Your Opinions on 60hz vs. 120hz HDTVs

Discussion in 'High Definition' started by DanceEnergy24, Jan 1, 2011.

  1. DanceEnergy24

    DanceEnergy24 New Member

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    So I'm getting ready to purchase my first HDTV soon. I know I want the 1080p picture quality but I'm trying to figure out if the 120hz refresh rate is worth the extra money. I have heard varying opinions saying that it's definitely worth it and definitely not worth it. I've also heard that the 120hz technology was mainly designed for fast motion in gaming and sports and that Blu-ray movies don't look natural or realistic in 120hz. What are your opinions? What have your experiences been with this issue?
     
  2. SaxCatz

    SaxCatz New Member

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    Definitely go for 120hz.
    I don't suggest the use of the motion interpolation features (these are what create that "fake" look- often described as the "soap opera effect"; just turn them off), however, 5:5 (or 4:4- some operate at 96hz for 24p material) pulldown on 120hz displays enables true reproduction of 24p content without judder.
    Also, as a necessity, most 120hz displays have a lower response time than their 60hz counterparts which helps to decrease motion blur even when avoiding motion interpolation.
     
  3. SaviniFan

    SaviniFan I Have A Fetish

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    I own a Hitachi 120hz 1080p LCD. I say save the money and just get a 60hz with a refresh rate of 4 ms or less. I rarely use the 120hz feature and it makes movies look like soap operas. A good site to go to to educate yourself on what HDTV will be a good purchase for your needs is http://www.newegg.com/. Lot's of reliable buyer reviews that are much more detailed than anything you'd see on Walmart's or Amazon's sites. I've actually bought my last 2 HDTVs from there as well. Most times you can get free shipping, and the prices are great.
     
  4. X-human

    X-human I ate my keys

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    I would not spend the extra cash JUST for 120hz, so if to you that is the only difference between the models just go with 60hz. If there are other considerations though, you could also say the 120hz is another reason to go for more.

    The increase in hz is mostly just noticeable for 3D, which as you increase becomes more smooth. But you're not talking 3D here so it's not a game changer.
     
  5. Grim

    Grim Well-Known Member

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    Mine has 120hz, but I keep it turned off. It looks bad and my TV bumps it down to 24hz automatically when I put a blu-ray in anyway. I will say that the ones that offer still usually have a bunch of other advantages over their 60hz counterparts, so even if you don't use it, it may still be worth the investment.
     
  6. rhett

    rhett Administrator

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    Yeah, the motion interpolation features of 120 Hz and above really are terrible and insulting to the art of cinema, but the reason to perhaps consider those TVs over your plain jane 60 Hz TVs is that many 60 Hz TVs are based on older technology, so the engine driving the display is not sophisticated as your newer 240 Hz television. The men above me all speak wise, so I guess the only other thing I'd offer is pay a little more for a brand you trust rather than for a Hz designation. Make sure it's 1080p and not 720p, that's your most important choice, and the rest should be flexible based on your budget and taste.
     
  7. DanceEnergy24

    DanceEnergy24 New Member

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    Is it possible to turn off the motion interpolation feature and still get the benefit of 120hz? If you turn off the motion interpolation does that automatically turn off the 120hz? And if so, what would be the point in getting 120hz to being with if you're just going to turn it off for movies?
     
  8. Kolpitz

    Kolpitz Purely and Simply Evil

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    The wife and I bought a 60hz LCD for the bedroom and, even with all of the filters turned off, things still look a little "Soap Opera-y" to me. Not as bad as I've seen it on display models at Best Buy but noticeable. My 60hz Plasma in the living room still looks great though. Has anyone ever noticed the "Soap Opera" effect on a Plasma TV? I've only noticed them on LCD units.
     
  9. Grim

    Grim Well-Known Member

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    I don't really see how 120hz can help a film anyway. If something was filmed at a frame rate that caused the image to blur while it was recording, you can't really fix that. The source itself is blurry. It's not like there's a clear version of image hidden somewhere that you can display if you mutilate the frame rate.
     
  10. DanceEnergy24

    DanceEnergy24 New Member

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    I've been doing some more research and you all can let me know if I'm correct in what I think I found out. If your set is 120hz there is no way to turn that off. However, you can turn off the motionflow or motion interpolation and still have the benefit of 120hz. This will get rid of both the soap opera effect as well as judder by allowing for true reproduction of 24fps instead or requiring 3:2 pulldown in 60hz TVs. Basically, 120hz will always be 120hz and is not the same as motion interpolation. The 120hz can be used with or without motion interpolation. And without you don't get the soap opera effect or judder.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2011
  11. SaviniFan

    SaviniFan I Have A Fetish

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    I believe you are correct in this assumption. Although the panel will always display at 120hz, I really can't tell any difference going from a 60hz 42" to my 120hz 42" LCD without using the motion flow feature. I'm still in the camp that believes your money would be better spent on a quality 60hz HDTV that has a good contrast ratio and a refresh rate of 4 ms or less.
     
  12. KamuiX

    KamuiX The Eighth Samurai

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    As others have said, if you're mainly getting the TV for Blu-Ray's and HD television shows, you're best in spending the money on the TV that pleases you best picture-wise, not on one just because it's 120hz. There's little difference in the picture without using the motionflow (and the difference when it's on will make you want to poke your eyes out), although it is true what rhett says that the tech inside IS more advanced.

    However, if you watch a lot of sports, 120hz is pretty awesome...my friend has one and we watched a football game on it using the motionflow and it's pretty damn impressive. At home, I'm not lamenting watching football on my paltry 1080p 60hz or anything, but you can definitely see the advantage on the 120hz. I'm only into football though, so I can't really justify spending money on an upgrade for basically something like 40-45 days a year worth of programming that I'd use the feature for.
     
  13. SaxCatz

    SaxCatz New Member

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    Yes. Read my post above. Disable motion interpolation or creative frame interpolation and enable 5:5 pulldown. You will have all of the benefits of the newer technology as well as the benefit of 24p signals being handling without judder (as frames are replicated either 4 or 5 times on a 120hz display where a 60hz display must perform a 3:2 pulldown to display 60hz content.)
     
  14. SaxCatz

    SaxCatz New Member

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    Such a thing is rare. As panels have evolved, 120hz (and 240hz) panels have all but monopolized manufacturers mid- and upper- range sets. If you buy a 60hz panel, you are most likely buying a low end display based on the manufacturers tooling from 2-3 years ago.
    You are correct, however, that the refresh rate is more important, and I believe I alluded to this somewhat in my initial post.
     
  15. SaxCatz

    SaxCatz New Member

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    Plasma displays have typically been aimed at the videophile crowd. While they typically function at 60hz, the fundamental technology behind plasma minimizes the type of motion blur that many LCD panels are subject to (keep in mind that any blurring in the source cannot be eliminated). You will see many plasmas advertised as "480hz" or "600hz", but these advertisement are misleading and refer to the sub-field drive that refreshes the pixels. The video processing will still operate at 60hz with most newer sets handling 24p at either 48hz or 96hz. As such, I am not aware of many examples of plasma displays offering (or at least advertising) CFI, but I don't know that anything technologically prevents them from doing so.
     
  16. Kolpitz

    Kolpitz Purely and Simply Evil

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    I'll just add this to my ever-expanding list of reasons why I love Plasma and hate LCD.
     
  17. KR~!

    KR~! The Apocalyptic Kid

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    Plasma TV look the best to me, but they are getting harder to find and fewer companies make them.

    60hz vs. 120hz?

    60hz looks better for movies
    120hz looks better for sports

    Of course it also depends on the set.
     
  18. indiephantom

    indiephantom Horny Spirit

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    This is what I've found. I'm happy as hell with my 60hz LCD.
     
  19. baggio

    baggio Well-Known Member

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    I know you said your getting a 1080p HDTV. But I will add that a 720p HDTV has zero fast motion problems & movies will always have that true film like appeal.

    If it's 37 inch TV or under, I would go with that. And on side note, any TV broadcast are in 720p. Including HBO, SHO, etc...
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2011
  20. SaviniFan

    SaviniFan I Have A Fetish

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    If you're looking to save a couple of bucks, 720p at the sizes baggio mentioned is probably the way to go. I'm in the camp that thinks you won't really begin to notice the 1080p difference until you go 42" or larger.
     

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