my opinion on UHD 4K

Discussion in 'High Definition' started by horrorlover, Jul 9, 2017.

  1. MorallySound

    MorallySound Mad Mutilator

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2004
    Messages:
    7,357
    Likes Received:
    944
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Canada
    HDR stands for high dynamic range and is a dynamic range that artificially boosts what is defined by the standard dynamic range, which itself describes the standard image created using a conventional gamma curve. So basically sharpness, contrast, highlights, midtones, and shadows are all "cranked to 11". It's a bullshit setting designed to make things look more artificially "vibrant" and "dynamic".
     
    Workshed likes this.
  2. Workshed

    Workshed A Barge Person

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Messages:
    9,803
    Likes Received:
    1,455
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    London
    75" inch screen? You are LIVIN, bro.
     
  3. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2001
    Messages:
    10,862
    Likes Received:
    706
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Keene, NH
    Or you could save a boatload of money by connecting your 4K player directly to your set and then patching the audio out from the TV back to your amp. But that’s your choice.
     
    Fistfuck likes this.
  4. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2001
    Messages:
    10,862
    Likes Received:
    706
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Keene, NH
    There’s nothing artificial about it when done correctly. The problem is that HDR is only HDR if the source film was shot with HDR digital movie cameras. That excludes 95%+ of film history. And not only that but every link in the chain afterwards from the editing to the mastering to the set you watch it on has to be HDR. Anything else and it is pretty much like you describe. A classic like The Godfather will look damned good in 4K but it won’t be HDR and is never going to be HDR no matter what the studios try to tell you!
     
  5. Marv Inc.

    Marv Inc. Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Messages:
    325
    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Old England
    I didn't think tv's could decode full lossless 5.1/6.1 etc audio and i'am pretty sure they don't output HDMI only input and only HDMI can carry lossless audio optical cant carry it.
     
  6. X-human

    X-human I ate my keys

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    8,098
    Likes Received:
    776
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Illinois
    The HDMI output on a TV is designed as a pass through, so that things like 3D and HDR which many receivers can't handle can instead be sent first to the TV, and then the audio passes through the TV and back down to a receiver. There's still a handshake so everything should still be supported. That's the whole idea of it. Most new and especially high end TV's support it.

    But that's the principle of the idea. The practical application of it I don't know. I haven't needed to use it.

    Back on topic, it's kinda funny reading a few threads pop up on Blu-ray.com of all places with people pushing back on UHD like more pixels are somehow a burden upon them. Here we have people who unilaterally adopted Blu-ray over DVD (and Blu-ray over HD DVD) now complaining about the next great leap forward. They say history repeats itself, but it's still a wonder how it can happen in less than a 10 year period.

    There are already UHD TV's with a MSRP under $500. And sale prices under $400. And we we're just getting into Superbowl season so sales are only going to get better. By next Christmas? Forget about it! People say they're going to be hold outs, but in a few years their next phone is going to have higher resolution than their family room TVs. And when you go to Walmart to replace the TV in your den that finally burned out and all that's on the shelf is 4k I wonder how principled they'll still be that 1080p is all they need and they won't fall for anything "up selling" more. Or it they do what everyone else does and upgrade the family room TV and then that old TV goes to the den and the cycle of life continues.

    Sound > B&W TV > Color TV > VHS > DVD > Blu-ray > UHD > 8k > 16k > 32K > 64k > 128k > holodeck. It's gonna happen folks.
     
    Marv Inc. likes this.
  7. russweiss

    russweiss Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2007
    Messages:
    2,768
    Likes Received:
    564
    Trophy Points:
    113
    My mother of all people bought 50" 4K set for under $300.00 on black Friday. Prices are virtually affordable for just about everyone. Most people I would imagine spend more for their cell phone in a year than the cost of a nice 4K set.
     
  8. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2001
    Messages:
    10,862
    Likes Received:
    706
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Keene, NH
    Finding a 4K set for sale at $300? Plausible. Finding a "nice" 4K set for sale at $300? I'm skeptical.

    The 42" Plasma I have now I bought back in 2011 and is built like a tank. I absolutely love it. Unfortunately, nothing today even remotely compares build-wise, but if I had to replace it today, I likely wouldn't settle for anything less than this:
    https://www.sony.com/electronics/televisions/xbr-x800e-series
     
    Zombie Dude likes this.
  9. Zombie Dude

    Zombie Dude Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    Messages:
    5,923
    Likes Received:
    1,222
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Australia
    I have to agree. I've been playing with a few tv's with family and around the house and can say those cheaper ones definitely don't look quite as good. They're not 4k tv's but with things like colour for example they can look quite off, even with tinkering in the settings. If they're a bigger known brand then you're probably safer (Sony, Panasonic, Samsung, LG). Other brands I wouldn't trust quite as much.

    Just set up my old plasma for my fiance at her place to replace her cheap LCD and think it looks better. And yes, they're built like tanks. The only really shit thing is how heavy they are.
     
    maybrick likes this.
  10. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2001
    Messages:
    10,862
    Likes Received:
    706
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Keene, NH
    It depends upon the age of the plasma. I think my model year Panasonic was the perfect weight. Not the gigantic beast of a few years before, but not as flimsy as the last Panasonic production models were. I consider the weight a bit of a bonus. The thing that I really hate about the design of the new sets is how easily something like a cat can tip it over. With the new "two legged" stands if you push it back from the front they seem relatively stable. Push them from behind, however, and watch out. The pedestal type TV bases were far safer.
     
    Zombie Dude likes this.
  11. Katatonia

    Katatonia Hellbound Heart

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2003
    Messages:
    20,864
    Likes Received:
    1,557
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Missouri
    You can buy a "brace" to screw on the rear bar of most modern TV sets. I have one attached to the back of my Sony LED and it's rock solid. It probably took about 10 minutes to install.
     
    Zombie Dude likes this.
  12. Zombie Dude

    Zombie Dude Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    Messages:
    5,923
    Likes Received:
    1,222
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Australia
    I do agree some of these new sets are a bit flimsy. It does make them more preferable to wall mount though. I think I'll go that route once I have my own place. Also the wall brace like Kat mentioned is a great idea. I never thought of that. No ones pushing my old plasma over though, that's for sure :D
     
  13. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2001
    Messages:
    10,862
    Likes Received:
    706
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Keene, NH
    I know. We've been able to buy tethers and the like for flat screens since they've been available for retail. The difference now is that instead of being an optional accessory they've become rather mandatory.

    I've wall mounted enough TVs for people to know that it isn't something that I'd ever want done for myself. Don't get me started about the people foolish enough to want them installed over fireplaces.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
  14. SaviniFan

    SaviniFan I Have A Fetish

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2002
    Messages:
    5,808
    Likes Received:
    420
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    On the cutting room floor.
    I prefer to wall mount my televisions. The one downside for certain though is the inputs becoming difficult to access once you do.
     
    Workshed likes this.
  15. Workshed

    Workshed A Barge Person

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Messages:
    9,803
    Likes Received:
    1,455
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    London
    Right. I prefer televisions with side inputs now.
     
  16. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2001
    Messages:
    10,862
    Likes Received:
    706
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Keene, NH
    Right. I’ve also seen many HDMI cables, as well as the inputs themselves, damaged precisely because of this. Too many people want this, but don’t think enough ahead. For instance, snaking HDMI through walls. They don’t last forever and you better have a plan when they do. I once saw a guy have carpenters put HDMI behind drywall between two rooms. He then had us come in to install a TV on an arm, which we did, however, the carpenters didn’t leave enough slack (or easy access) so when the customer decided to move the arm... BAM! There went both the HDMI cable AND the input. Why he felt the need to fuck with it I have no idea because you couldn’t see it from any other position in the room, but there you go. Man, am I glad I don’t do that shit anymore!
     
  17. Zombie Dude

    Zombie Dude Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    Messages:
    5,923
    Likes Received:
    1,222
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Australia
    Well if I was wall mounting I'd want to use a bracket with an arm so you can actually pull the tv away from the wall and access all those cables when need be. I definitely wouldn't want to wall mount it if I can't access anything.
     
  18. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2001
    Messages:
    10,862
    Likes Received:
    706
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Keene, NH
    Too much risk of damaging the TV inputs, particularly if you insist upon hiding the cables which a lot of people do. It can be done safely, but man is it still a pain in the ass.
     
  19. Zombie Dude

    Zombie Dude Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    Messages:
    5,923
    Likes Received:
    1,222
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Australia
    You're probably right. I'll have to wait and see. Maybe I can manage it.
     
  20. Zombie Dude

    Zombie Dude Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    Messages:
    5,923
    Likes Received:
    1,222
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Australia
    So I watched the disc the other night and it really is a weird one. I mean genrally it looks good but with that grain totally gone it just looks off. On top of that the colour correction just didn't seem right and gave the film a really drab look. It's not as bad and noticeable as the Predator transfer but after watching it I can't say it's my preferred way to view it. Going to sell the disc off. Real shame.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018
    Katatonia likes this.

Share This Page