Do you Own any Horror Reference/Review Books

Discussion in 'General' started by Ash28M, Oct 28, 2003.

  1. Rockmjd

    Rockmjd Guest

    Eaten Alive: Italian Zombie and Cannibal films
    Zombie Movie Encyclopedia

    where's a good place to pick up more?
     
  2. gloomy grrl

    gloomy grrl Guest

    I've got...

    -Cut! Horror Writers on Horror Films
    -Broken Mirrors / Broken Minds: The Dark Dreams of Dario Argento
    -Sex and Zen and a Bullet to the Head
    -some fanzines of Clive Barker
     
  3. MaxRenn

    MaxRenn Member

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    "Nightmare Movies" by Kim Newman is an excellent book. It covers the "modern" horror film starting with NOTLD and manages to cover a lot of ground.
     
  4. dwatts

    dwatts New Member

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    Anyone read "The Monster Show" by David Skal? It's knock-out-of-the park great!
     
  5. abattoir17

    abattoir17 Guest

    More Gore Score - Chas Blaun
    The Official Splatter Movie Guide: Vol. 1 & 2 - John McCarty
    Art of Darkness: The Cinema of Dario Argento
    Tales from the Crypt: The Official Archives - Digby Diehl
     
  6. Ash28M

    Ash28M Active Member

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    Thought I would update my list since I've acquired about 30 since my original post in 2003.
     
  7. spawningblue

    spawningblue Deadite

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    Off the top of my head...

    Bram Stoker's Dracula: The Film and the Legend (Newmarket Pictorial Moviebook)
    Crystal Lake Memories: The Complete History of Friday The 13th (Hardcover)
    Fangoria's 101 Best Horror Films You've Never Seen - A Celebration of the World's Most Unheralded Fright Flicks
    The Hammer Story - The Authorized History of Hammer Films (Hardcover)
    Horror Films of the 1980 (Hardcover)
    Screams and Nightmares: The Films of Wes Craven
    Terror on Tape: A Complete Guide to over 2,000 Horror Movies on Video
    The Vampire Cinema (Hardcover)
    Vampire Movies - An Illustrated Guide to 72 Years of Vampire Movies
    Zombie Movies The Ultimate Guide
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2011
  8. fattyjoe37

    fattyjoe37 Well-Known Member

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    When it comes to horror review books, the most in depth and informative are by John Kenneth Muir. His nearly 800 pages of reviews in Horror Films of the 1970s (released as 2 paperback volumes) and the even better Horror Films of the 1980s (a single hardcover release) are must owns. Horror Films of the 1990s comes out in August and looking at the jump in writing quality between the previous volumes, should be the best yet.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2011
  9. russweiss

    russweiss Well-Known Member

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    I own around 400 horror/sci-fi movie books and over 1000 magazines.
     
  10. Ash28M

    Ash28M Active Member

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    Thanks Fattyjoe I've always wanted to check our those books. I guess i'm going to need to now.
     
  11. chancetx

    chancetx Active Member

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    I love movie review/guide books but I've noticed with everything at our fingertips on the internet there haven't been many new guides or updates of my favorites. The internet is great but nothing can replace thumbing through a book with hundreds or even thousands of different films reviewed. Thank goodness for the DVD Delirium books coming out of the UK. And great news on John Kenneth Muir's Horror Films of the 1990s.

    Would love to see updates or new volumes of:

    The Psychotronic Video Guide (Michael Weldon)
    Terror On Tape (James O'Neill - one of my favorites)
    Creature Features (John Stanley)
    The Official Splatter Guide (John McCarty)
     
  12. Erick H.

    Erick H. Well-Known Member

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    I'd love to see new issues of these as well.I have all the ones you've listed plus The Official Splatter Movie Guide Vol. 2.Though not exactly a ''video guide'' I've always been fond of Kim Newman's Nightmare Movies.That HAS been updated,I need to pick that one up.
     
  13. Chunkblower

    Chunkblower Member

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    McCarty's Splatter Movie Guides are essential reading, if you can find them. Also out of print but well worth tracking down are Danny Peary's Cult Movies vols. 1-3.

    I recently picked up a copy of Horror Movies by Daniel Cohen. It was published in 1984 and uses the key art from the original Halloween on the cover, yet makes no mention of the slasher craze of the early 80's. Talk about an oversight.

    Horror Films by Nigel Andrews is a bit better, a little more scholarly in approach, and actually has some really salient points to make about horror archetypes, but is a bit too dismissive of more contemporary films. It was published in 1985.

    And, of course, David J. Skal's The Monster Show is an indispensable classic.
     
  14. spawningblue

    spawningblue Deadite

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    I have the 80s one and agree, it is great. The 70s one was actually first released as 1 hardcover but it is hard to find now and OOP. I have been trying to find that version to match the 80s hardcover I have and the new 90s one that comes out.
     
  15. rhett

    rhett Administrator

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    My favorite academia during my college years:

    The American Nightmare: Essays on the Horror Film (Robin Wood)
    Men, Women, and Chainsaws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film (Carol Clover)
     
  16. Workshed

    Workshed A Barge Person

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    [​IMG]

    Legacy of Blood: A Comprehensive Guide to Slasher Movies by Jim Harper

    [​IMG]

    The Hammer Story by Marcus Hearn and Alan Barnes

    both are worthwhile reads
     
  17. old-boo-radley

    old-boo-radley They stay the same age...

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    I have They Came From Within: A History of Canadian Horror and Terror on Tape. I really enjoyed Terror on Tape and what I've read of They Came from Within... but I have only read parts because I haven't seen all the films yet.
     
  18. dave13

    dave13 Well-Known Member

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    has anybody read this? as a kid i found it in the library and read it cover to cover. years later i found it used, and picked it up. haven't read through it again yet. it's broken up by subject, with one chapter on vampires, one on frankenstein, one on zombies, one on witches, etc. each one details the history of the subject, then looks at its place in classic literature and then films.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Chomp

    Chomp Rudest Motherfucker on HD

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    My Bible.
    [​IMG]

    Recently started to read The Complete History of the Return of the Living Dead. Pretty interesting and extremely extensive so far.
     
  20. KGBRadioMoskow

    KGBRadioMoskow Well-Known Member

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    I wanted to like the 80s book by Muir, but after reading review after review in which he inserts lengthy assertions that the particular film was a commentary on a grand social issue - and in this volume, AIDS and/or homophobia were the favorites - I pretty much gave up. Sure, many films - particularly in the *late* 80s - had a nod or even clear charge to such a message. But if Muir was to be believed those messages (again, in particular AIDS or homophobia) were pervasive throughout horror cinema production from the turn of that decade.

    The commentary hit a particularly ridiculous level when the AIDS reference was made to "The Thing" . Not that the comparison was made, as *in retrospect* it is fairly obvious here - contrary to some of Muir's other references where the comparison is a stretch. But that Muir makes page after page of direct statements that the comparison was *intended* by the film. Which would be all well and good if the film had been released in 1992 - rather than *1982*. Making the claim the comparison was intended a rather glaring bit of retro-active continuity on Muir's part, as the CDC had barely acknowledged the disease when the film was in production, its method of transmission was still unclear, the public and news media was almost completely unaware of it, the term AIDS was still a month away of being introduced at the time of the film's release, and Carpenter himself had repeatedly denied the comparison was intended or even something he would have considered at the time.

    It was this kind of reading of metaphors into films where they clearly weren't there - and ignoring glaring historical timelines in doing so - and then spending *pages* delving into the comparison - that caused me to preclude giving Muir another chance with his 90s volume. His 70s books had some over reaching issues, but IMO mostly stayed within the boundaries of film reviews rather than pontification masquerading as reviews. The 80s book steam rolled right over that line, and as insightful as Muir may have well meaningly intended to be, he over reaches to the detriment of his reviews' value. Not every horror film is a deep social issue commentary barely lurking behind buckets of fake blood, high pitched screams, and wince inducing imagery. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.
     

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