How's your tv calibrated?

Discussion in 'High Definition' started by Zombie Dude, Feb 3, 2017.

  1. Zombie Dude

    Zombie Dude Well-Known Member

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    So I've been fiddling with my tv settings on and since I got my new set and I'm trying to find the best looking image.
    I know the first step is turning off all the digital processing stuff, so that's done. I am not sure whether Warm 1 or Warm 2 is better on my Samsung. I've settled for Warm 1 at the moment.

    My other issue is the HDMI Black Level setting. I have Low and Normal on my tv. It was originally set to Low which gives pretty nice looking black but it also seems to crush the image with them. Normal looks a little washed out but overall I think it looks better.

    How have you guys set up your TV's?
     
  2. Katatonia

    Katatonia Hellbound Heart

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    I use the Spears & Munsil HD Benchmark 2nd Edition. You can accurately calibrate just about any TV setting with it, including things like 3-D settings. It was $30, but has more than paid for itself.

    There are tons of tests and settings, and many of them the average user will find confusing or have no use for...but generally it takes about 30 minutes to an hour to properly calibrate your TV with the disc. There's an included booklet and a pair of glasses to help with some of the color settings, etc.

    I don't know how it works with 4K sets though, they haven't released a 3rd edition to cover that yet.
     
  3. buck135

    buck135 Kanamit

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    I have the Spears & Muncil blu-ray as well as Katatonia. It is extremely technical, thus requiring time and patience. Since I too own a 4K model, I ended up Googling TV calibration for the model number of my set. There are many articles and YouTube videos that helped me achieve what to my eyes is the best possible picture.
     
  4. SaviniFan

    SaviniFan I Have A Fetish

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    I have done anything from using the calibration feature you can actually find on some Disney DVD and blu-rays to googling in depth settings for my specific brand. If you take the time going through the detailed settings instead of "warm" or "vibrant" and save it, most times it will look better than anything the TV comes with as presets.
     
  5. Workshed

    Workshed a.k.a. Villyan Shit

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    Yes, look up your set's model # online and add 'calibration' to the search and you will likely find some guy who has done the work for you.
     
  6. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

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    Every panel is a little different, even when dealing with the exact same brands and models. I've seen that with my own eyes back when I worked with TVs. That random guy's calibration could be perfect, just a hair off, or even worse. It's always better to do it yourself.
     
  7. Katatonia

    Katatonia Hellbound Heart

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    Agreed, and also everybody's lightning situation in their viewing room is different, so they'll need some different tweaks as far as contrast and levels go. Some people watch things in a virtually dark room, and other like some side or back lighting.

    Finding some calibrated settings for a particular model on the web can be a good start, but they're rarely the best or most accurate you can achieve for your particular TV set. They'll rarely say if they calibrated it within a dark or brightly lit room, from 5 or 12 feet away, what other methods they used, etc..
     
  8. f.ramses

    f.ramses sociopath

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    I just use the free AVS HD 709 Calibraion disc, it's pretty basic but if you don't already own a calibration disc then it's worth a shot.
     
  9. baggio

    baggio Well-Known Member

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    Another vote for the Spears & Muncil calibration blu-ray. But before that I used some calibration I found on some TV/HD forums. Had that setup and tweaked it slightly from what I found on the internet. Then I bought the Spears & Muncil blu-ray. Was pretty amazed on how different some of the levels, like contrast & brightness were different from my previous settings after using the Blu.

    I own one much older TV that I have nothing calibrated on.(lazy don't care) Just using one the settings (example "Movies") currently. That TV is so much brighter than my much more expense & newer calibrated TV. For example, if I was to start watching a football game on the older TV then switch to the other room and finish it on the better TV, it looks sorta underwhelmed. Like the screen doesn't "pop". But the after a couple minutes you realize how much more natural & real the colors are. Not that crazy over brightness you see in the store when you're choosing a TV.

    P.S. - And this goes without saying. ALL my TV's , motionflow of any kind is turned OFF.
     
  10. Zombie Dude

    Zombie Dude Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the input guys. I can't even find reviews for my model online so I've been checking out random calibrations for Samsung models. Samsung's site had a bit of info on the Color Temp settings that mentioned STANDARD had no filters while WARM 1&2 add different intensities of red and COOL does the same with blue so I have mine switched back to Standard now. I might need to get a hold of one of these calibration discs.
    My other settings atm are Brightness on 45, Contrast on 90 and Sharpness on zero (some say to have it on low so I have no idea if leaving it on zero is good).
     
  11. Katatonia

    Katatonia Hellbound Heart

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    Sharpness set on 0 is rarely accurate or a good thing. Every TV model has its own ideal sharpness setting, which you can obtain by using a test grid and going up to the point where you start to get "halos" around the objects in the test grid. I think my TV has a sharpness setting of 51 for instance, any higher than that and you get halos and artificial sharpness applied.
     
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  12. Zombie Dude

    Zombie Dude Well-Known Member

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    Well there you go. I think 50+ becomes very noticeable on my tv but ill play around with it and see.
     
  13. Zombie Dude

    Zombie Dude Well-Known Member

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    I wonder why a large number of calibration settings I've seen and read say to turn Sharpness to zero then? Seems odd. I changed mine to 50 and I'm not noticing any halos.
     
  14. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

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    Mine is set to zero. Personally I think this setting is rather useless with modern sets. Sharpness used to deliver a major difference and improvement on CRTs. With LCDs and Plasmas, it isn't nearly so noticeable and with many sets you would be hard pressed to tell the difference between one set to zero and one set to 100.
     
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  15. Katatonia

    Katatonia Hellbound Heart

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    I can definitely tell a distinct visible difference on my set if it's set to 0 or 51. Above 51, artificial halos become quite noticable. With the test screens in Spears & Munsil for instance, it's even more easily noticable when you go up and down the scale with the sharpening settings. As long as the setting is not causing halos or introducing artificial sharpening, it helps rather than hurts.

    I think sharpness settings are more noticeable now on HDTV's than the old CRT SD TV's. I used to not see nearly as much visual difference on those with the sharpness settings when you toggled between low and high.

    They often say that, but back it up with no evidence, and never even bother with testing the setting. A user can just pull up a sharpness test screen and see if they can see a difference between 0 and 100. You can find calibration sharpness patterns for free on the web, but just be sure they are in a lossless format like png. I can tell a huge difference just by doing that on my TV. If there was really no difference...it just would not be so visually distinct between 0 and 100. On 0 it's blurred, on 50 it looks sharp and natural. On 100 it looks like an over-sharpened jpeg image.

    Every TV model is different and needs different settings to obtain the best results, and some might even be 0, but that is probably exceedingly rare.

    It's really no different from computer monitors. If I set my LG IPS on minimum it's just blurry, on high it's overly sharp. In the middle it looks just about right.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2017
  16. Zombie Dude

    Zombie Dude Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I've got to agree. I've been playing around with the sharpness on my set for the last hour or so on and off; I think it still looks great set at zero.
     
  17. Katatonia

    Katatonia Hellbound Heart

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    Have you used a test pattern? That's where you are going to notice the difference the most and can calibrate it most accurately for your model.

    You can really look at a movie for hours, play around with the settings, and not get a precise calibration by doing that.
     
  18. Zombie Dude

    Zombie Dude Well-Known Member

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    I can't seem to find the right one to tell properly on my tv. Looking at text seems to be smoother at 50 but I'm not entirely sure if that's set too high.
     
  19. Paff

    Paff Super Moderator

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    Just wanted to quote this, and I agree of course, EXCEPT when watching a concert film like Ziggy Stardust, Urgh! A Music War, etc. Turn it on for live music performances. Really makes a difference.
     
  20. Zombie Dude

    Zombie Dude Well-Known Member

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    It's called Auto Motion Plus on Samsung and I often wonder if I should leave it on a really low setting as opposed to having it off completely. I have heard that it can actually reduce frame rate but I'm not sure if that's true.
     

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