Which 80's horror vet's movies hold up best today?

Discussion in 'Site Polls' started by rhett, Jun 27, 2010.

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Which Modern Horror Director's Classics Hold Up Best Today?

Poll closed Jul 27, 2010.
  1. Dario Argento

    8 vote(s)
    7.0%
  2. John Carpenter

    51 vote(s)
    44.7%
  3. Wes Craven

    5 vote(s)
    4.4%
  4. David Cronenberg

    30 vote(s)
    26.3%
  5. Brian De Palma

    2 vote(s)
    1.8%
  6. Lucio Fulci

    3 vote(s)
    2.6%
  7. Tobe Hooper

    2 vote(s)
    1.8%
  8. George A. Romero

    13 vote(s)
    11.4%
  1. rhett

    rhett Administrator

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    Argento, Romero, Hooper, Fulci, Cronenberg, DePalma, Carpenter, Craven. We're always hearing stories of their "better days", but looking at their classics now, which director's better days hold up best today?
     
  2. Dobby

    Dobby Well-Known Member

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    As much as I love all those directors. I have to give my vote to John Carpenter. His movies were way ahead of they're time. Dario Argento comes in a very close second.
     
  3. msw7

    msw7 Re-animated member

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    It was a really tough call for me between Argento (Suspiria, Tenebre) and Romero (Night, Dawn, Day). I finally flipped a mental coin and came down with Argento (not to make it sound like a disease....). Although, of all of the movies I considered for these two maybe only one was made in the 80s.

    Why isn't Stuart Gordon on the list though? He might have gotten my vote for Re-Animator and From Beyond.

    Sam Raimi?
     
  4. Shlockjock81

    Shlockjock81 New Member

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    My feelings are the same.
     
  5. Katatonia

    Katatonia Hellbound Heart

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    Same here, Dobby summed it up nicely.
     
  6. rhett

    rhett Administrator

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    I thought of Raimi, but really, like Don Coscarelli, his golden era of horror filmmaking is really only defined by a single series, and both would work extensively outside the genre, too. Gordon I had on the list, but took him off because he sort of came later in the game after all the "Masters" had already made their mark.
     
  7. X-human

    X-human I ate my keys

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    Cronenburg easily:

    Dead Ringers (1988)
    The Fly (1986)
    The Dead Zone (1983)
    Videodrome (1983)
    Scanners (1981)

    Book ended with The Brood and Naked Lunch, there's just no competition in my mind.
     
  8. KamuiX

    KamuiX The Eighth Samurai

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    Quoted for truth.
     
  9. Anaestheus

    Anaestheus Well-Known Member

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    I say Cronenberg easily as well.

    Carpenter and Argento both have an original style that will always hold up over the years to come. But I think the intelligence of Cronenberg always makes his films more rewarding as time goes by.
     
  10. SaviniFan

    SaviniFan I Have A Fetish

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    Another Cronenberg vote. Not only does his films hold up well, he has not directed a clunker yet in my eyes where the others have.
     
  11. meljon

    meljon New Member

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    This is a very good poll. I think there all great, but as far as still holding up today it's either Carpenter or Cronenberg. I feel like most of their films have gotten better with time. My brothers and I always used to debate which is greater, to have a list of really good films(Carpenter,Cronenberg) or one film that's considered as an all time classic and a list of ok films(Romero,Hooper).
     
  12. _pi_

    _pi_ Peace, bitch

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    I will say John Carpenter. The more I think about it, the more I admire the man. Not only did he cover a LOT of different ground in his films - genre and plotwise - but he did so in his own unique and very identifiable style. Plus, his films are just a joy to behold. They've all got a classy look, good stories, great performances and - best of all - take themselves as seriously as they need to.

    Cronenberg is much more hit-and-miss for my taste. Even some of his 'classics' I have a hard time enjoying (I'm looking at you, Scanners and The Dead Zone!)

    For me, the runner up would be either Argento or Fulci. I might even veer towards Fulci, because frankly his films are more crazy fun.
     
  13. dave13

    dave13 Well-Known Member

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    With all due respect to each and every other filmmaker on that list (and i really do love them all), Cronenberg is just in a different class.
     
  14. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    Cronenberg definitely. Carpenter comes close, but even his films (Escape From New York, Halloween) have dated quite a bit, ESPECIALLY Halloween. As much as I love Halloween and I think it's a masterpiece for its time, it has seriously dated. His early films are very well made, but that doesn't necessarily mean his films were ahead of their time. Halloween ultimately gets too much credit (he ripped of Black Christmas), Assault on Precinct 13 was a remake of Howard Hawks' Rio Bravo, The Fog was just just another ghost story, etc. While they are well made films, no doubt, to say he was ahead of his time IMO gives him way too much credit. Tobe Hooper's Texas Chainsaw Massacre was ahead of its time, Craven's Last House on the Left was ahead of its time, Romero's Night of the Living Dead and Dawn of the Dead were ahead of their time. Halloween? Not so much.

    ~Matt
     
  15. dave13

    dave13 Well-Known Member

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    I agree, although i don't think that its a negative comment. A film thats ahead of its time is never fully appreciated until later. Halloween was recognized immediately and made a huge impact. It was perfect for its time.
     
  16. Body Boy

    Body Boy Well-Known Member

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    I agree. Halloween is vastly overrated, and is just a weaker version of Black Christmas in my opinion. People look at it as this amazing entity because of what it started, but if it was released in 1981/1982, it would probably become nothing more than a Final Exam. Appreciated by many, but simply not given another glance. I'm one of the few people who think that Friday the 13th 1980 is better shot, and an overall better movie than Halloween. I feel like people just love the setting and killer so much that they will look past so much. Oh well...
     
  17. Iron Jaiden

    Iron Jaiden New Member

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    Exactly. And if you depart from the 80s a tad and toss in his early classics Shivers and Rabid it's impossible to deny the man's genius.
    Only Kubrick would have me voting otherwise :)


    Ps. If every John Carpenter movie were of the same quality as his outstanding The Thing I'd have a shrine to the man in my living room, sadly that's just not the case.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2010
  18. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    The thing that stands out the most for me about Cronenberg is that for one thing, he BECAME a good and even better filmmaker, and didn't go the opposite way (like Craven did) and the man has made consistently good films from the beginning of his career, up until his most recent stuff. His obsession with disease and the human body is a theme he's been able to incorporate into almost every film of his, and successfully, I might add.

    ~Matt
     
  19. Myron Breck

    Myron Breck BOO!!! Gotcha!

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    Cronenberg.

    XHuman and Matt89 already stated my case much better than I could have done myself. Thanks, guys!
     
  20. rhett

    rhett Administrator

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    Whoa. WHOA. I can accept that Halloween has dated. I can accept that it rips off Black Christmas. But poorly shot compared to Friday the 13th? You crazy, dawg. Cundey's use of color, the pioneering glidecam shots and that expertly decorated 2.35:1 frame certainly walk all kinds of circles over Cunningham's endeering little cheapie. Friday the 13th has the benefit of those colorful New Jersey leaves and thick wilderness, but from a technical standpoint it's night and day. Hell, a major portion of that movie is underexposed! Come on, let's talk sense. Halloween dated...okay. But the cinematography is awesome.
     

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