Which Post Friday the 13th film is the best?

Discussion in 'Slashers' started by snowbeast323, Nov 24, 2008.

  1. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    Okay I have to add some input here. You're not understanding the musical, or at least - you're not looking at it from the proper perspective. You're arguing that musicals are "unrealistic". But, that's just the point, it's a MUSICAL. The reason the cast somehow knows the chorus to a seemingly random song is because these people are IN A MUSICAL. It's entirely realistic, within the realms of its genre. If you notice, the songs in most musicals (like West Side Story - which, is arguably the greatest musical ever made next to say, Singin' in the Rain) advance the plot. Listen to them, they do. There is a purpose to them. They have that "supernatural" - as you put it - aspect to them which is what makes them what they are. It is definitely not a flaw. The popularity of musicals, however arose out of the advent of sound. It was like, "Hey! Look what we can do with sound and music! People can move and dance to the beats and melodies of the songs!" And well...they evolved it from there (to a point where the genre reached absolute brilliance with Gene Kelly and his "masterpiece" Singin' in the Rain. The mother of all musicals, and in actuality, the beginning of the end.)

    You have to take the musical as probably the most fantastical type of filmmaking there is. The entire cast moves and dances with synchronicity, yes, but that is the film's intent. You can't really say "they're not realistic" because that's now how they're supposed to be viewed. (Trust me, I used to think the same thing about musicals.) They're meant to be viewed and understood as being realistic within the realms and parameters of its genre. And remember, song and dance in most musicals (it was a style that was developed later - DEFINITELY relevant to West Side Story) are designed to seize the opportunity to give great emphasis to important turning points/advancements to the film's plot. And since the characters in these films act as "causal agents", (the narrative only moves forward due to their actions) by singing and dancing to the songs, they do indeed advance the plot. Even if you look at the sets to many of these films, they're very simplistic, but you recognize that as as shop, or a house, or a barn. Their use of verisimilitude - giving the appearance that the set is real, but having it be simple enough so that it does not detract the viewer from the characters, the story or the music - is another key element to a musical (and classical Hollywood filmmaking in general) that makes it what it is. Sure it's not "realistic", even though anyone can argue what is and what isn't "realistic" in any film, but it is realistic ENOUGH in so much as it complies with the rules and styles of the musical genre, and MAKES it what it is.

    However, some musicals act more show-offy, like For Me and My Gal (1942), Summer Stock (1950), A Star is Born (1954), Meet Me in St. Louis (1944)etc, but still gain their reputation due to their careful direction, precise camerawork, exemplary storytelling and excellent choreography. (Judy Garland was a popular "show-off" item for MGM.) And yes, all those movies I mentioned there just so happen to be Judy Garland films, go figure.

    But yeah, hopefully that helps you understand the point of and intent of the movie musical LOL. I had to say something... :D

    ~Matt
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2008
  2. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

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    Haha, it's cool man. It's just that some people don't understand the point of them, and then they go off on how they're "unrealistic" when really...that was never the point of them to begin with. :D

    I guess you can say I've gained an appreciation for them, as they were quite culturally relevant to early American cinema, and it grows on you to the point where you (well at least I) began to actually enjoy them.

    ~Matt
     
  3. Cardiac Tom

    Cardiac Tom Guest

    The Burning for me...

    Surprised no one mentioned Class Reunion Massacre (well, that was before F13th) or The Mutilator...those are up there for me...

    Nice to see someone mentioned Intruder as well...that gets overlooked...
     

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