Who or What got you into foreign horror movies?

Discussion in 'Euro Horror' started by Horrorphilly, Aug 24, 2009.

  1. Horrorphilly

    Horrorphilly Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Messages:
    903
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Sitting here watching Burial Ground (Zombi 3) I was thinking of when I got into foreign movies,Italian to be exact.I would love to hear your guys experiances also.During my first marriage.I was starting my horror collection and only had NOTLD '68 and Halloween on vhs and had never even known that Italians made films nor did I care.I was wife my ex wife over her girlfreinds parents house and her freinds father had a sealed vhs of Zombi 2 or Zombie Flesh Eaters and thought the cover looked neat( it wasnt the iconic zombie we all know and love) I popped it in my player and when the cop scene at the begining came on and the big zombie rips the cops neck apart.I was FLOORED! I mean it was so intense and I remember thinking that none of the american horror movies I had seen were nothing like this.I then became hooked to the AOL horror chat room and I heard names like Lucio Fulci and Dario Argento and had no idea who any of these guys were.I used to go to this mom and pop video store near our house and they were selling there vhs stock and low and behold they had a MAGNUM vhs Zombie clamshell.I was actually a cut box sized to fit into a clamshell.I got into collecting horror dvds late in the game I guess.I started when Anchor Bay and Elite were the kings of horror and I saw that the first pressing of Zombie was going for 50.00 and above on ebay and wasnt going to pay them prices.I had this buddy I used to work with and he was a horror affiacianado to me.He had the Creature Feature vhs releases of Gates of Hell and Night of the Zombies.Both transfers were dark to the point of not being able to see anything, but they still satisfied my urge for gore.I traded for a vhs dub of Zombie 3, it was a jap bootleg and thought the movie rocked and to this day it is still one of my top 10 zombie films.Ive become a lover of Italian horror films of all sorts.

    I know there are plenty of typos but it shouldnt matter.Tell me your first experiance.

    Sean
     
  2. dave13

    dave13 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2008
    Messages:
    5,486
    Likes Received:
    485
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    for me it was two horror-themed websites that i visited regularly in the late 90's: DiabolicalDominion and CreatureCorner. Growing up in a small town my local video stores didn't have much selection, so i couldn't discover anything on my own, and none of my friends at the time were really into horror movies. so when i stumbled on these two websites (once i finally got dial-up internet) all the movies they were talking about were completely foreign (heh) to me. I think the DiabolicalDominion guys where the ones who were really into hammer and argento. without those sites i wouldn't have heard of half the movies i have in my collection today.
     
  3. old-boo-radley

    old-boo-radley They stay the same age...

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2004
    Messages:
    1,869
    Likes Received:
    36
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Saskatchewan
    For me, it was when I saw the covers to Zombie and House by the Cemetery online. With great shots like that and the promise of mucho gore, I had to give it a shot. The Beyond never had a super fascinating cover, but the plot sounded right up my alley. I can still remember getting my first batch of Italian horror on VHS. They were Zombie, New York Ripper and Demons 1/2. Ripper was pretty weird for me at the time, Zombie was cool and I liked Demons enough, but I still wasn't quite convinced. I just had to get the Lucio Fulci Vol. 1 Collection with The Beyond and House by the Cemetery and I figured it would either make or break Italian horror for me. It was all I needed to become an addict and come to like the other titles I already had a lot more.
     
  4. spawningblue

    spawningblue Deadite

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2004
    Messages:
    5,069
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    It was actually this site that got me hooked back in 2004. Don't know how I ended up on here. I think i was looking for info on the Friday the 13th movies or something. I had given up on horror movies since I was a child, thinking they were cheesy and stupid, with an exception to the Friday series which for some reason I always loved. Maybe because they are like action movies in the sense that they never let up and are never boring.

    Anyways, this site got me hooked back on horror and peaked my interests in the Italian genre. Soon after I placed a huge order from DD during one of their 20% sales ($300+ I believe) consisting of mostly horror films. I'm sure most of them were American films but I know among them were some Fulci's and Argento's as they interested me the most. I figured I would give them a try to test the foreign market. Thank god I started out with the best as since then I never looked back. I know some of my first purchases were Suspiria, Deep Red, Zombi and The Walking Dead Fright Pack which had many foreign classics in it. I then remember going giallo crazy as well and ordering a bunch of those. Actually probably my favourite foreign horror films were all some of my first, Suspiria, Deep Red, Zombi, City of the Living Dead, and Demons.

    Sorry if I got off track a bit, but yeah it was this site 5 years ago that made me check out foreign horror films and got me back into the horror genre in general. Thanks guys! haha
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2009
  5. Ash28M

    Ash28M Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2002
    Messages:
    6,064
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Mississauga, ON, Canada
    As a kid the only foriegn horror film I remember watching was Demons I remember looking at the cover for Zombie many times but the cover was a bit too scary to actually rent:). Even then I didn't know they were foreign until years later. The first one I knew was foreign must either of been Cannibal Holocaust or Suspiria. This was in the late 90's trying to find out on the web which horror films were either well regarded and or notorious. The first subtitled horror film I watched was either Ringu or Thesis i'm not positive which.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2009
  6. The Chaostar

    The Chaostar Johnny Hallyday forever

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Messages:
    4,291
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Hell-as
    Argento got me into cinema in general when I was 12. I think that says it all. I never thought much of cinema before but whenever I entered a VHS rental store I found myself, as a kid, always checking those grizzly covers of the early 80s... and could not get myself to sleep at nights. So I started renting them to see if these films promised what was on the cover - these images where so fascinating. After seing a lot of them, I picked SUSPIRIA since I have heard Argento's name before - in Europe these years he still was considered an auteur and you could know him just like a person who while not into cinema, has heard of, let's say Fellini or Coppola.
    Thankfully now that I think of it, the greek VHS was letterboxed. I fell so in love with SUSPIRIA that I loved cinema and decided that I wanted to study film theory & direction. Today I happen to write for the 1st in circulation greek daily newspaper, have a radio show and write in 4 other publications and, in a way, I owe everything I have done to Dario Argento.
    Now you know how it felt when I finally met him.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2009
  7. Angelman

    Angelman OCD Blu Ray Collector

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2004
    Messages:
    3,603
    Likes Received:
    1,139
    Trophy Points:
    113
    2 movies:

    #1 - Make Them Die Slowly. I was 14 and the bass player in my band told me about it (around '86?) Told me it was banned in 31 states (or whatever). I was FLOORED when I saw it. Not a good movie, in fact very bad, but that was the intro.

    # 2 - Fulci's ZOMBIE. The local vid store was alphabetized and wound around the store so that the "A"s and "Z"s were in the front by the door. That cover of Zombie, and the pictures on the back blew me away. I was totally fascinated when I saw the film and it is easily top 5 for me.

    Also there was a series of two books called John McCarty's Splatter Movie Guide that had descriptions of Fulci, Lenzi, Argento flicks. That was the "door-opener"
     
  8. msw7

    msw7 Re-animated member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Messages:
    1,699
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Brigid Fitch, USA
    I have no firm memories of making the distinction -
    I think my interest in Chinese movies came from renting them in college (in New York, with friends who had the dirt on the latest from Hong Kong). This was in the golden age of Cat. III movies in the early nineties, so I even saw some in the theaters in chinatown.

    Naked Killer was my first, and still one of my favorites.

    For European movies I think it was just seeing them in the video stores occasionally and hearing bits and pieces about them in magazines. I think Living Dead Girl was my first Rollin film. The Emmannuelle (Gemser) movies were all over cinemax when I was a teenager, and so very hard to resist. Daughters of Darkness I remember renting when I was 15 or so from a local video store (my parents were inattentive/permissive - at about the same time I remember hearing a rumor about an x-rated cut of Dawn of the Dead, and sending my dad to the video store to try to find it is somewhat surreal in hindsight - the people in the store had no idea what he was talking about; he had no problem with me watching extremely gory movies.)

    There is (was?) a great video store in San Diego that had tons of foreign films (VHS) - that was how I first saw movies like Torso, Trauma, Suspiria, etc.

    I think it was just that I loved horror movies, and wanted to see as many as possible. I just didn't care where they were from, as long as they were good/entertaining.
     
  9. Franco

    Franco Weekender

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2004
    Messages:
    2,456
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Peru
    I got into foreign horror movies because Peru doesn't produce horror movies, only dramas and comedies. :mad:
     
  10. X-human

    X-human I ate my keys

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    7,947
    Likes Received:
    687
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Illinois
    ...Does Britain count? I would say the AMC Hammer Halloween marathon is probably the earliest time foreign horror really grabbed my attention. Brides of Dracula was the film that struck me the most from that marathon. As for foreign language... I'm not sure. I'd always been aware of foreign films since I was a kid, mostly Japanese. I'd see Nosferatu '22 and '79 young enough that I can't really put a finger on a date.

    I was also very aware of Mario Bava because of Black Sabbath taking their band name from his film, as well as seeing Bava done on MST3k. But I didn't actually see my first Bava horror film, Planet of the Vampires, until many years later. But the first horror movie I bought was probably House By the Cemetery. Turned out to be a bootleg. :D
     
  11. Erick H.

    Erick H. Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2004
    Messages:
    9,403
    Likes Received:
    135
    Trophy Points:
    63
    My first exposure to international horror films probably came from our old local "horror host" on late night TV,DOCTOR MADBLOOD'S MOVIE.As a kid I would stay up late on Saturday night with a big Dr. Pepper and a bag of Doritos and take in the likes of Mario Bava's BLACK SABBATH,all manor of British imports (Hammer,Amicus,Tigon) and the occassional Japanese monsterfest.My first "non-giant monster" horror film was probably THE EVIL OF FRANKENSTEIN,I already knew Peter Cushing from STAR WARS.As I got into my teens it seemed like American horror was getting played out,endless sequels and watered down horrors that were afraid to be really frightening and so resorted to cracking a few bad jokes almost as an apology for any stray scares they might have generated.I longed for ''the real thing" and thankfully I was at the tail end of the days when you still might actually be able to catch an Italian horror import in the theater or even a drive-in.I caught whatever I could ,gonzo imports over the years that ranged from DEMONS to DEAD ALIVE,all at our local grindhouse (in the ''bad" part of town,not always easy for a kid).As video and later DVD became readily available all manner of treasures became available to me and my buddies and I crowded around (increasingly larger and larger) TV screens to see horrors big and small,good ,bad and baffling,from all over the globe.I ate it up ! To this day I'd rather seek out an oddball screening of some twisted horror indie or import at an arthouse or lateshow than shell out good money to see this weeks new remake or a ''safe'' little horror designed by a studio bean counter instead of a filmmaker.Foreign horror is addictive.If you catch the bug at an early stage of your life it sticks with you.Just don't be afraid to look beyond your shores to find the good stuff.You CAN get used to dubbing and as far as I know nobody has ever died when forced to read subtitles.Trust me,you'll eventually get more out of it than you put in,it pays off to keep an open mind.
     
  12. f.ramses

    f.ramses sociopath

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    1,059
    Likes Received:
    81
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    region 0
    I always liked horror movies but most of the tapes at the store that attracted my attention the most with their awesome packaging were ones I couldn't rent and I never forgot the artwork or the titles (movies like Make Them Die Slowly, The Beyond (as 7 Doors to Death), The Gates of Hell, Dr. Butcher MD, etc...). I did get to rent all of the Elvira hosted Thriller Video tapes that the stores had, most of which were British. Around 4th grade I discovered the bargain bins of used tapes that most video stores had, although I wasn't allowed to rent these movies not having to return them meant I could see them if I could just sneak them past my parents and get them into the house! My first tape was Buried Alive, I was amazed by this movie because I'd never seen anything so messed up and I'd never forget the name Joe D'Amato! That was pretty much it for a while until I discovered horror conventions and the internet came a long. I noticed some of the artwork I remembered on the tables of people who sold dubs and would occasionally see an original for sale at the conventions and online I found a small forum where everyone was into these movies and I learned all about what was out there and the directors as well as found trade lists and places to mail order dubs. Most of the movies sounded a lot better than much of the stuff that was available in stores at the time, a lot more extreme and entertaining, so I just kept on ordering after I'd seen the movies I remembered not being able to rent.
     
  13. hellraiser40

    hellraiser40 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Messages:
    919
    Likes Received:
    36
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Helchteren, Belgium
    Zombie 4 : After Death

    i rented it when i was about 15-16 years old, it had a cover saying 'Return Of The Living Dead Part III' so i was a bit surprised i got it home, seeing it had nothing to do with that series

    i also REALLY hated it and was bored with it, but it's the starting point, i guess somehow something must have been triggered in my mind :D
     
  14. Grim

    Grim Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2002
    Messages:
    7,669
    Likes Received:
    109
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    I saw the cover for the Anchor Bay clam shell case of The Beyond and thought it looked like some foreign horror themed Raiders of the Lost Ark knock off. I bought it and loved it, so basically from there on out I would go into Suncoast's VHS section and pick up every Anchor Bay film in a clam shell case that I could find. Probably about two years later I got into DVD.
     
  15. Yowie

    Yowie Hologram

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2001
    Messages:
    868
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Palookaville
    As far as Italian horror goes, starting with the Demons films might not convince too many it'll be worthwhile, pretty poorly made films IMO. For myself it was the early/mid 80s VHS renting time of Fulci galore, such as Zombie and City of the Living Dead. TV also showed things like Hammer and Bava's Black Sabbath all the time.
     
  16. Blastfighter

    Blastfighter New Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2009
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    My first experience of Italian horror, was seeing Fulci's Zombie 2. I was only 12 at the time. My dad reluctantly rented it. And I was totally hooked after watching it. I watched it 3 times before my dad took it back. Since then ive been an Italian horror junkie.
     
  17. wago70

    wago70 Surviving on nostalgia

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2001
    Messages:
    3,590
    Likes Received:
    105
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    San Francisco - down by them two ol' sheds
    For me, it took years of warming up to. I first saw ZOMBIE in 1981 (paired with BOOGEYMAN and BLOOD BEACH) and, although I recall the film being glossy and professional on the big screen, the VHS from Wizard opened my eyes to the dreadful dubbing (to my ears then).
    I avoided any foreign flicks until I saw CREEPERS on VHS (yes, Argento) and I liked it very much. A late night showing of DEEP RED on TV also was appealing. I gave HOUSE BY THE CEMETERY a VHS viewing and liked it well enough.
    The clincher, however, was a theatrical screening (the first night!!!!) of DEMONS in September of 1986. I hated it, but went again to see it and enjoyed it more. I was hooked on Italian horror from then on.
     
  18. Harry Warden

    Harry Warden Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2008
    Messages:
    3,848
    Likes Received:
    1,105
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Hermitage, Pennsylvania
    My first introduction to foreign horror came for watching cable TV in the 1970's. Cable was not nearly as regulated as it is now, and we would get stations from New York, Phily, Pittsburgh, Cleveland and Akron/Canton that played horror films all the time. They were often unedited and every one of these markets had their own horror TV hosts. Ghoulardi and Big Chuck & Houliahn from Cleveland, Chilly Billy in Pittsburgh (he is the TV reporter in the original NOTLD; his daughter Lori was the lead in Day), etc.. My first italian horror film was Baron Blood by Mario Bava but I was also introduced to British Horror (Hammer, Amicus, etc.) and Japanese Kaiju (Godzilla, etc.), so I was introduced to foreign horror at a very young age and always loved them so I quickly searched on my own for an info I could gather on the artists behind them. Famous Monsters helped some, but Fangoria and the video age brought them home and I sought out many of these films as I expanded my knowledge of their work. I have a lot of fond memories of discovering films I'd never seen by Fulci, Argento, Bava and the like and I've never looked back. :D
     
  19. Hatchetwarrior

    Hatchetwarrior Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2007
    Messages:
    1,791
    Likes Received:
    352
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Farmingdale, New York
    I remember growing up catching a couple of the old Hammer films from the 60's and 70's, but it wasnt until my teens that I really started to branch out into foreign film. I remember recieving a copy of Zombie for Christmas and was hooked. Since then I've collected serveral Fulci films, Suspiria, as well as a bunch of Japanese horror flicks (primeraly Takashi Miike) and of course the amazing films coming out of France (High Tension, Inside, Martyrs) and Spain (Rec, The Orphanage) and let's not forget Sweden's Let The Right One In.
     

Share This Page