Splatter University coming to DVD

Discussion in 'Slashers' started by Vdlman, Aug 23, 2004.

  1. RyanPC

    RyanPC Guest

    Tuz! :lol::lol::lol:

    You should have cropped it on Linda and Olivia. ;)
     

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  2. Katatonia

    Katatonia Hellbound Heart

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    Hey, I love Troma movies too. Well... most of 'em anyways! :evil:
     
  3. Tawny

    Tawny You guys got sour balls?

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    And lets not forget, if not for Troma, we would not have.......

    [​IMG]

    The Stabilizer
     
  4. speanroc

    speanroc I WANNA BAN

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    troma is cool man !!!!!!!!!!!!, and charles kaufmann is lloyds brother who brought us the classic MOTHER'S DAY......
     
  5. Is Splatter going to be Uncut? And it's a shame Troma didn't do more for some of their dvds, but oh well.....
     
  6. STREET TRASH

    STREET TRASH Synthicide

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    So since it isn't far off that Splatter University will be released - anyone know the specs?/what's the cover art look like?.... Hopefully the same as the poster/Vestron VHS.
     
  7. booper71

    booper71 Lord of the Thighs.

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    i hope they keep the original cover art, would be a shame not to.
     
  8. Final Terror

    Final Terror Guest

    I think Splatter University just scrapes by, providing the viewer with an cheesy story, decent acting from Francine Forbes as the final girl, a blow-job giving Chinesse slut (lol), good gore (the opening stabbing and the toilet scene stand out), and a rather downbeat ending.
    Just hope Elite put out the unedited version, and not the R-Rated cut, though I can't see them providing any extras. Also Elite will provide better audio/visual then Troma, which is a blessing!
     
  9. This is Richard W. Haines, director of the above mentioned movie.
    To answer the postings, "Splatter University" will be the uncut version.
    It's mastered from a 16mm low contrast print directly off the camera negative. It was shot in 16mm and blown up to 35mm but the 35mm
    is grainy so we went with the 16mm original which is sharper and finer
    grain. It's the only feature I made in the format. The others were
    filmed in 35mm. Since this was my first movie, it's pretty crude but
    has a few amusing bits in it. We made it for $25,000 back in 1982.

    I'm not able to discuss what happened between Troma and myself.
    However, I will say that following "Class of Nuke Em High", I started
    my own production company called New Wave Film Distribution, Inc.
    It enabled me to have complete autonomy in my productions which
    included directorial authority, final cut and I own and preserve my
    negatives. Although I work within modest budgets, I've tried
    to upgrade my product over the years. I have good cinematographers
    (that simulate the Technicolor look), performers and slick editing. I try to make B + films rather than B films.

    My first feature under the New Wave banner was "Space Avenger"
    (on video "Alien Space Avenger") which we printed in 3 strip Technicolor
    in China. It was a big hit and the Technicolor aspect got me on
    Entertainment Tonight and articles in Variety and Hollywood Reporter.
    It was released by AIP video in 1991.

    Next I made "Head Games" starring the late Christopher Stone in 1993. It was
    a medical thriller. Following that I made "Run for Cover" (1995) in 3-D starring
    Adam "Batman" West, Viveca Lindfors, Ed Koch, Curtis Sliwa and Al
    Sharpton. I did a film noir next (part of it in B&W) called "Unsavory
    Characters" (2001) . The latter two were released on DVD by Pathfinder.
    At some future point, I'll be re-issuing "Run for Cover" in 3-D on DVD too.

    My latest film is called "Soft Money" (2004). It's a heist film and political satire. It will be released soon. Curtis Sliwa appears in this one too as a commentator.

    My next feature with be a horror film, returning to my roots. There will
    be gore but it will not be exploitation. I'll make sure there is good production value, special effects and acting.

    You can see details and reviews of the films at www.imdb.com. Click on my name, Richard W. Haines, in the SEARCH engine.

    For those interested in film history, I wrote two books which are published by McFarland (www.mcfarlandpub.com). They are "Technicolor Movies" and "The Moviegoing Experience 1968-2001". I did a whole chapter on Splatter films and exploitation in the latter and it's impact on exhibition and
    moviegoing demographics. I even list every indie film distributor. Troma is not the only survivor. Aquarius is still around. So am I for that matter although I started in 1986 in the distributor field.

    I also wrote an article about Super Cinecolor and Abbott and Costello's "Jack and the Beanstalk" on www.louandbud.com for those interested in obscure
    technology.

    Finally, I did the comic illustrations for a Children's Picture book entitled,
    "Animal Kingdumb". You can check it out on www.Xlibris.com

    For those who live in the Westchester/Putnam area and would like to be an extra in one of my films, email me at: Newavedist@aol.com
    Of course I cannot pay you but you'll have a chance to appear in a feature
    film. You'll be required to sign a general release. Our next shooting date
    is Friday Oct. 22, 2004. We'll be filming in Dutchess County.
     
  10. I have some extra autographed posters for sale of "Splatter University"
    if anyone is interested. $20 per one sheet.
     
  11. WesReviews

    WesReviews Active Member

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    Welcome to the board, Richard! :)

    I didn't know this film was so old. For some reason I always assumed it was a late 80's slasher that came out around the time of April Fool's Day or Cheerleader Camp. I remember seeing the old video artwork in my parents' video store way back when, but it's not a title I can recall actually seeing. It's interesting to know that it was made in 82, right in the thick of the best period (in my opinion) of the sub-genre, though.

    Also, for those asking what the cover art would look like, Retro Slashers has posted it..

    [​IMG]

    Lastly, I've noticed it's already up for pre-order at places like DVDEmpire.com and Amazon.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2004
  12. RyanPC

    RyanPC Guest

    Actually, I kinda like that cover. I'm getting this DVD. :)
     
  13. Katatonia

    Katatonia Hellbound Heart

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    I've already pre-ordered it. Elite lists only that it "Includes Theatrical Trailer" on their website. Hopefully it'll have more than that!
     
  14. onebyone

    onebyone Guest

    Oh thank you for that cover art. I have this preordered, but had no idea what the art was. I think that looks pretty damn good. I am so excited this is coming out on dvd. This is must have for a slasher addict like myself.

    And no matter what happened between Mr. Haines and Troma, I am just thrilled that they aren't putting out the DVD. That would inspire me to not get it and try to squeeze a little more life out of my VHS.

    I was looking at Richard Haines' resume and saw he was the sound effects editor for Madman. That made me smile.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 9, 2004
  15. Actually, I was amused when I saw the listing of "Madman" in my credits.
    I completely forgot I worked on it. I think the original title was "Madman
    Muntz" or something. I'll have to get a copy to see if it rings a bell. It
    was quite some time ago although I recall most of the other B movies I
    worked on before directing my own productions. I recut a couple of
    porns for Troma from hardcore to soft, "The Secret Dreams of Mona Q"
    and some other one I forgot the name of. I also re-cut "Squeeze Play"
    for network broadcast but the deal fell through and they never aired it.
    For those who don't know, Troma started in hardcore porn with titles
    like "Hot Nasties". They branched out into R rated sex comedies with
    "Squeeze Play" but those started fizzling out. I made "Splatter University"
    independently and they released it in 1984. It did so well they decided
    to switch to horror exploitation instead of sexploitation and made "The Toxic
    Avenger" which I edited (and shot the ending of). It did so well that they
    decided to stick with horror from then on but it was "Splatter" that made
    them switch gears.

    Here's some additional trivia on "Splatter University"...

    The girl on the poster of was Elizabeth Kaitan who later starred
    in "Attack of the Killer Bimbos" in 1988.

    John Michaels, the co-producer of the film (and the guy getting a blowjob
    in the drive in scene) later produced "I was a Teenage Zombie" then quit
    the movie business to become a Greek Orthodox Monk.

    Associate Producer, Peter Ilich, still works with me. He assisted on my productions "Run for Cover", "Unsavory Characters" and the upcoming
    "Soft Money".

    Denise Texiera (the girl who gets stabbed in the mouth) was the girl in the poster of Troma's "Zombie Island Massacre" even though she never appeared
    in that movie.

    In opening insane asylum sequence, we shot in the real Bellvue in NYC.
    Some of the wards were closed in 1982 when the ACLU and other activists
    demanded that mentally ill inmates were being held against their will.
    They let them go and they ended up becoming part of the homeless
    problem.

    The Hollowbrook drive in that we shot in (Peekskill, New York) was the one
    I used to attend as a kid. I saw the "Planet of the Apes" films there and epics like "Ben Hur". They were showing "Alligator" while we shot there in 82'.
    Later, they played a double bill of "Splatter University" and "Squeeze" play circa 1984 before it was demolished.

    Ralph Cordero was about 16 when he did some of the splatter effects for the film. He later did the effects for Francis Teri's "The Suckling". Francis became the co-producer of my picture "Head Games" after that then left the business. He's now a successful manufacturer of school supplies.

    In fact, most of the people I worked with over the years left the film business, primarily because it's so dishonest. It's very hard to
    collect on deals and about half the time you get screwed. You have to
    manufacture enough product so you collect on some titles and can make
    a profit. It's virtually impossible to collect on every deal so you average
    it out. Let's say you collect on 3/4 of the deals you make worldwide and it
    exceeds your production cost by 25%. That would be a profitable film.
    The trick is not to spend more than you can make under this scenario.

    One thing I never do is to give any distributor, agent or marketing entity
    my original camera negative. If I did, the film would become 'lost' like
    so many indie features. The camera negative stays with me and I only
    manufacture IP's, IN's and other pre-print for distributors. That way I can
    preserve my own masters since I know distributors will never do it.
    Most of the labs I used to do business with went bust over the years.
    When a lab goes under, you have a short window of opportunity to
    get your negative out of there before it gets thrown away. So, I have
    my own temperature controlled storage vault.
     
  16. Katatonia

    Katatonia Hellbound Heart

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    Interesting movie facts, thanks!

    So, Richard will there be many special features on the new DVD?
     
  17. Tawny

    Tawny You guys got sour balls?

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    I did not know that! She was also in Friday the 13 part 7 too. A real cutie.
     
  18. WesReviews

    WesReviews Active Member

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    So, Richard...slightly off the topic of Splatter University...how many independent horror films (from the 80's and before), to your knowledge, have become "lost"?

    This subject fascinates me. How films can just up and disappear due to one reason or another (London After Midnight is perhaps the most famous case).
     
  19. bigwes15

    bigwes15 Active Member

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    Richard, could you tell us any more about your "Run For Cover" movie? That one sounds very interesting. I would also be curious to know about any possible special features on the Splatter U DVD.
     
  20. Well now...the subject of 'lost' films is rather complicated and requires
    some qualifications.

    There are different types of movies being 'lost'.

    There's lost in the sense that no negatives or prints exist at all. In the case
    of pre-1948 films, that was due to the volatility of the nitrate stock they
    used. It was very flammable and subject to complete decomposition. You would open up a can and it would be brown powder that smelled like rotten eggs. In that state of deterioration, it could spontaneously explode.

    Tri-acetate safety film replaced nitrate from 1948-1951 and over the decades most (but not all) distributors made duplicate negatives on that stock. The trouble was, nitrate was only good for about 30 to 40 years in the best storage conditions. The silent era films were beyond that time period by the time safety film was introduced so the vast majority decomposed before they could be transferred.

    There are still lost films made on the more stable tri-actetate film
    from 1948-2004. These are primarily independent features. Indie production companies, distribution outlets and labs tended to be financially unstable. When they went out of business, materials were simply thrown away. For example, there were about 100 indie distributors from 1968 through the advent of video. Only two survived which are Troma and Acquarius. What happened to the K. Gordon Murray negatives or Jerry Gross negatives? No one knows except that the labs they used also folded.

    Then there is lost quality. This refers primarily to the problems of Eastmancolor fading which affected indie productions more than the majors which used the fade proof Technicolor process. Eastmancolor was introduced in 1952/53 and processed under various lab trade names like De Luxe, Pathecolor, Warnercolor and so forth. The stock was very unstable and both prints and negatives faded over the years. Low fade Eastmancolor stock was not introduced until 1983 which meant that the first thirty years of color films (excluding Technicolor) are in danger of fading away. The major studios started making duplicate negatives on the new low fade stock,
    sometimes with success and other times with poor results. For example, the negative of "Tom Jones" (1963) had faded to such a degree that new prints tend to look sepia and almost colorless. Even the 1997 re-issue of "Star Wars" had pinkish fleshtones in the first reel.


    As always, indie movies suffered the worst because funds were not available to transfer the negatives and/or the companies that made the movies folded long ago. (That's why I preserve my own movies).


    The other type of lost quality refers to movies where no negative exists and they dupe of a surviving release print which is usually very worn. Most silent movies are dupes of battered prints and they look it with washed out gray scale and splices. I guess it's better than nothing but they're not pleasant to view considering they originally looked like brand new B&W prints that sparkled on the movie palace screens. Many people assume the dupey looking junk out there is what silent movies actually looked like in theaters which is a shame. I've seen original nitrate prints projected and they looked spectacular. They could get much better quality today by using digital technology to restore silents (and even sound films) from prints when the negative is lost but it's quite expensive. Most silent movies are in the public domain and it would be difficult to recoup the cost of restoring them digitally.

    As to a comprehensive list of what's lost in each of these categories, it would take too much space to post here. You can log onto the AFI website which has a list of what they're still looking for like a complete print of Laurel and Hardy's only Technicolor movie, "The Rogue Song" (only a clip survives) and silent horror films like "London After Midnight".

    A few years ago I remember the producer of "The First Nudie Musical" was looking for a surviving release print of his movie since the negative was lost.
    Unfortunately, even if he found one it would've been faded.


    There's always hope of finding lost films in private film collections. I'm a collector and I have a number of lost movies within the above categories.
    One of them is a 35mm uncut Super Cinecolor preview print of
    Abbott and Costello's "Jack and the Beanstalk" from 1952. The camera negative became lost when the lab folded and RKO re-issued the movie in B&W in 1961. The print I have was duped off in 16mm for syndication but those copies were pretty dupey looking. This copy I have was never shown in theaters so it's lab mint and contains about 6 minutes of extra footage, some of which has never appeared on tape or DVD. Unfortunately, it's also PD so there's little incentive for me to release it since no one would pay
    me to transfer it to tape. I do screen it once a year or so. Super Cinecolor
    looked a bit like Technicolor (very garish hues) and didn't fade. Pretty funky looking.

    I also restored the formerly lost 3-D short "Motor Rhythm" which was the first Technicolor film in the process. It premeired at the 1940 New York World's Fair. An associate found the original dual eye 35mm Technicolor copies and I transferred them to the above/under single strip process I used in "Run for Cover". It's window boxed 1.33 within a 2.35 x 1 frame. I showed it with some engagements of my feature.

    I have a lot of other neat stuff in my archive which I won't post here.
    Suffice it to say, not everything officially listed as 'lost' necessarily is
    although it might not be publicly available.

    Unfortunately, for horror buffs, I don't know anyone who has a surviving print of "London at Midnight". Very few nitrate copies from that era haven't crumbled to dust. There is a film collector that has the Edison version of "Frankenstein".
     

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