Halloween or Friday the 13th which triggered the slasher boom?

Discussion in 'Slashers' started by Ash28M, Jul 30, 2010.

  1. Harry Warden

    Harry Warden Well-Known Member

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    After reading the posts here, I have to give credit to Halloween for starting the slasher boom. The first set of slashers to be relesed soon thereafter all had that holiday angle to them, although I wouldn't really call Friday the 13th a holiday, but a themed day nontheless. Slasher films exploded after Halloween and marched right on into the 1980's with fervor. I can't imagine that many of the films that followed would have been thought of, much less made if it wasn't for Halloween. BTW, for anyone to refer to Halloween as not being an important or influential film in the horror genre..well all I can say to you is BULLSHIT!!!
     
  2. Paff

    Paff Super Moderator

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    And no one is disputing that.

    The point of contention is which film led more directly to the glut of early 80s slasher films. Or to put it another way, had F13 not been made, would we still have seen Slumber Party Massacre, Sleepaway Camp, Final Exam, etc etc?
     
  3. Body Boy

    Body Boy Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, nobody is disputing that at all. Obviously 1978 comes before 1980. But in a discussion like this, it...does...not...matter. I don't give a shit if F13 ripped it off, outspokenly, the topic of which triggered what we know now as the slasher boom still remains. As both sides have many strong arguments.

    In my opinion, Halloween started a bump, whereas Friday the 13th started the boom.

    ...

    As for "John Carpenter at his finest...perfect storm of atmosphere, pacing, and direction." Hahaha!!! It's hardly perfect, and the pacing isn't really great either. But whatever. Direction is good from Carpenter as he put a lot of effort into it. And yes, it does deserve to be recognized as a classic for what it has done and shaped...no pun intended. However, I'm just saying that maybe...maybe...it's not the greatest horror film as so many herald it up high to be.
     
  4. Egg_Shen

    Egg_Shen broomhead

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    Thanks for posting that! I love Pauline Kael's reviews, but I've never read that one.

    "As a doctor from the lunatic asylum that the killer has escaped from, Donald Pleasence is solid and forceful; enunciating in the impeccable tradition of Lionel Atwill, he delivers idiotic exposition about e-vil. Sometimes you think he's going to have to cross his eyes to keep a straight face."

    Vintage Kael. As for what started the slasher boom, I have to say that Friday the 13th is what opened the flood gates. It received a wide opening from a major studio. Nothing like that for either Halloween or Black Christmas. The whole idea of a negative pickup being released like that was new. Plus, it refined the formula somewhat. Higher body count, more spectacular kills, and the final girl has to dispatch the killer all by herself. No Donald Pleasence to save the day with his hand gun. Those may not be prerequisites for a slasher, but they were pretty much carried over in subsequent films.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2010
  5. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah but the topic said "Friday the 13th or Halloween? Which triggered the slasher boom?" It's obviously Halloween. How many slashers were made before Halloween? And afterwards? 1981 was a big year for slashers, definitely, but so was 1980, and many of the films released that year were still in production at the time of Friday the 13th. Halloween is ultimately responsible for the slasher boom. Halloween was the "trigger", then.

    ~Matt
     
  6. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    But yeah I know I'm being totally stubborn about this. While I think Halloween started the whole slasher boom in general, you really just can't give Friday the 13th much credit. Sure you can argue that the film had people killed in "creative" ways, but that too that had been done in so many other films before. Think of Bay of Blood, Suspiria, The Omen, etc. People are killed in creative ways in those films too. I would hardly call an axe to the face creative, or being grabbed from underneath the bed and having a spear poke through your neck, or having your throat slashed with a hunting knife very innovative.

    You can argue that Friday the 13th created a certain type of slasher film (gore over suspense), but you can't really give it much credit for anything more than that. It certainly wasn't the first "gory" film (look at giallos), nor did it have very inventive kills (they became more creative with the sequels - but even those were built off of other films). In terms of inventive kills, the murders in Carrie were more innovative, same with Sleepaway Camp, and I always felt the murders in Terror Train to be rather creative. Well, the concept at least. Friday the 13th really did nothing new. I mean, Halloween wasn't entirely original either (it seriously ripped off Black Christmas), but at least you can give Halloween credit for starting the slasher boom of the late '70s, early '80s. Sure it may have copied Black Christmas, but at least it was a good copy. I have no problems with films copying other films, so long as they're good copies (look at Sergio Leone's spaghetti westerns). Friday the 13th copied Halloween, but very poorly. I know this isn't a thread about which film is a more solid production overall, but someone mentioned the creativity of Friday the 13th. Fuck, even in terms of 1981, Halloween II still has more creative deaths than Friday the 13th, Part II.

    But either way, I stand by my case. Halloween started the craze, and all Friday the 13th did was copy it by mixing Halloween with the gore of a giallo, but in a rather sloppy way. If there was no Halloween, there would never have been Friday the 13th and thus no Friday the 13th imitators, so the sole credit has to go to Halloween.

    ~Matt
     
  7. Body Boy

    Body Boy Well-Known Member

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    Friday added gore, yeah, but the suspense was there in bulk, and personally I think it handle it better than Halloween. My favorite part about Friday the 13th are that the characters are all real and fun-loving, happy-go-lucky. That gets me more than the kills.

    As for Halloween copying BC and being good, and F13 copying Halloween and being poor...that's more of an opinion. I'll never understand the pedestal set aside for Carpenter's little thriller. Oh well...
     
  8. Iron Jaiden

    Iron Jaiden New Member

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    I think I'm gonna go ahead and say Dark Star kicked of the slasher genre and not ONE of you is gonna debate that!

    [​IMG]
     
  9. i'll go with Friday just cause i saw that one before i saw Halloween. F13 got me into the craze and I watched Halloween after Friday the 13th.
     
  10. JimSmith

    JimSmith Banned Mofo

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    Don't forget The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. Halloween was fun scary but The Texas Chain Saw Massacre was really scary! :)
     

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