The Slasher Genre...(wtf is going on?)

Discussion in 'Slashers' started by Matt89, Oct 10, 2008.

  1. Angelman

    Angelman OCD Blu Ray Collector

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    I am going to sound like a name-dropping dork if I get carried away. Tons of actors... either at Sundance or visiting sets. Well one of the more fun ones was Paul Verhoeven who I met when I was trying to get someone on that movie Black Book that he did, smart guy, very sweet...
     
  2. KR~!

    KR~! The Apocalyptic Kid

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    No it is not.:D
     
  3. bigdaddyhorse

    bigdaddyhorse Detroit Hi-on

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    I have this issue as well, although I still love most slashers, bad or not.
    I've noticed it more in sci-fi/fanatsy. When I was a kid (here I go dating myself again), 3 of my absolute favorite movies were Escape From New York, Flash Gordon, and Krull.
    So skip to the late 90's early 2000's and I revist all these old favs on dvd (Escape from NY was on laser due to the dvd at the time haven't no extras).
    Escape from New York I stil love, although even with that I could see some silliness which I never saw before.
    Flash Gordon. I couldn't even figure out why I liked it, it was that bad. I kinda started to see it (spaceships, adventures, babes) but the movie just did nothing for me and seemed outright gay.
    Krull, this was hit the worst as this movie is just plain dogshit throughout. Bored me to tears. Thankfully Flash Gordon was OOP at the time, so I losing that disc was easy and profitable on ebay. Krull I had to give away.

    The only slasher this has happened to was Trick or Treat. That flick did not hold up for me at all, although I can clearly see why I liked it at the time. Outcast metal kid with a rare album from his favorite band? Reminds me of when I swiped that promo tape for Ozzy's Ultimate Sin a month before the real album came out. I was the coolest fucking guy at school that month!:lol:
     
  4. Anthropophagus

    Anthropophagus Well-Known Member

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    Yep, I can empathize Matt, I recently sold off all my Nightmare On Elm Street sequels too. I watched Niagara with Marilyn Monroe a couple of weeks ago and still can't believe how much I enjoyed it. I never would've given it a chance a few years ago.
    I was the type of guy who would walk into FYE and just check the horror section and nothing else. It's much different now, I could hardly be bothered.
    I guess maybe the fact that mainstream horror has become so homogenized does not help, there's so little creativity. It's either torture porn, J-horror remakes or tepid slasher re-imaginings like Black Christmas. Not my cup of tea.
     
  5. spawningblue

    spawningblue Deadite

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    Well you guys can unload all your horror DVDs to me!:D I am somewhat in the business, although I graduated the TV side as opposed to film, but right now I am working at a film post production house, although I am not doing anything important. Anyways, i am enjoying horror films more and more each day! Maybe its because I haven't seen so many, and have been playing catch up for years, but every month I find a couple more gems that I never saw or even heard of for that matter. I enjoy some classic black and white films, but a lot of the older films I just can't get into. They are like watching sitcoms with laugh tracks. The sets and over dramatized acting just comes off as stage plays to me, instead of a movies. But to each his own i guess.

    As for the Amityville box set, I thought the extras on the bonus disc were pretty sweet. Two documentaries on the real family, one more of an account of what they say happened, and the other showing both sides of the story.
     
  6. Angelman

    Angelman OCD Blu Ray Collector

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    I'm a lot like you in that I had seen my fair share of horror films as a young kid but it wasn't until DVD blew up and I could get uncut widescreen horror that I really went deep. Now I feel like I have seen more horror films than I have not.

    I started watching older (30s through 50s) films maybe 3-4 years ago. If you start with the very cream of the crop and go from there you find yourself adjusting to rhythm and delivery of dialogue and action.
     
  7. spawningblue

    spawningblue Deadite

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    Yeah there are so many classics that I haven't seen that I probably shouldn't make that statement, Carnival of Souls and Nosferatu come to mind! But from what I've seen, I couldn't get into them as much. Citizen Kane is a great movie, but do i feel the need to run out and buy it? No. On the other hand I have Final Exam and Doom Asylum coming to me any day now. I guess I just prefer fun movies, and get more watching out of them then I do something like Kane.

    And although I need to give them another chance, the last time I saw some of the Universal monster flicks, Dracula especially, I was bored to tears and fell asleep several times before I finished it. That's not to say I have a short attention span, as the remake of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and The Changeling, are two of my favoruite movies.

    So yeah, I don't know. I guess like you said, I just need to see a lot more, and then make a decision. There's probably plenty of older films that I would love, as I do enjoy the original Haunting, House on Haunted Hill and Night of the Living Dead to name a few.
     
  8. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    Well, about Citizen Kane. I can see why you didn't think it was anything extraordinary. Neither did I when I first saw it. To be entirely honest, it really is a film that needs to be explained for you to completely understand why it's so great. (The types of shots he used, its VERY overt stylization. Reading up on it or even listening to the commentary by Roger Ebert on the DVD really help in understanding the movie better.)

    I never used to watch movies from the 30s/40s/50s either until I started studying them in school. It was an area of film I had never ventured upon and it was kindof overwhelming. I fell in love with movies, I guess you could say. :) I found other areas of film more interesting and horror ceased to interest me as much as it used to.

    And about the "over-dramatized" acting bit LOL. :D Funny you mention this, I personally find many actors today to be very "flat" in their acting techniques. As opposed to the "golden age of cinema" where you can name a LARGE number of extremely talented, many of them, outstanding actors: (Marlon Brando, Humphrey Bogart, James Dean, Elizabeth Taylor, Julie Harris, Montgomery Clift, Natalie Wood, Warren Beatty (although he came a little later), Paul Newman, Katharine Hepburn, Bette Davis, James Stewart, Janet Leigh, Audrey Hepburn, Judy Garland, Gene Kelly, Astaire and Rogers, Steve McQueen, Gary Cooper, Cary Grant, Rita Hayworth...the list goes on...) Today, you can barely name a handful of amazing actors. Who do we have? Possibly George Clooney, Susan Sarandon, James Franco, Robert DeNiro, Meryl Streep, but for many of these actors, even THAT'S going back a bit. (Their prime years, I mean.)

    I don't know, maybe watching all these older films and developing such a deep appreciation and adoration for them has caused me to think they're so much better than about 80-90% of movies that come out today, and right now I honestly believe this. I can accept the fact that we're never gonna see the likes of Casablanca ever again, but even still, bad films from the 30s/40s/50s are still nowhere NEAR as bad as bad films from today.

    ~Matt
     
  9. Angelman

    Angelman OCD Blu Ray Collector

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    Well, Dracula, in my opinion (and those of most experts) is not a good movie. If you like the original Night of the Living Dead I'd say its not a stretch to like Carnival or Souls. Nosferatu is OK. Most of the older (40s-early 60s) flicks I like are non-horror: Treasure of Sierra Madre, Casablanca, Seven Samurai, Double Indemnity, The Manchurian Candidate, The Killing - there are some gems in that list (again, in my opinion).
     
  10. spawningblue

    spawningblue Deadite

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    Actually I did read up quite a bit on it, and actually did a paper on it. There is definitely a lot to the film, and I enjoyed it a lot more once I studied the film. The whole fight to get the picture made is a movie itself (Actually they did a movie called RK0 on it), and yes, the stylish camera shots that were used were unheard of at the time. Many films and directors owe so much to Kane. It is definitely a film masterpiece, but it's still not something I could watch over and over again. As interesting as it is as a piece of cinema, and the history behind it, still doesn't change that at least for me it is kind of a dry film, that almost seems anticlimactic in the end. Again, don't take that as me bashing the film, as I am not. I just get more watch out of films like Friday the 13th or Army of Darkness then I do out of long dramas. I enjoy them as much as the next guy, but I have to be in the right mood to enjoy them, where as fun harmless films like Army of Darkness or Swingers for that matter I have watched countless times. I know that Citizen Kane is a much better film then those mentioned, but I personally have more fun watching mindless slasher films or whatever. But again, to each their own. I guess I have only really been hardcore into horror films for the past 4 or 5 years, so maybe I will too get bored with them and look for something more, but right now I am enjoying them so much, and have been finding more and more that I like.

    I do understand where you are coming from though, and am not knocking you one bit. Your movie tastes are just maturing. You get more out of a film that has a history to it, then one that was just made to entertain. I go through moods like that as well, and my movie tastes completely change. Right now I am just on a horror kick, and hope it doesn't die down any time soon as I am having so much fun with it. But maybe once I have seen all the best the genre has to offer, I too will look out for something else. I just think right now though, I have so much more to see in the genre before I tire of it.

    And I haven't given up on films from the 40s, 50s, and 60s. This year I have decided to check out all the Hammer films for the first time, next year I will go back and check out all the Universal horror films, and everything before them, such as Carnival and Nosferatu. Right now I have been on a mindless slasher rampage, and have been loving everything I have thrown in. Are they great films? Far from it! But damn, are they entertaining. It almost sucks for you in the sense that because you know so much about what makes a film good or bad, that you can't enjoy mindless drivel anymore for what it is. You need to get something more out of a film. After I graduated from college I too began to look at movies and TV shows a little different. Bad directing and lighting would stand out a little more for me then it should. It almost ruined movies for me, but now I have gotten over that and can just look past it, and enjoy a film for what it set out to be. Not every film was meant to be a masterpiece. Some films like most slashers, were just made to scare and thrill, and entertain, while others like Kane, were meant to stand the test of time, were meant to tell an important story or message.

    Anyways, I feel I have repeated myself on several occasions now, so I'm just going to stop there.
     
  11. spawningblue

    spawningblue Deadite

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    Sadly I have not seen any of those, including Casablanca :eek:. Seven Samurai is one I have been meaning to watch though, seeing how it had such an influence on George Lucas with Star Wars.
     
  12. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    Casablanca is a movie everyone must see before they die. ;)

    ...same goes for Double Indemnity.

    ~Matt
     
  13. spawningblue

    spawningblue Deadite

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    You're right. To be honest, there are so many older films that I have always wanted to see, but every time I go to purchase one, I grab a cheesy slasher or something instead. I think I really need to place an order sometime and just grab all the classics and spend a week watching them all and catching up, and then see how I feel after that. I promise, I will come to you guys to recommend me some classics sometime in the near future. I just need to be in that right mood set.
     
  14. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    Haha, that used to happen to me. But right now the exact opposite happens. I was in Sunrise today near Yonge & Dundas and I was gonna grab a horror movie cuz they have this $9.99 special on a bunch of titles. I found myself wandering over to to the (excellent) "Silver Screen" section at the back of the store and ended up getting Oliver!, Monkey Business and How to Marry a Millionaire. By the time I got around to the horror section I was like meh...fuck it and just paid for the other 3 movies.

    ~Matt
     
  15. shithead

    shithead Death By Ejaculation

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    You sellout!!
     
  16. Erick H.

    Erick H. Well-Known Member

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    Kurisawa's THE HIDDEN FORTRESS was a big influence on STAR WARS.
     
  17. Angelman

    Angelman OCD Blu Ray Collector

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    Oddly, I find HIDDEN FORTRESS very boring. SEVEN SAMURAI is awesome. My friends always joke that SEVEN SAMURAI is an excellent re-make of BATTLE BEYOND THE STARS (BBTS being a re-make of SS).

    And seriously, everyone should see CASABLANCA. I saw it first in a theater, so I was lucky. But if you want to get into those films, that is a GREAT place to start.

    Matt89 - have you seen Murnau's SUNRISE? If not, do yourself a favor and hunt it down. EXCELLENT film-making.
     
  18. Kim Bruun

    Kim Bruun Resident Scream Queen

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    A similar thing has happened to me - I've more or less grown out of Italian horror and gialli. Many of the ones I used to like feel stilted and clumsy, while others now lack intensity. I can barely get through anything Fulci (except Zombie, perhaps), and there are only a handful of gialli I still consider favourites.

    On the other hand, despite the repetitiveness of the genre, I still love slashers - slashers cemented my love for horror, and the slasher remains my indisputed favourite sub-genre. A truly great slasher can scare me even on a repeated viewing, and even a mediocre effort like Final Exam manages to entertain me. And I must add that I didn't see many of the slasher until my mid twenties, so it's not merely a case of nostalgia.
     
  19. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I've had the chance of seeing this in theatres, too. God, what an experience. When Max starts playing "As Time Goes By" and the camera cuts to Bergman's expression.....fuck man...THAT'S cinema! :D

    NO I haven't seen it! I've been meaning to see this movie for the LONGEST time now!!! It's been referenced a few times in my readings and I've wanted to check it out for some time now. It's that great, huh? Then I've just GOTTA check it out.

    Sad what happened to Murnau, though. What a shame. Funny what it says about 4 Devils on imdb, though. "This film is presumed lost. Please check your attic."

    ~Matt
     
  20. spawningblue

    spawningblue Deadite

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    Really? I don't know, I think as much as great as they are with the gore, its the atmosphere that really sucks me into his films. City of the Living Dead is a great example of that. it may not have the best story, but it just oozes atmosphere and is always a must watch in October for me.
     

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