what's the big deal about euro horror?

Discussion in 'Euro Horror' started by frightfan, Jul 22, 2003.

  1. RyanPC

    RyanPC Guest

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: what's the big deal about euro horror?

    Cannibal Ferox and Holocaust are two of my favorite movies. Way to go! :D
     
  2. hell ya!

    hell ya! ~Go ahead, make my day~

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    Re: Re: Re: what's the big deal about euro horror?

    I use amazon.com and .ca, .com is nice becuase there is no customs charges but you still gotta deal with exchange rates and such. I primarly use amazon.ca, they have great prices for pre-orders and free shipping. :banana:
     
  3. JW77

    JW77 Support Halliburton

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    I think one of the reasons people can only think of Bava, Argento, and Fulci is because the guys have such weird names -- or at least non-Anglo-Saxon names that we have difficult remembering. The mind can only hold so many of these things...

    I mean, I have all four Blind Dead films on DVD, but I'd have to look the director's name up. Ossario something...
     
  4. zombi3

    zombi3 Pure Evil

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    Try these - all are available on R1 dvd:

    Eaten Alive
    Hell of the Living Dead
    Rats-Night of Terror
    Zombie Holocaust
    Burial Ground
    Nightmare City
    Mountain of the Cannibal God
    Jungle Holocaust
     
  5. frightfan

    frightfan New Member

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    Isn't Eaten Alive by Tobe Hooper? (where some guy feeds undesirables to his crocodiles.)

    Also, I think you've got a couple of Bruno Mattei movies in there don' t you? I know that "Rats" is one... from what I have read, I don't think I want those anywhere near me they stink so bad :)

    And no one can get me to watch "Burial Ground" again... what are you trying to do to me? hehe

    But... I might watch Jungle Holocaust if I can find it to rent. They have Cannibal Holocaust down the street at Movie Warehouse, so I'll go have a look :) Thanks
     
  6. frightfan

    frightfan New Member

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    It's not that I don't know any... Bruno Mattei, Michele Soavi, Ruggero Deodato, Lamberto Bava, Pupi Avati, Ovidio Assonitis (i think that's his name...)... I have either seen films by them or been aware of them for many years. Mostly due to reading Fangoria all through the 90's.

    So, believe me... I am not ignorant of my own accord here.. I am ignorant for lack of opportunity to see the movies ... although I have been considering "Revenge of the Dead" (aka:Zeder) which is at my local vid store on VHS...
     
  7. Cydeous

    Cydeous Axxon N

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  8. RyanPC

    RyanPC Guest

    :eek:

    Eaten Alive is a cannibal film directed by Umberto Lenzi. Yes, there is one by Tobe Hooper, but this isn't it.

    DON'T, I repeat, DON'T go into these films if you don't like Argento or Fulci-- they are reputed to be bad films in the genre, in fact... so bad they're good. ;)

    Well, except for Jungle Holocaust. But even that isn't my favorite cannibal film. :p
     
  9. frightfan

    frightfan New Member

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    Was this directed at me? If so, thanks :) (I was asking for canadian dvd sites above)

    But I'm sure Ryan will appreciate it too, whoever he is :)
     
  10. RyanPC

    RyanPC Guest

    I don't know anything about it. I think he got things mixed up. ;)
     
  11. Luna

    Luna Guest

    :lol: I can't say the same for myself. Coming from a primarily Italian neighborhood, these names are more familiar to me than anything. Not that they're common surnames, but their first names definitely are, moreso. That's not really my point though. :D

    To respond to the original post, though... I think what did it for me was that I was exposed to Euro horror as a kid, thanks to Italian video store owners around the corner from my house. I've loved it since the 80s and it's just always been a part of my horror experience. It didn't take getting used to and it wasn't particularly exotic for me. I even grew up with some of the superstitions and the Catholicism. It just clicked with me in a way I can't quite explain. It was much different than the stuff being put out by American directors and seemed to offer a different cultural perspective on what's eerie and what's disturbing. I must say that I love the style of filmmaking too. Current American films seem to be so quick in cuts... MTV style, you might say. Going back to view these European films is a comforting, yet refreshing change from that. It's like these guys actually took the time to perfect their vision (ok, so I have Argento in mind here :D), and I can appreciate that. There are exceptions, naturally, but for the most part, they don't feel like they were done purely for the sake of the Almighty dollar, or lire or the franc or whatever other currency you like. They seem to me like they were done with true love for the craft. While plots may be (sorely) lacking in some cases, they usually more than make up for it in atmosphere, music and style. If they don't, then I don't care what country the movie came from... it's just a turd.

    This may all depend on what one values in their moviegoing experience, of course. I won't try to lie and say that some directors didn't only go for the out and out shock value, but hey, I can dig that too. I can respect someone who isn't afraid to let the blood flow or spurt or even gush in some cases. There's something very raw and primal about that sort of thing, which I think is missing in a lot of today's more mainstream horror. A perfect example of this would be the ending of
    Rollin's "Living Dead Girl"
    , which is a movie I love for all the reasons listed above. The ending is a heartwrenching thing to watch, in my opinion... truly tragic and one of the more memorably bloody things I think I've ever seen! I think it's a film that could only be made so effectively at that point in time, in that era, as is the case with plenty of Euro horror, in my opinion.

    Another one I'd have to use as an example is "The New York Ripper". I absolutely LOVE sleaze in my horror and the era is one that's rather nostalgic for me. I'm a sucker for 70s sleaze set in NYC because I lived there during that time and it's familar to me. Sleaze is another thing sorely missing from today's mainstream horror, in my opinion. There just isn't enough sleaze, dammit! :D

    Anyway, it's really hard for me to express what exactly makes one "get" Euro horror without rambling on for days to try to get to my point. I assume you get the idea though. In addition to what I said above, Euro horror has that certain intangible something that seems to be nonexistent in mainstream cinema today. I cannot put my finger on it right now, but I suppose that's what makes it intangible by definition. ;)
     
  12. Crystal Plumage

    Crystal Plumage Dig me..but don't bury me

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    Would you perhaps prefer English names like Mario Dribble and Dario Silver ?;)
     
  13. Luna

    Luna Guest

    :lol: :lol: :lol:

    Exactly! :D
     
  14. Tye

    Tye New Member

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    I have to admit that Argento & Bava have been the most influential in my euro-horror viewing (personally I think that Fulci is a bit overrated - but that's just my opinion)....however I would have to throw in both Pupi Avati and Jorg Buttgereit as euro-horror directors that I've come to admire.
     
  15. Trout

    Trout Guest

    How about Louis Fuller ("director" of "7 doors to death")? Or John M. Old (which I believe is a name Bava use).
     
  16. CJ

    CJ Guest

    The main differences I see between Euro horror and American horror movies is this: with the American movie, the audience sits back and the story is spoon-fed to them, explaining every little thing to them so as not to confuse them. Euro horror is not so straightforward and demands that the viewer puts in some work too. Euro horror makes you, the viewer, work things out - and I think this is why most people don't 'get it'. Obviously, not all Euro horror is like this (some are downright stupid, but enjoyable nonetheless).

    I think many people don't 'get' the Euro thing because they're so used to the American way of storytelling, whereas Euro horror comes from a different place entirely and has a rich history stretching back to the very beginnings of cinema and draws from a variety of influences, including the surrealists, which is why many Euro horror's tap into this whole 'style-over-substance' thing. It's a part of the Euro tradition, which is, of course, lost on many mainstream moviegoers due to their over-exposure to the 'American Way'.
     
  17. Yowie

    Yowie Hologram

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    Euro Hooray

    It's interesting that even the most downright stupid Euro horror is (usually) still more enjoyable than the most downright stoopid American horror, at least IMO. Really stupid Euro horror would be something like "Demons" or Deodato's "Dial: Help", and their American counterparts in stoopidity would be stuff like "C.H.U.D. II", or "Sleepaway Camp". (-Sorry to those who like these particular titles, I mean no harm ;).) While "Demons" is downright bad in every way, "Dial: Help" has an air of sophistication and a certain typical Italian style and flair the US titles do not possess, even if they're all pretty silly. I don't think a bigger budget would've helped any of the US titles, they're teen flicks and maybe they weren't the best titles to fairly pair as examples to Euro horror but I hope you get the picture. (Deodato's own "Body Count" is probably closer in spirit, and even that cheap dud is more amusing.) Euro horror is also a bit more theatrical, it just doesn't follow the same patterns of logic US horror does but I enjoy both worlds.
     
  18. Atmims

    Atmims Guest

    I betcha there are some REALLY stupid euro horror movies out there. We just don't see them most of the times because whos gonna bother subtitling or dubbing them?
     
  19. Cydeous

    Cydeous Axxon N

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    Luna, I feel exactly as you do but I couldn't put it into words as eloquently as you. I am Italian, living in Vancouver, so I can relate to how you grew up. All I can say is: where have you been all my life?
     
  20. Luna

    Luna Guest

    Thank you! :)
    Mostly in the Bronx, with plenty of Italian speaking neighbors. :lol:

    I've always loved euro horror but I especially love revisiting some of the old favorites nowadays. Either I'm getting old or there's too much crap out there now -- perhaps a little of both. ;)
     

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