Chi L'ha Vista Morire - Did Morricone screw it up?

Discussion in 'Euro Horror' started by Crystal Plumage, Jan 10, 2011.

  1. Crystal Plumage

    Crystal Plumage Dig me..but don't bury me

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    Last week I watched Lado's Who Saw Her Die? / Chi L'ha Vista Morire again, and noticed that the children's choir actually sings "Chi L'ha VISTO Morire", which translates "Who Saw HIM Die".
    Did Morricone screw things up or was the movie initially to be about a boy instead of a girl?
    a fake, gay priest would probably be just a bit too much...?
    Only Aldo knows I suppose?
     
  2. ReelFear

    ReelFear New Member

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    Very cool that you noticed this. A great giallo and no matter what the lyrics, the score is amazing.
     
  3. Anaestheus

    Anaestheus Well-Known Member

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    Is it insulting to reference Morricone's soundtrack for Duck You Sucker? I'm not sure if this is common knowledge or not. But, the main theme for that film is called "Shon" and the chorus is a female vocalist saying the name "Shon" repeatedly. However, the character's name is very clearly John. I believe that the film critic that did the audio commentary for that film believes that it is supposed to allude to John's past in Ireland, but even then, the name would be spelled Sean, not Shon. Very weird.

    So, my theory comes from the well known (?) fact that Morricone scored most of Once Upon a Time in the West based on the story that Argento, Bertolucci, and Leone had originally written. That story was scrapped and re-written later, but Leone kept the music. So, I will guess that Morricone may habitually work on his scores long before the film is completed and sometimes things like this just slip through.

    Good catch on your part though. I've heard the soundtrack hundreds of times and never noticed this.
     
  4. Crystal Plumage

    Crystal Plumage Dig me..but don't bury me

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    OK, lets try.
    The character's name, in America, is John. In Ireland he'd be called Sean, and in England Shawn.
    Now this is what I found Googling:
    http://www.chacha.com/question/how-do-you-spell-shawn

    So my guess is, you may be partially right. Morricone probably never read the script and Leone just told him what and who the movie was to be about

    Something like that ....
     
  5. MaxRenn

    MaxRenn Member

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    I just watched Duck You Sucker and the name of Coburn's character is confusing. In the scene where Juan (Steiger's character) repeatedly asks his name I really could not tell when Coburn says "Sean" and when he says "John". In the commentary, Frayling seems to suggest it is Sean (which Coburn anglicizes to "John" to make it easier for Steiger). Unfortunately the newspaper clipping from an Irish paper refers to the character as "John". This is probably just a Leone mistake.

    Interestingly on one of the extra features someone comes up with a complicated theory wherein Coburn's name is "John" and "Sean" is the name of Coburn's best friend in Ireland (played by David Warbeck in flashbacks). The theorist claimed that Coburn only said "Sean" the first time and was thinking of his old friend but changed afterwards. This theory strengthens the connection between the three revolutionaries and also changes the emphasis of the "Shon, Shon" on the soundtrack so that it reminds us and Coburn of his old friend. Having said that I don't really buy it.
     
  6. LupoSolitario74

    LupoSolitario74 New Member

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    Morricone's song lyrics are the Italian translation of the old English nursery rhyme "Who Killed Cock Robin?". Hence, "him" in the song refers to "cock robin", which is obviously male, while "her" in the title of Lado's film refers to each young female victim of the murder.
    I think that the title of the film derives from Ennio Morricone's song, by simply changing "him" with "her" in order to adequate it to the plot, and that Morricone chose his song's lyrics independently of the script, just in order to create a really terrifying atmosphere.
    The complete song can be found at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcTzhuMhX9k.
     
  7. Crystal Plumage

    Crystal Plumage Dig me..but don't bury me

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    Thanks for this, LupoSolitario74, I couldn't have guessed that because basically, I don't know that nursery rhyme/ poem. Now you're not such a Lone Wolf anymore, I'm your friend for life! :lol:
    Here it is, I Googled it:
    Etcetera.
     
  8. LupoSolitario74

    LupoSolitario74 New Member

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    You are welcome! :)
    I noticed the same discrepancy you did between "vista" in the title and "visto" in the song, and I immediately searched for an explanation. :confused:
    Unfortunately, to my knowledge this fact has not been explained in any book or web site (until now... ;)). Therefore, I typed "chi l'ha visto morire" together with other words of the song on Google Search, and I finally found a full correspondence between Morricone's song lyrics and the old nursery poem "Who Killed Cock Robin?". Amazing! :eek:
    I'm very happy about this little discovery... :lol:
     

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