The 70s vs the 80s

Discussion in 'Reader Polls' started by MrVess, Feb 16, 2009.

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Which decade triumphs above the others?

  1. The 70s!

    33 vote(s)
    61.1%
  2. The 80s!

    21 vote(s)
    38.9%
  1. spawningblue

    spawningblue Deadite

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    Although the 70s probably had the more original and better made horror films, I had to go with the 80s. I own more 80s films and they get re watched more then a lot of the stuff from the 70s. That was when the slasher genre really hit its high point, including the Friday films and its many sequels, which I love all of them! It was also when gore and special effects were at the top of their game as well, which can always make a bad film good. It was when horror films become really fun to watch, and what got me into the horror genre.

    Unrelated, but the 80s was also the best time for cartoons; G.I.Joe, Thundercats, Masters of the Universe, Transformers, Ninja Turtles, C.O.P.S ect. Damn we were spoiled back then! I feel bad for kids these days who only know of Pokemon and all that other Japanimation crap.
     
  2. bwana the clown

    bwana the clown Supreme Ruler Of Sados

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    Just an arbitrary year to start on. I suppose I should have just said mid-70s to mid-80s. That should leave enough wiggle room. :D
     
  3. x666x

    x666x Well-Known Member

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    That summarizes it up for me as well. There may have been a high level of quality in the 70's, but I can still watch all those films in a very short period of time. The 80's had a great level of quality and quantity as a result of film studios cashing in on the horror trend through not only theatres, but also with VCRs that became prominent in the 80's as well.

    Punk rock turned into hardcore punk in the 80's, and horror got more in your face as well. It really isn't a tough call on my end.

    I am not going to apply morals and ethics as far as originality is concerned to this debate. There was simply a high enough quality that when matched with quantity, I was given years, not months worth of (worthwhile) rentals to consume as a kid in the 80's.
     
  4. Kim Bruun

    Kim Bruun Resident Scream Queen

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    Thematically, the 70's were richer, more experimenting, but to me, the 80's perfected (and then ruined) a lot of the ideas of the 70's horror films.

    I went with the 80's, because of the slasher boom - that tradition has yielded so many films that I love. There are still many individual 70's horrors that I find effective and consider personal favourites, but in terms of my own enjoyment, the 80's win by a hair.

    Artistically, though, the 70's would have won.
     
  5. X-human

    X-human I ate my keys

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    80's was some of thee worst animated shows, including the ones you mention. They don't even call those 80's shows full animation because they were so cheaply made, often recycling footage.

    40's/50's was the best animation.
     
  6. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    Definitely. My brother LOVES Thundercats. I got him the boxset for his 26th birthday lol. But I dunno...a lot of those shows were pretty shitty. Nothing beats the old Road Runner/Bugs Bunny/Warner Bros. cartoons, then you have stuff like Tom & Jerry, and The Flintstones and The Jetsons from the '60s. Great stuff.

    Although I like a lot of '80s movies and music, it still is widely considered one of the worst decades for both. Every decade that preceeded it was so much better. '80s movies have aged so much worse than stuff from the '60s, '70s and fuck, even the '50s. Sure there were some great movies, but for every great movie made in the '80s, there are about 15 shitty ones.

    ~Matt
     
  7. Devo1313

    Devo1313 New Member

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    70s and 80s for me. 70s is when all the good new wave/punk music started and then movie wise we got Horror High,Kiss of the Tarantula,Willard,Halloween,Laserblast,House That Screamed,etc. but the 80s were pretty decent in more weirder and fun new wave on synths and then flicks like Scalps,Final Exam,The Prey,etc. The problem was is that toward the end of the 80s the grindhouses and drives ins started to go out. It was the end of a very nice fun time for music and movie fans. It was a nice open era and time from 1976-1987.
     
  8. DVD-fanatic-9

    DVD-fanatic-9 And the Next Morning, When the Campers Woke Up...

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    70's.

    For the same reason I choose 90's over 00's - Quality over Quantity. The 80's were fun and everything. The movies were very good at taking peoples' minds off big world / political / cultural / social problems. But the filmmaking of the 70's was much more controlled and thoughtful and interesting and experimental.

    And let's face it, there were more masterpieces. More budding filmmakers hitting their peak. In the 70's we saw Carpenter's best (Halloween, The Fog), Argento's best (Deep Red, Suspiria), Romero's best (Dawn of the Dead, The Crazies), Hooper's best (Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Salem's Lot), Craven's efforts were uniformly strong and outstanding (Last House on the Left, The Hills Have Eyes). Bob Clark (Deathdream, Black Christmas).

    Filmmakers were able to achieve more and experimented more with better results. I also think filmmakers took strange, bizarre concepts and took them further than any other decade could. Or took cliched, schlocky ideas and made them valid and interesting. Alan Ormsby's Deranged. Joe Dante's Piranha. Joe Lieberman's Squirm and Blue Sunshine. Larry Cohen's It's Alive and God Told Me To. David Cronenberg's Rabid and The Brood.
     
  9. spawningblue

    spawningblue Deadite

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    The Fog was 1980
     
  10. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    It was filmed in 1979. There are a few that I don't think totally count as '80s. The Shining and Friday the 13th were filmed in 1979, but were released in 1980. Same thing goes for The Evil Dead. Was filmed in 1979, but didn't premiere until 1981. Sometimes release dates don't have anything to do with when the movie was produced. All those films have more of a '70s vibe anyway (very much like most early '80s horror). By the time 1980s horror got its "80s feel" the genre had been pretty much run into the ground.

    ~Matt
     
  11. spawningblue

    spawningblue Deadite

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    I agree with The Shining and Friday the 13th, but I think Evil Dead and The Fog definitely have an 80s feel to them over 70s.
     
  12. x666x

    x666x Well-Known Member

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    A lot of good points made, but more extensive this thread becomes, the more I of this as an issue of era as mentioned earlier, generally spanning from the mid 70's to the mid 80's.

    Is it me or do the late 70's film feel like the eighties anyway. I watched all these films literally in the 80s on tv or as a rental. And their sequals all basically happened in the 80's as well. These franchises basically belong to the 80's, even if they started in the late 70's. Maybe a little off topic.

    Even pertaining to the discussion of the Fog, it was supposed to be more of a ghost story, and to what I recall, the studio pushed JC to making more of a slasher like Halloween. Not a big fan of studio meddling, but shit, a studio wanting the director to make a film more violent? To me, it made it a better film. This studio push must have happened in '79, helping set the trend in the 80's, an era where violence equalled money. Of course, this trend was reversed later in the 80's because of the ratings board. But now you can only get this kind of mainstream violence equals money attitude with video games. This is part of the reason why the 80's kicked ass, it was so normal to watch really violent films as a kid. It was institutionalized in massive doses. Look at horror now, there is some great films being made, but the 80's was an avalanche with some brilliant horror in a sea of some still semi credible horror. It just has never happened since. And the 70's started it, but was nowhere near developed yet as an industry, only as one offs. My opinion.
     
  13. DVD-fanatic-9

    DVD-fanatic-9 And the Next Morning, When the Campers Woke Up...

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    I agree with you on Evil Dead. But not on The Fog. Anyway, it was just my opinion. But it does kind of make the phrase "we saw John Carpenter's best, Halloween and The Fog," an incorrect statement.

    Good detective work. :evil:



    Just you.
     
  14. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    Well, really, think about that for a second, how is that possible? How is it even possible that a late '70s film feels like an '80s movie? (The '80s hadn't even started yet!) It doesn't make sense. It's the styles and (obvious) fashion/culture of the '70s that overlapped into the early '80s. Just like a lot of early '70s films feel like '60s movies, a lot of early '60s movies feel like '50s movies, a lot of early '50s movies feel like movies from the '40s and so on. It takes time for a decade to totally define itself, so it's those early '80s movies that feel like '70s movies, not the other way around.

    Look at the early Friday movies. Parts 1, 2 and even 3 feel a lot like '70s movies. (The film's style, fashion/pop culture, etc). That's what's kindof bugged me about part 4. Parts 2, 3 and 4 are supposed to have taken place within the span of like...a weekend. Parts 1, 2 and 3 have that hopelessness "vibe" to them that, like I said, most '70s films have (Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Last House on the Left) and the fact that the first 3 films only have one survivor proves this. The loneliness and isolation (very prevalent in The Evil Dead as well). Anyway, you have parts 2 and 3 that have that '70s vibe, and part 4 which has a very '80s vibe to it. (Remember, part 4 came out 2 years after part 3, so it gave the decade a little more of a chance to mature.)

    I guess my point is, is that a decade takes time to mature and define itself. The '80s "vibe" in films didn't really start until about '83, because if you take most movies before that period, they feel very '70s (ESPECIALLY The Evil Dead). You have that early '80s vibe (which was like '83, '84, '85, '86) and then the late '80s vibe (late '86, '87, '88, '89) and you can totally see it in each Friday movie how this '80s feel developed throughout the series, and how it's almost nonexistent in the first 3 films.

    As for the discussion on The Evil Dead. How does that possibly seem like an '80s movie? This movie is a PERFECT example of a 1970s horror film. It has that feeling of hopelessness to it that most '70s horror films had. Hell, even look at what they're wearing. Anybody who (or anybody whose parents) grew up in the '70s should be able to pinpoint this '70s vibe. Look at their clothes, look and their hairstyles, VERY '70s. It's impossible for them to have had an early '80s hairstyle if the film was made in 1979. I think some of you have it the wrong way. It's not that late '70s movies feel like early '80s movies, it's that early '80s movies feel like late '70s movies. (The Evil Dead is just as "70s" as The Fog).

    ~Matt
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2009
  15. Ash28M

    Ash28M Active Member

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    I agree with Matt89. I've always thought early 80's horror films felt more like the 70's.
     
  16. Grim

    Grim Well-Known Member

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    70's were great, but I picked the 80's. I know I'm going to catch a lot of flack for this, but I think the whole 70's grindhouse/exploitation thing is vastly overrated. Not saying there aren't amazing films that carry that vibe, but so many others are just bad. In my opinion, the 80's had better scores, better effects, sets, etc. Yes things did start to grow stale near the end, but eh it's what I like. I also enjoy the fun campiness of a lot of the 80's horror flicks. I think that adds to the replay value for me, as opposed to the outright bleakness of many 70's flicks, even though there are films that have that trait which I rewatch regularly. I would agree that there were more pioneers of genre either thriving or emerging in the 70's, but I think many of them perfected their craft and in most cases even peaked in the 80's.

    Examples IMO include:

    John Carpenter: The Thing
    Dario Argento: Tenebre, Opera
    David Cronenberg: Scanners, Videodrome, The Fly, etc.
    Brian DePalma: Dressed to Kill, Blow Out, Body Double
    Wes Craven: A Nightmare on Elm St.

    I guess if I had to pinpoint the exact time period I prefer, I would say 1975-1987, with obvious classics from outside those years included.
     
  17. DVD-fanatic-9

    DVD-fanatic-9 And the Next Morning, When the Campers Woke Up...

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    Actually, I agree that Cronenberg's 80's offerings were better overall than his 70's.
     
  18. Grim

    Grim Well-Known Member

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    I will agree that the Evil Dead is very much a 70's film. In fact two thirds of it was filmed in 1979, it just took forever for it to get released. There is this strange thing with films that came out in 1980, I guess it could be attributed to a good amount of them being filmed in 1979, that they feel like 70's horror. The Evil Dead, Friday the 13th, the Shining, Inferno, all examples of this.
     
  19. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm...I'd agree with most of what you've said there. I totally believe Cronenberg peaked with Scanners and Videodrome, and De Palma definitely hit his peak with Dressed to Kill (it really is a brilliant film), but Carpenter's peak was definitely Halloween and IMO Craven's peak, ironically, was his first film. He just spiraled downwards from there. I'd say my preferred area in horror is about '72-'85. Roughly the same, I just think 1987 was the year the horror genre ate itself.

    ~Matt
     
  20. Grim

    Grim Well-Known Member

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    Well yes, the genre both destroyed itself and put out some of our favorite films in 1987, that's why I picked it as my endpoint. Prince of Darkness, Evil Dead 2, Hellraiser, Near Dark, The Lost Boys. I probably have just as many favorites from 1987 as I do any of the earlier years of the 80's, unfortunately with home video market becoming big and the slasher genre on its last limbs, there was just so much shit unloaded that the genre more or less self-destructed and things didn't really get better again (in terms of a consistent amount of good films) for about ten-twelve years.
     

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