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View Full Version : LD Sleeve help! (picture inside)


Sam
03-05-2003, 12:35 AM
http://pic1.picturetrail.com/VOL114/955847/1766272/21094405.jpg

I've been having a rough time finding GOOD, durable sleeves for Laserdiscs. Normally, you just see those tiny, thin poly sleeves that are advertised as 'heavy duty' when in fact they barely offer any protection at all.

The kind I want is in this pic. They're the thickest and best for the job from what I have noticed. But I have no idea what they're called or how you can find them for sale. The ones I have came with the LDs that I bought used.

Does anyone know where I can find these kinds of sleeves? (with a flap or not.)

P.S- I've also seen (and own) a few Zip Lock Bag Sleeves made especially for Laserdiscs. Anyone know where you can find these? I would GREATLY appreciate any help! :)

Admin
03-05-2003, 01:09 AM
The ones I used to buy are similar. Real thick and high quality. Unfortunately, the company I bought them from - Playback Trading - says they are no longer being made.

I know Bags Unlimited sells bags with flaps. I'm not sure how thick they are, but their prices are real nice. Actually, I'm going to be placing an order with them for this week for the storage bags and the inner paper sleeves. I'll let you know no the quality if you'd like.

Funny too, because I'm always touting that I don't care much if the cover is damanged. And that's true, but at the same time I don't want to go out of my way to damage it. I just like treating my lasers with some respect! Hopefully these Bags Unlimited supplies will work out.

Sam
03-05-2003, 01:32 AM
Great, I'd love to get an opinion from someone that isn't selling them. The last sleeves I bought on eBay were for the cover art, and get this - they're not the right size to fit over the jacket. :eek2:

Paff
03-05-2003, 04:15 AM
I don't like those, even though they do offer good protection. I use the lightweight thin sleeves, which do protect the artwork enough for me. Ross' Exchange sells em 10 for a buck.

I think Big Emma's sells the heavier sleeves. At least they used to. Haven't ordered accessories from them in a while.

Agent Z
03-05-2003, 08:51 AM
I never really liked the real sturdy sleeves....since they usually offer such a tight-fit that you have to struggle and scrape the sides of the LD jacket when you want to take it out. Whatever the sturdiness you choose, be sure to avoid the cheap poly bags (virgin poly if you have to...and be prepared to replace every three years) and go for the Mylar bags, if at all possible. Also, be sure to replace all those awful elephant condoms with paper sleeves for the laserdiscs themselves. This will avoid the dreaded punch-through scenario that tears up laserdisc covers over time......

jscott
03-06-2003, 01:21 AM
Originally posted by MISSIONCODEZ
Whatever the sturdiness you choose, be sure to avoid the cheap poly bags (virgin poly if you have to...and be prepared to replace every three years) and go for the Mylar bags, if at all possible.

Please forgive me for not being a plastics expert, but how on Earth do I determine what my LD sleeves are made of? All I know is they're thin, with a resealable, adhesive flap, and the plastic strip that covers the adhesive has Japanese writing on it. I bought 100 from the local record store for $5 (the store was getting rid of the last of their stock), so I doubt if they have the package that they were shipped in, which probably tells what type of plastic they're made from.

Also, why the need to replace the sleeves every three years?
Any help would be appreciated.

Agent Z
03-07-2003, 09:41 AM
Please forgive me for not being a plastics expert, but how on Earth do I determine what my LD sleeves are made of? All I know is they're thin, with a resealable, adhesive flap, and the plastic strip that covers the adhesive has Japanese writing on it. I bought 100 from the local record store for $5 (the store was getting rid of the last of their stock), so I doubt if they have the package that they were shipped in, which probably tells what type of plastic they're made from.

Jscott, as cheap as you got those bags, they are almost certainly not Mylar-D bags. The next time you purchase your bags, check with the merchant (most are going to list the type of the plastic the item is made from anyway). I found an excellent newsgroup post from Paul Adams. While the post is from sometime ago and centers on comic book storage, the same general rules still apply for whatever collectible you are looking to bag:

"To preserve and Protect" (http://groups.google.com/groups?q=comic+book+storage+types+of+bags&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&safe=off&selm=287edp%24iso%40Tut.MsState.Edu&rnum=2)


An excerpt from the guide:

" For long term storage use only Mylar bags. For intermediate storage, meaning for about two years, polypropylene or polyethylene bags will do.

Comic Bags
__________


There are three main types of plastic used in making comic bags.

Polypropylene
Uncoated and untreated polypropylene is excellent for archival
purposes. Unfortunately the only means of sealing it is to add
polyvinyl dichloride, PVDC, a relative of polyvinyl chloride, PVC.
This is harmful to the comic book in the long run. Additionally
it contains other solvents and additives to assure clarity and to
increase the flexibility of the plastic. These are also damaging
over the long run. Eventually even the bag itself will turn yellow. On the plus side, polypropylene is inexpensive, costing around 5 cents a bag, and will prevent much of the damage discussed above.

Polyethylene
Uncoated and untreated polyethylene is a good moisture barrier, but has a high gas transmission rate. It also shrinks and loses its shape under warm conditions. Additionally it contains other solvents and additives to assure clarity and to increase the flexibility of the plastic. These are also damaging over the long run. Still, it is inexpensive costing around 4 cents a bag.

Mylar
4 mil Mylar ( 1 mil = 1/1000th of an inch ) is the most expensive
type of bag as well as being the best for archiving your comic book. It does not degrade or turn yellow with time except when exposed to UV light. Thus it is inert and is very impermeable to water. Its disadvantages, besides its expense, is that in relation to the other poly- bags, it is stiff. This may damage the comic book if one is not careful. Another disadvantage is that it does not have a sealing flap like the prior two do. Mylar type D is made by DuPont Company and is an uncoated polyester film. An equivalent material is Melinex 316 by ICI Corporation. Either is the preferred material for archiving valuable documents in according to the U.S. Library of Congress.

Mylites
In order to remove the disadvantages of 4 mil Mylar, 1 mil thick Mylites comic bags have been introduced. Since it is thinner, it is not as stiff and is less likely to damage the comic book.
It also has the sealing flap found in the polypropylene and
polyethylene comic bags."

That's just a small portion of the guide and you would do well to read it all.

jscott
03-07-2003, 03:07 PM
Thanks Missioncodez.