LD on HD

Discussion in 'Laserdisc' started by Paff, Jan 11, 2009.

  1. elahrairrah

    elahrairrah Guest

    I guess that might be one of the reasons why I've had pretty good luck with Laserdiscs on my friends' plasma since I've usually only used discs that look pretty darn good to begin with (Disney movies, The Rock DTS, Saving Private Ryan, etc.)

    I'm sure if I used something with a bad transfer, it'd look even worse on their plasma!
     
  2. Paff

    Paff Super Moderator

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    I'm not so sure anymore. I actually think I'm a little happier with the bad transfers! They're muddy and soft, and stay muddy and soft on the plasma. But the good movies (Boogie Nights, and Austin Powers) came from digital sources, and they seem to look more pixelated than the poorly done discs.

    More research to be done, methinks
     
  3. X-human

    X-human I ate my keys

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    I just watched a LD of The Wizard of Speed and Time on my plasma and it looked good, infact in a way it made me realize how processed upconverted DVDs can look. There was some really great travel shots with a camera mounted on a motorcycle and the image was real clean and clear. No noticeable blocking. I suspect that this segment went through less intermediates than the rest of this film, so that might be why it looked as good as it does.

    I'm using the BNC out on my player and converted it to RCA. I'm sure it's not as good as straight BNC but it's better than using the RCA out.
     
  4. Paff

    Paff Super Moderator

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    :confused:
    Why? BNC is coax cable, just like RCA. The connector is different, but that's it. The cable itself is the same, two conductor cable.

    I watched Jackie Brown on LD on Friday night, and it was fine. A lot of closeups in that one, and the detail on the faces was readily apparent. Of course, I then followed it up with The Descent on DVD, and there's a noticeable difference with the look of DVD vs. LD. I'm beginning to see that it's not a matter of LD being "bad", just different.
     
  5. X-human

    X-human I ate my keys

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    The BNC components are often better than its RCA components. Perhaps it's not going to create a discernible difference but I had the connector on hand so why the hell not?
     
  6. elahrairrah

    elahrairrah Guest

    What kind of player are you using? If you're using a Pioneer LD-S2 or HLD-X0 then you are probably benefitting from using the BNC output since, from what I've read, the BNC outputs on those players are purely composite with no Y/C recombination.
     
  7. Paff

    Paff Super Moderator

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    No, that makes no sense at all. As mentioned before, BNC is simply a different form of two-conductor cable than RCA. If you get a BNC-RCA convertor ('cause heaven knows I've had to buy enough of them in my film festival work), you'll see there ain't any electronics or monkeying with the signal. Just a different form of two conductor cable.

    Now, what BNC does offer is a locking connection, so that the cable will not accidentally become unplugged, and also provide a good connection to the sheild. The locking mechanism is the reason they are used in "professional" applications (like you mentioned above). You can plug and unplug them a million times and they'll still make the same contact. An RCA might get spread out and loose if you're using it over and over again.

    Like X-Human said, if ya got a BNC lying around, sure go ahead and use it. But as long as the RCAs are still making a tight connection (and you don't plan on disconnecting and reconnecting several times), you'll get the exact same video (or audio) quality. The signal carried on a BNC output is exactly the same.
     
  8. elahrairrah

    elahrairrah Guest

    I'm afraid you're wrong in the cases of the LD players I've mentioned. From the The X0 Project:

    As an example of its no-compromises approach, the XØ has a true 75-ohm BNC connector on the back, not just a cheap RCA connector. The XØ's composite output picks up the video stream before it is broken into chroma and luma. This seemingly-small detail allows us to use today's superior methods of processing the 'raw' composite signal, whereas nearly all other players separate first — with now-obsolete components — and then recombine to form the composite output. This means the composite signal has already been through a bunch of outdated processing before you can get at it. Even the much-lauded CLD-97 and CLD-99 players do internal Y/C separation prior to noise reduction and then recombine Y and C to create the composite signal. Since our source laserdiscs are encoded in composite, it is important that we use this output rather than S-Video.

    This archived thread on the AVS forum talks about how that pure composite video stream is only output from the BNC connector on the HLD-X0. I can't find the thread now, but I found another that states the BNC connector on the LD-S2 has the same non-altered composite output.
     
  9. Paff

    Paff Super Moderator

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    That whole non-altered composite thing is interesting, as I've never heard of it before. And going to my original point, I wonder why it's on BNC-only, as BNC is still just a coax connector. It's not like there's a certain kind of signal that can ONLY be carried on that kind of cable.

    If this wonderful non-altered signal was run through a $3 Radio Shack BNC-RCA converter, then through a GOOD RCA cable and into a TV, I guarantee there would be no difference. So why was a BNC used, if old-style RCAs would have carried the signal just as well? And especially why has this "non-altered" composite signal never been used before, if the technology to carry the signal has been present all along? Not to mention, what was the point of breaking down the signal, then re-assembling it?

    I'll keep looking around on this. Like I said, interesting concept, and I've never heard of it before now...
     
  10. elahrairrah

    elahrairrah Guest

    Not really sure why they chose the BNC connector for the pure composite output. My only guess was that at the time when the players were first put on the market--1990 for the LD-S2, 1994 for the HLD-X0--equipment that they would hope to utilize that pure composite stream were more of the professional type which would have BNC connectors.
     

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