night of the talent show, which the girls from Camp South Pines were invited to participate. After a few sexually charged themes are performed on the stage (one of them being Fear's "Beef Baloney"), camp director Mr. Warren (played by Chuck Connners) decides to shut it down, and cancel the dance, much to the dismay of all the horny teenagers.

    This pushes camp counselor Franklin Riley over the edge. Franklin is an ideolistic young man, well versed in political theory and rheotoric. He uses suspect means to convince the other campers to join him in overthrowing the camp and locking the counselors up in the "meditation room". The revolution goes as planned, and everyone is having fun, but the chain of command begins to crumble. Few revolutions prove to be bloodless, and this is no exception.

    I must have seen this film on HBO a few dozen times in the late 80's. Unfortunately, no DVD is out at this time so I settle for my laserdisc and VHS copies. With a DVD shelf lined with multi-million dollar budgeted films, this little gem has somehow crept its way into my top 5.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2007
  4. rhett

    rhett Administrator

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    And here I was just looking for a couple lines on your favorite flick. Great stuff guys, keep it coming!
     
  5. KR~!

    KR~! The Apocalyptic Kid

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  6. Workshed

    Workshed a.k.a. Villyan Shit

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    Wow, really great reviews so far. Noto, I especially liked your analysis of the score. Fun reads.
     
  7. jefff

    jefff Guest

    I gotta go with "The Tingler" by William Castle. It has all the right ingredients for a horror/camp classic: a rubber creature on strings that attaches itself to your spine, a brilliant scene where blood is the only color shown in the entire b&w film, Vincent Price, the "Percepto" gimmick which shocked audiences in their theater chairs at appropriate places in the film, many great scares, a creepy blind & deaf woman- need I go on? The Tingler is a classic, and you need to see it. NOW.
     
  8. RyanPC

    RyanPC Guest

    I think you took the term "camp classic" a bit too literally. :lol:
     
  9. dwatts

    dwatts New Member

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    I'm going with The Giant Claw (which is soon to hit DVD). Why? The bird - which flies in from Space - looks like a big turkey, made out of wire and egg cartons. It eats a man alive as he parachutes down, and chases planes - evading radar magically. As is the requirement for such movies, it's got bad FX, bad writing, bad acting, and no score to talk of.

    However, right at the end when the laughter is at it's loudesty, it pulls a bit of cinematic wonder - as the bird sinks to the bottom of the ocean, it's one giant claw protruding out of the water - if only it had given us the finger. It's a shot that will stay with you.

    Yeah - The Giant Claw it is.
     
  10. BloodMan

    BloodMan Kill Time B4 It Kills You

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    Reptilicus!
    The paper mache monster head speaks volumes... the "cartoony" poison it spits out... the "cartoony" man it eats in front of his family... the seriousness everyone in the cast emotes... Holy Jeez! Plus it has scrawny little wings on it's back that it never uses (though I have read in some foreign prints, this bitch takes flight) :)
     
  11. Egg_Shen

    Egg_Shen broomhead

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    The first picture that came to my head was The Ultimate Warrior. It’s been a favorite of mine mainly for having Yul Brynner as a no nonsense street fighter who sells his formidable talents to the highest bidding gangs in post apocalypse New York. The films cheap and somewhat ugly, but the atmosphere is there and the climatic fight between Brynner and William Smith is one of the best.
     
  12. KR~!

    KR~! The Apocalyptic Kid

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    He sure does:
    http://www.niftyfiftyscifi.com/Reptile/repfly.JPG

    UNCUT films are the best
     
  13. onebyone

    onebyone Guest

    [​IMG]

    Glen or Glenda.

    Pull the string! Pull the string!

    Is this a mess of a movie? Hell yeah it is. It's a disaster. A total mess - as was I when I first watched it. I had to pause the movie a few times to focus on breathing as I literally laughed myself sick. Good times. No movie has ever made me laugh that much. It made me an Edward D. Wood Jr. fan for life.

    Pull the string! Pull the string!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 10, 2007
  14. bigdaddyhorse

    bigdaddyhorse Detroit Hi-on

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    While probably not nearly old enough to considered "classic", the over-the-top campyness of Shark Attack 3 and House Of The Dead have a case and are my favorites.
    I humbly submit them so as to be entered.
     
  15. Erick H.

    Erick H. Well-Known Member

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    In all of his years turning out gothic horror tales and macabre Brit anthology films,terror master Peter Cushing had never quite strayed into the truly odd depths of a fright flick like SHOCK WAVES.I first saw this low budget,Florida shot epic on a late night screening more than twenty years ago and I've never been able to shake the memory of it.One of only a handfull of horror pics that Cushing shot outside of the U.K.(As well as being one of only two pictures in which Cushing appeared in with fellow horror icon John Carradine),SHOCK WAVES,on paper,sounds totally idiotic.A group of pleasure boaters are beached during a strange solar phenomena off of an uncharted island,and,much to their surprise,find it overrun by amphibious Nazi zombies,undead stormtroopers left over from World War 2.No surprise,scar faced German hermit/war criminal Cushing turns out to have been the commander of the Zombie squad,but,quite unexpectedly,he turns out to be as scared of the grey jacketed,albino killing machines as everybody else.There's really no reason why white faced,blonde haired guys dressed as Kommandos who loiter around in wading pools or trudge along at the bottom of lagoons should be anything other than silly,but damned if director Ken Weiderhorn(EYES OF A STRANGER) doesn't manage to make them downright creepy.Add to this that these zombies are smart,and fast,and stalk their pray like professional killers rather than just being more staggering Romero knock offs and you'll begin to see how this film offers something a little bit differentfrom most "living dead" pictures.Nice ,eerie locations,solid acting,creepy electronic music and fun support from the always great Cushing (and a wonderfully seedy Carradine) make SHOCK WAVES an unheralded little gem,one that sticks with you long after the subtly chilling finale.I can truthfully say,if you only see one underwater Nazi zombie movie,make it SHOCK WAVES.
     
  16. rhett

    rhett Administrator

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    You are right on with SHOCK WAVES, Erick. That's been one of the few horror movies whose atmosphere I haven't been able to shake from my head. Even if WEEKEND AT BERNIE'S II has forever ruined the concept of zombies underwater being scary for me, the menace of those underwater shots are unrivaled.

    Thanks for all the other suggestions too, guys and gals. This is coming along nicely. Everyone should be posting here though, since it really takes only a couple words to enter the contest. Let's hear some more cult love.
     
  17. mcchrist

    mcchrist A new breed of pervert!

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    Super Fuzz

    My earliest movie theater memories. I loved the piss out of this one, my mom loathed it. One of the few movies I could watch at any time.
     
  18. Noto

    Noto Guest

    :lol: Superfuzz is AWESOME! I wish there was a really good DVD release.
     
  19. RyanPC

    RyanPC Guest

    My favorite camp classic is also my favorite movie of all-time: Carrie! Any of you who doubt the campiness of this film need only examine Piper Laurie's mind-boggling, Oscar-nominated (!) performance as Carrie's mother, Margaret White. She gives Joan Crawford a run for her wire hangers in every department. Her deranged monologue near the end of the film is proof of that:

    I should've killed myself when he put it in me. After the first time, before we were married, Ralph promised never again. He promised, and I believed him. But sin never dies. Sin never dies. At first, it was all right. We lived sinlessly. We slept in the same bed, but we never did it. And then, that night, I saw him looking down at me that way. We got down on our knees to pray for strength. I smelled the whiskey on his breath. Then he took me. He took me, with the stink of filthy roadhouse whiskey on his breath, and I liked it. I liked it! With all that dirty touching of his hands all over me. I should've given you to God when you were born, but I was weak and backsliding, and now the devil has come home.

    [​IMG]

    I was so caught up in this imaginary battle between the two queens of camp that I created a fake poster for the movie version:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 11, 2007
  20. booper71

    booper71 Lord of the Thighs.

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    The Contagion (1987)
    one of my faves from the vhs era.
    A man follows a three fold path to achieve his desires, wrought with a spooky vibe and a different atmosphere than other horror titles of the time.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2007

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