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dwatts
04-26-2003, 09:02 PM
Damn! This came in the mail today. I'm looking forward to seeing it tonight - BIG TIME! Don't know if anyone else has this disc, but I've wanted it for ages.

Zodiac-Mindwarp
04-26-2003, 09:48 PM
Thanks to ReverandDave I just got a list of all the Midnite Movies, I did not know that most of these were even out, including Curse Of The Demon/Night Of The Demon.

I think that I will put most of them on my wish list and add one or two to my purchase each time I do a order.

I look forward to hearing how great this double feature is so that I can move it up on my list of purchases.

dwatts
04-26-2003, 10:57 PM
Hey - not watched it yet.. soon soon. But that list sounds cool. How about emailing it to me.

hell ya!
04-26-2003, 10:57 PM
I was thinking about getting this one too and would love to hear your thoughts on it. It sounds very interesting.

Paff
04-26-2003, 11:09 PM
I watched this a while ago for a review, but then got busy and never finished the review. So I need to see it again.

Good movie though...

Zodiac-Mindwarp
04-26-2003, 11:15 PM
Originally posted by dwatts
Hey - not watched it yet.. soon soon. But that list sounds cool. How about emailing it to me.

I sent you a Private Message with the Midnite Movie list.

dwatts
04-26-2003, 11:17 PM
You da man!

Zodiac-Mindwarp
04-26-2003, 11:38 PM
You are very Welcome D. :D

dwatts
04-27-2003, 02:03 AM
Ohhhhhh – Night of the Demon!

There are two versions of this film – Night of the Demon (UK Version) and Curse of the Demon (US Version). The US version loses more than 10 minutes. Both are on this disc.

I just sat and watched Night of the Demon (more is always good, right?)

Well – first thing is first – great film! Honestly, I saw this a long time ago, and was not disappointed this evening when I sat and watched it. It is a film with a lot of great set pieces (The demon, the wind in the Hall grounds with the clown, the trains). It reeks old film charm, with plenty of good old English actors to keep you happy.

I will say this – the US version is likely the better option of the two. The UK version has more padding, and it shows a bit. This is a brilliant 80-minute film, and a very good 90-minute one. It dragged ever so slightly in the longer cut.

If I were too look at this again and ask – should I buy it? Well, one big – HELL OF A YES! No regrets at all. Transfer is very nice (Not reference, but what can we expect) and despite there being no extras except two trailers (one for Fright Night and one for The Bride starring Sting, which looked like it stank) it was easily worth the $20 I paid.

This is another film to add to your classics collection without a doubt. They don’t make them this anymore, they just forgot how.

Fart Lighter
04-27-2003, 11:23 AM
Originally posted by Zodiac-Mindwarp
Thanks to ReverandDave I just got a list of all the Midnite Movies, I did not know that most of these were even out, including Curse Of The Demon/Night Of The Demon.


It's not part of the Midnite Movies line, it's released by Columbia Tristar.

Paff
04-27-2003, 11:06 PM
Originally posted by dwatts
I will say this – the US version is likely the better option of the two. The UK version has more padding, and it shows a bit. This is a brilliant 80-minute film, and a very good 90-minute one. It dragged ever so slightly in the longer cut.

I don't wanna get too in-depth here, since I need to discuss this in my review, but I think the longer cut is better for a couple of reasons. A pivotal scene is moved up too early in the shorter version, and has much less impact. And I like that the longer one shows a little more of the meeting on the plane of the two main characters, it kinda sets up their relationship for the rest of the movie.

Zodiac-Mindwarp
04-28-2003, 02:30 AM
Originally posted by Fart Lighter
It's not part of the Midnite Movies line, it's released by Columbia Tristar.

Opps!

Thanks for pointing that out.

wago70
04-28-2003, 05:21 PM
I have never seen this film before getting the dvd and after watching it, I realize what a dummy I was for ignoring this effective little chiller all those years. There's a sense of dread in this film that I liked since the main character is put in some real danger but soooooooooo not clued in to it. Great film on all counts!

dwatts
04-30-2003, 01:15 AM
I must respectfully disagree here. I saw the shorter cut today, and I really do think it is better. The scene moved up involves the pages of a book, and honestly, it made more dramatic sense earlier in the film - it adds more mystery, more suspense.

Don't get me wrong, this DVD is just great, no matter which version you care to watch. However, as in the case of Deep Red, less can be more, imho.

Ravenheart
04-11-2004, 05:37 PM
I've only seen the Cure of the Demon version of this movie but I liked it.I'm hoping one of these days to pick up the Double Feature DVD with Night of the Demon.

dwatts
04-13-2004, 01:35 PM
What you waiting for? This is a great DVD release, of a classic film. It's not the kind of thing I'd expect to be around forever, not that I have any insight in it going OOP, it just seems as though it was always a little more difficult to get..... Probably just me. Either way, treat yourself soon.

marioscido
04-18-2004, 06:47 AM
I've been away for a while and come back to find out that you've been discussing one of the great horror films from the 50s. I love this film. It should be in every horror fan's collection. Atmospheric, ambiguous (like all Tourneur), and extremely sophisticated. Brilliant film! I like both versions - but I think think the shorter version might actually be more effective...

Tuzotonic
06-17-2004, 01:30 AM
I must see this movie. From what I have heard and read this could possibly be the best horror movie of the 50s. It was in Blockbuster the other day and for some werid reason I didn't rent it. I think I'll go buy it instead. It sounds like a movie I need in my collection.

Lyle Horowitz
06-17-2004, 12:32 PM
One of the films on my "overrated" classic horror list. I've seen the "Curse" cut twice and the "Night" cut once and I haven't really been able to get into it.

rhett
06-17-2004, 01:06 PM
I saw this on a VHS print a couple years ago, I believe it was the longer cut. Great film. I remember thinking that it was one of the few films that was effective as both an ambiguous ghost story and as a classic monster movie. Like in THE HAUNTING many of the scenes work so well because they build on the unknown, what you never see. But when the monster is revealed near the end it also works as a graphic monster movie; there are few films with a better villain than this. I haven't seen many horror films from the 50s, but this one definitely takes the cake.

dwatts
06-17-2004, 05:24 PM
Give this a shot, as a double bill, with "Night of the Eagle". It's quite something. A lot of really great films were made in this time frame.

Lyle: Is there something specific you didn't like, or is it the era of filmaking that doesn't appeal?

The vision of the clown, standing on the lawn of his house as an impromptu storm kicks up, is worth the price of admission, imo.

MaxRenn
06-17-2004, 10:44 PM
I saw this on a VHS print a couple years ago, I believe it was the longer cut. Great film. I remember thinking that it was one of the few films that was effective as both an ambiguous ghost story and as a classic monster movie. Like in THE HAUNTING many of the scenes work so well because they build on the unknown, what you never see. But when the monster is revealed near the end it also works as a graphic monster movie; there are few films with a better villain than this. I haven't seen many horror films from the 50s, but this one definitely takes the cake.

I'm curious as to why you found this an ambiguous movie as the first few minutes confirm the existence of the demon. That is a direct contrast to similar movies like "The Haunting", "The Innocents" and "Night of The Eagle" where the ambiguity exists throughout the movie and, arguably, even after it is over. That creates a different dynamic in the viewer as we know that Dana Andrews is out of his depth and in danger throughout the movie - it is not gradually revealed. It is interesting to think how the film would be different without that first sequence. I seem to remember reading that director Tourneur did not want to show the demon in such detail (if at all).

Tourneur was an expert at creating an atmosphere of unseen menace and deserves to be better known. If the three film he made for Val Lewton in the 40s ever get released on DVD he should start to get more recognition. I think his excellent film noir "Out of the Past" with Robert Mitchum is getting released sometime soon.

Tuzotonic
06-17-2004, 11:42 PM
I know I should have probably read this thread more closely but what is the difference between Curse of the Demon and Night of the Demon? I've always assumed "Curse" was the only version of the film.

Lyle Horowitz
06-18-2004, 12:18 AM
Give this a shot, as a double bill, with "Night of the Eagle". It's quite something. A lot of really great films were made in this time frame.

Lyle: Is there something specific you didn't like, or is it the era of filmaking that doesn't appeal?

The vision of the clown, standing on the lawn of his house as an impromptu storm kicks up, is worth the price of admission, imo.
Oh, I LOVE classic horror. That's my main forte. I also really like The Haunting, which Rhett mentioned. This just didn't grab me. The demon looked goofy, the film was TOO slow, and I just couldn't get into the film. My favorite scene is the seance, though. Very creepy. The ending is pretty good as well. I love train settings, especially in horror/suspense films. It's moving, so you can't really escape, very small, claustrophobic, and is utilized perfectly in this film as well as Dr. Terror's House of Horrors, Martin (Although I believe it was a BUS in the begining, but I'm not sure), The Lady Vanishes, Strangers on a Train, among others.

Lyle Horowitz
06-18-2004, 12:19 AM
I know I should have probably read this thread more closely but what is the difference between Curse of the Demon and Night of the Demon? I've always assumed "Curse" was the only version of the film.
I believe Curse is the longer British cut. After watching both cuts, I really didn't notice a difference, honestly. Same with Carnival of Souls.

dwatts
06-18-2004, 12:31 AM
Well, the britsh version is longer, and the US vrsion also shuffles some of the scenes. It's an interesting thing to see, since they move scenes by quite a few minutes, and I like BOTH versions. I'd always have guessed doing so would ruin films - but this proves it doesn't.

marioscido
06-18-2004, 08:27 AM
I think "Night of the Demon" is among the best horror films of the 1950s and one of the best of the horror genre. I take back what I said earlier: I agree with dwatts that both versions are equally as good. They both deserve to be screened and analyzed. However, I think the shorter version may have better pacing – but I’m not sold on this, since I haven’t watched "Curse" in a while.

MaxRenn is absolutely right about Tourneur not wanting the opening scene to play out the way it does. It appears like Hal E. Chester, the producer, annoyed lots of folks on this production, including the great writer Charles Bennett. Apparently, Chester, re-wrote the script without Bennett’s approval (the film is credited to both of them). BTW, name a great pre-WWII Hitchcock film and you’ll find Bennett attached to the project. He adapted "The 39 Steps" (1935) and wrote "Sabotage" (1936), and "Secret Agent" (1936)… and many more.

Tourneur said this to a French magazine about the opening scene: "The scenes in which you really see the demon were shot without me. All except one. I shot the sequence in the woods where Dana Andrews is chased by this sort of cloud. This technique should have been used for the other sequences…"

Understandably, most film critics have condemned the demon in the film. However, more recently, critics have approached the film with a little more complexity. I think the demon belongs wholeheartedly to the film and I also think the film is much better because of it. In a way, the imposition of the demon from outside of Tourneur’s own structure has rendered his play with perspective much more complex. I wonder if he was aware of this while the film was being edited – maybe not. However, notwithstanding the intentions of an artist, this film succeeds in going places it probably would never have gone if the demon had not invaded the diegetic structure of the film (that is, the created world of the film).

"Night of the Demon" is one of the most fascinating horror films to come along in the 1950s, precisely because the presence of the demon puts the attentive viewer in the uncomfortable position of a) thinking that s/he knows that the demon exists in spite of Holden’s (Dana Andrews) skepticism, but also b) thinking that s/he knows the demon exists even though Tourneur is forever throwing scenes at the viewer that make him/her hesitate about the reality of the creature. Because of this split structure, the viewer, like Andrews, is also in a constant state of hesitation (even though the demon appears on the screen and seems to confirm its own reality).

The film needs to be seen repeatedly to really begin to notice what Tourneur is doing with diegetic perspective and viewer perspective. I want to direct you to the scene where Holden breaks into Karswell’s house at night and slowly makes his way down the stairs. Watch that scene again and you may notice something strange with how viewer/character perspectives are being drawn out – split, if you like. What Tourneur is after here is not the kind of ambiguity found in Robert Wise’s "The Haunting," were viewer and characters experience hesitation and uncertainty – diegetically. Tourneur is after an in-between space where the diegetic reality and another reality intersect. This promotes discomfort. Many people have complained that this film is awkward and slow, but part it this discomfort comes form Tourneur’s play with perspective.

The film becomes much more ambiguous when you begin to see the splitting of perspectives in the film. And I think the film is far more brilliantly conceived than Wise’s film, which works only on one level. What can I say: I love this film!

Tuzotonic
06-18-2004, 07:37 PM
One of the things I really like about what I've heard about this movie is that is seems to be a straight up horror movie and not a movie about a monster who was created as the result of a nuclear bomb or war as were so many movies of the 50s. This seems to be an old fashioned scare the shit out of you horror story.

zbinks
12-07-2013, 08:10 AM
DVDBeaver review of the French Wild Side Blu-Ray: http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film2/dvdreviews31/night_of_the_demon.htm