Who Saw Her Die?

Discussion in 'Euro Horror' started by Andrew, Jun 21, 2002.

  1. Andrew

    Andrew Guest

    Yet again, wow. Excellent film full of unnerving visuals, wonderful acting, and an EXTREMELY haunting score. Is it on vinyl or anything anywhere? I don't own a single film score (aside from SUSPIRIA and OPERA, but those came with the LE's), but this is brilliant work by Morricone.

    Like Lado's SHORT NIGHT, I am yet again left confused, although not as much so as before.

    SEMI-SPOILER................was the man who got caught on fire and was thrown out of the building the Priest? or a different character?........END

    As for the film itself, it's magnificent. Lado's focus on the characters is perfect, and Lazenby is excellent as well. I don't really have enough good things to say about this one.

    Even if THE BLOODSTAINED SHADOW sucks, I'm still overjoyed at how good these films are.
     
  2. Who Saw Her Die is an awesome movie. I love the first scenes, where the girl gets beaten to death in the snow, supercool stuff - and the score is really effective! Lots of frantic female choirs - scary stuff.

    Check out What They Done To Your Daughters, for more of the same! I think it's better than Solange.
     
  3. dwatts

    dwatts New Member

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    I watched this one again tonight, after quite some time. This is the first time I've watched it projected too.

    I remember liking this one (and the Bloodstained Shadow for that matter), but you all know what it's like to visit a second time, when things are not quite so new.

    For me, this film actually grew in stature. The wonderful locations are stunning. Actually, for once, the location should have won a credit all to itself, since it dominates the film, and plays a part in it's ambiance.

    Yeah, good performances, nice soundtrack etc. Rather predictable climax (although don't forget, I have seen it before). All round wonderful, imo.

    I intend to revist the entire "Giallo collection", and this is the first one - randomly - picked out of the hat. Great stuff. Look forward to more.

    Oh, and goodness knows when "What Have They Done to Our Daughters" is going to get another DVD release, but I too heartily recommend it. I have the R2 DVD, and it will tide me over under something better comes out. Surely Shriek Show or someone could/should grab it....
     
  4. life_o_petey

    life_o_petey Guest

    I haven't watched any of the movies in the box set for a second time, but i enjoyed all of them quite a bit the first time around.
     
  5. John Gargo

    John Gargo Guest

    Superb film, my favorite from the Giallo boxset. I agree on the comments on the locations... they're used brilliantly, and I was reminded more than once of another beautifully directed thriller that took advantage of it's Venice backdrop, DON'T LOOK NOW.
     
  6. dwatts

    dwatts New Member

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    Don't Look Now is obviously going to be compared, since it uses the same location and theme (tragic loss of a child). Strangely (or maybe not) Who Saw Her Die and Don't Look Now came out around the same time (WSHD in 72, Don't Look Now in 73).

    Apart from the obvious (location and central theme) there were even some other striking simularities. For instance, in both films, the initial grief of losing a child led to the couple having passionate sex (though thankfully, the WSHD sequence didn't go on endlessly, as the DLN DVD version seems to do).

    In both films though, it is the location that dominates. What a pity Argento couldn't make his film there (if I remember correctly, because it was to difficult/expensive?)

    Out of the two films, I feel as though WSHD used the location the best, although the focus is different. In WSHD, the main characters appear to be natives, or at least to bevery familiar with the city. In DLN, the central cast is clearly just visiting (for however long).

    Not to mention, of course, that the child in DLN didn't die in the city.

    So famailiar yes, and the parallels go beyond the location. I wish I'd thought to map it out a little more as I was watching it, but I simply took it for granted that the films were similar, and never gave it a second thought.

    I should give DLN another view soon. The last time I watched it I was very much let down. It just didn't do anything for me at all (previous viewings had been good). Maybe it was a mood thing....
     
  7. John Gargo

    John Gargo Guest

    You really should... I picked up the DVD recently and it has quickly become one of my favorite films of all time, certainly in the top 10. I found the story to be engrossing, the direction is top-notch, the sets (as we have discussed) are wonderful, and the film very well acted.

    Most striking, however, is the film's horror element, which seems to linger just beneath the surface and only occassionally peeking through... the film has this bizarre mood about it, and while at face value it deals with the possibility of communicating with a dead spirit via a medium, these scenes appear to be handle quite superficially and they offer little other than novelty oddness. More importantly is the serial killer motif that runs throughout the film, and while we are often hinted at it, the film never actually asserts that it's an integral aspect to the story. Those afformentioned moments of horror that manage to emerge are often fleeting glimpses of something in a red coat, and I found it particularly effective.

    And of course, there's that ending... the visceral shock was so great that I actually YELPED! I let out a cry of genuine shock because the scene just works so wonderfully well, and yes, on different levels and things tie in together thematically, but just the visceral SHOCK of the scene was enough to really rattle me, and I consider myself to be jaded. What an ending...
     

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