When did Halloween mania start?

Discussion in 'General' started by ronnie21, May 5, 2017.

  1. ronnie21

    ronnie21 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    2,278
    Likes Received:
    125
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I was wondering when all the Halloween craze started? was it before part 2? or after, for example what iam trying to ask is, When did people start going nuts over the whole Michael myers craze we see today? Now the original played at most theaters around spring of 79 , and played at Halloween 79 and then re released in October of 80, the first time I ever saw it was its TV debut 1981, same night 2 hit theaters, The funny thing is it died down after part 3 till 4 came out,, then everyone got all hyped again.. mikes back !!!
    I think Halloween was originally released on VHS in 1980, but most people didn't have VCRS in 1980 . so maybe regular cable..
     
  2. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2001
    Messages:
    10,780
    Likes Received:
    658
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Keene, NH
    I guess I don't really understand the question. None of the sequels have ever come close to capturing the success financially of the original Carpenter film, so I guess the craze began way back then. As far as today goes: is there really a craze? It seems more a nostalgia trip than anything.
     
    zbinks likes this.
  3. buck135

    buck135 Kanamit

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2004
    Messages:
    4,304
    Likes Received:
    981
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    A dimension of sight, sound and mind.
  4. Anaestheus

    Anaestheus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2005
    Messages:
    1,605
    Likes Received:
    143
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Yeah, I don't get this either. The first film is still one of the most successful films ever made in terms of box office v. budget. But, none of the sequels ever came close to making what that one did in terms of profit. So, I don't know if there ever had been a "craze". I don't even think I would say that the franchise ever even had the same following as the F13 or Elm Street series. I'd even say that Michael's status as an icon really only comes from how impactful that first film was.
     
  5. wago70

    wago70 Surviving on nostalgia

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2001
    Messages:
    3,586
    Likes Received:
    105
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    San Francisco - down by them two ol' sheds
    I want to say Michael's mainstream fan-craze kicked into high gear around 1988 when the 4th film came out and was pretty popular. He did have a loyal following to readers of Fangoria before that, however. It seemed after Freddy became a mainstream sensation, other horror villains suddenly had similar appeal in the mid to late 80's.
    In 1979, I remember some kids at my school telling me about the movie and how good it was and what the saw. I wanted to see the movie so bad but when the opportunity came (Thanksgiving '79), I was outvoted by family members and we went roller skating instead. Horror seemed so inaccessible back then for some reason. Fangoria and Famous Monsters were a godsend.
    Anyway, when the 2nd movie came out, I seem to recall everyone taking to Jamie Lee Curtis rather than Michael...he was just "the killer" back then (as I saw it). I think the internet in the 90's and Freddy Mania helped out the most.
     
  6. scott71670

    scott71670 Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Messages:
    688
    Likes Received:
    56
    Trophy Points:
    28
    This movie was huge when it hit theaters. It was the start of the late seventies early eighties slasher craze. It wasn't so much for Halloween back then, but it signaled a craze for all these slasher films that occurred following its success. And here's the thing: There were no video rentals back then: if you wanted to see these movies, you had a week and a half to see it at the theater. But Halloween also made a huge mark being on television. I remember it getting a lot of fanfare when it first broke to HBO. Jaws did the same thing. This was back when you had to wait a few years (!) to see it on television. And when NBC ran Halloween with the extra footage, its legitimacy was sealed. And every time Carpenter released a new film, there was always a demand to see his older stuff. It was almost like Halloween, The Fog, The Thing, and Creepshow were somehow all sequels to each other in the public consciousness... Spielberg had the same treatment too.
     
  7. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2001
    Messages:
    10,780
    Likes Received:
    658
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Keene, NH
    Having only a week and a half to see a film was only true of the ones that were unpopular. I remember many, many films getting held over anywhere from 1 to 4 months! And the ones that didn't were fairly easy to see again because prints would hop around regionally. If you missed it in one theater then chances are good that it would play in one of the other theaters in town or the local drive in, or the next town over. A film like Halloween would have also had a second run the following year, too.
     
  8. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,678
    Likes Received:
    950
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Toronto
    Wasn't it not until the fall of 1979 that Halloween actually became popular? It was kind of a sleeper upon its original release, then Roger Ebert reviewed it a year later and compared it to Psycho and the general opinion of it changed, and then everyone tried ripping it off and that's what started the slasher craze.

    ~Matt
     
  9. ronnie21

    ronnie21 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    2,278
    Likes Received:
    125
    Trophy Points:
    63
    wago70 said it perfect. 1988!! with the 4th film, them bringing Michael back was what everyone always wanted and finally got it in fall of 88. It was big news when it broke that Michael was coming back! The movie did very well at the box office and everyone was talking about it. Also fall of 88 we had a Halloween adventure shop open in town (they must have been new ) and they had an actual Michael myers full head mask for like $50 and I ended up getting it , borrowed whatever money I didn't have to buy it cause $50 to a 15 year old was a lot of money for a mask. But I thought it was so cool to have it..So, i'am gonna say 1988 too, was what everyone always wanted they got mikey back. Funny thing is, I even said this at the time, they really waited too long to bring him back , 1981-1988 is a big gap. The could have done it in 1985 and it wouldn't have been that big a gap.. btw, didn't care for the 4th one, something was just missing.. For me it's 1 and 2.. and the story ended for me after 2..
     
  10. ronnie21

    ronnie21 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    2,278
    Likes Received:
    125
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I also remember being in 1st grade in fall of 79 and some kind in my school somehow saw it in the theater and was telling everyone about it, so that peaked my interest,
     
  11. chancetx

    chancetx Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2004
    Messages:
    853
    Likes Received:
    157
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I think Part 3 being non-Michael Myers upset a lot of fans and then the franchise went silent until the late 80s. So there was a huge amount of excitement when Halloween IV was announced and there was a lot of hope that a new Michael Myers movie might breath some life (ha!) into the dying slasher craze (Jason & Freddy were showing their age by then and the endless sequels had become punchlines.) Halloween and Michael Myers always seemed more highly regarded than Friday the 13th/Jason and a lot of people thought Halloween IV was going to restore Michael Myers to his proper place as the ultimate horror killer. (Freddy arrived much later on the scene and didn't seem to face the same direct comparison that Michael Myers and Jason Vorhees did.) Those were my impressions as a teenager at the time anyway.
     
  12. scott71670

    scott71670 Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Messages:
    688
    Likes Received:
    56
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Maybrick was right about many films being held over for months. I know I am getting a little off topic, but after Halloween there became this glut of cash grab (especially holiday tie-ins) horror films that were in and out of our local theater that you had to run to see them and you were glad you did. I am saying this as some folks would appreciate it: I remember short theatrical runs locally for Funeral home, Burial Ground, Mother's Day, Motel Hell, Prom Night, Happy Birthday to me, My bloody valentine, Don't go in the house (THAT was a different experience on a thirty foot screen!), The Shining, Ghost Ship (saw it on a double bill with Susan Anton in Goldengirl), Motel Hell and even the first Friday the 13th. We only had two theaters and that stuff got shoved out quick for stuff like Tootsie and Cannonball Run. God bless Halloween for jamming open that floodgate.
     
  13. ronnie21

    ronnie21 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    2,278
    Likes Received:
    125
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Theres an interesting book on this subject some of you may have read. called Blood Money, very good read and they are on the money about how these tie ins did at the box office..
     
  14. ronnie21

    ronnie21 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    2,278
    Likes Received:
    125
    Trophy Points:
    63

    Wow, how cool to have seen some of these in their prime on the big screen, that must have been some memories. cinema is very different today and that's a whole other subject. but wow scott..
     
  15. ronnie21

    ronnie21 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    2,278
    Likes Received:
    125
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Usually about a week or two tops these tie ins were in local theaters, mainly 1 week only..
     
    wago70 likes this.
  16. CPT HOOK

    CPT HOOK Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    Messages:
    5,917
    Likes Received:
    735
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    US
    Yes, this is discussed on most docs about the movie. I believe the movie opened regionally and slowly expanded throughout the country. So it wasn't this huge independent hit right out of the gate, it took a couple weeks to pick up steam. And even thought it was a huge crowd pleaser, it was critically dismissed until a few select critics (including Roger Ebert) applauded it, basically giving the rest of the mainstream critics permission to praise it.

    A Nightmare On Elm Street and The Evil Dead had similar openings, where they started small and expanded. Pretty crazy to think about, considering they're three of the most beloved genre films out there.
     
  17. wago70

    wago70 Surviving on nostalgia

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2001
    Messages:
    3,586
    Likes Received:
    105
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    San Francisco - down by them two ol' sheds
    It's funny, to me, seeing Halloween opening in some cities in February and April of 1979...:) It came to my hometown way after Halloween in 1978. Tiny newspaper ad! It's a classic now, but back then...that movie really had to work for its money. Well deserved classic.
     
  18. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2001
    Messages:
    10,780
    Likes Received:
    658
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Keene, NH
    It was definitely a different time. About a decade ago I returned to my home town and looked up old movie theater ads on microfilm at the library and came to the realization that I had to have gone to the movies at least once a week to see the films I remembered seeing. Today I doubt I make it out more than once every three months. There is almost no point any more given how fast the rollover is from theatrical to home video now.
     
  19. ronnie21

    ronnie21 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    2,278
    Likes Received:
    125
    Trophy Points:
    63
    My brother saw Halloween in the theater in 79 and said it was a real shock at the end that he was gone after being shot and falling off the balcony, and then the movie just ended.. That kind of ending was rare back then. Then , every rip off had the killer keep getting back up over and over... He also said that when Halloween II came out, it was a big hit at the box office, he said opening night October 30th 1981, there was a huge line to get in and almost didn't get a ticket for the first evening showing. then he said when everyone was leaving, there was another huge line for the next showing, old newspaper ads I printed shown that Halloween II played throughout the whole month of November that year... over exceeding the 2 week mark that most slashers held.
     
  20. maybrick

    maybrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2001
    Messages:
    10,780
    Likes Received:
    658
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Keene, NH
    I remember always coming out to a full lobby of people waiting for the next showing. With the exception of event movies, I virtually never see that anymore.
     

Share This Page