PDA

View Full Version : Euro Horror influence on American Horror Films


Jason25
11-27-2000, 04:25 AM
I was curious to know if anyone on here has any opinions on this. I definitely feel that some american directors have been strongly influenced by Euro horror films and their directors. Fulci, Argento, Soavi, Martino, Lenzi, Bava, the list goes on. I think these directors have had a profound impact on american horror directors.

One example that comes to mind is William Lustig. He himself admits that Maniac is his homage to Fulci/Argento films.

Any other examples ? I'm curious to hear other opinions on this.

maniacjack
11-27-2000, 04:48 AM
The prime and only example to this subject is Bava's Bay of Blood, which of course started it all. The first two Friday films ripped this one off very badly. Tarantino's Resevoir Dogs can be traced back to Bava's Rabid Dogs.

I think the reason Italian horror is treated so badly by critics is because when they come to America, there is a lot to laugh or make fun of. Bay of Blood was originally released in American as Last House on the Left 2. Critics bashed the original and they probably wouldn't even watch Bay thinking it was a cheap ripoff of Last House. Fulci's Zombie won't even be looked at because of it's connection to Dawn of the Dead.

I do think Bava and Argento had an effect on American director's ranging from Craven to Carpenter. Fulci, on the other hand didn't have much. Maybe his "gore" had an effect but he wasn't too good at deliverying anything but gore. I love Fulci and his films but he's no where near Argento or Bava.

Mark Relford
11-28-2000, 02:42 AM
Good topic, Jason25. I agree. Tim Burton's movies are a good example of that influence. The look and feel of Batman, Edward Scissorhands, and especially, Sleepy Hollow ooze European. (Dig that homage to Black Sunday in SH!)
Kubrick's The Shining also comes to mind.

------------------
"Have you ever had an Egyptian feast?"

sirago17
12-05-2000, 12:03 AM
Originally posted by maniacjack:
Tarantino's Resevoir Dogs can be traced back to Bava's Rabid Dogs.


I must differ on this. I don't think anyone had ever seen Rabid Dogs until a couple years ago, because it was never finished. Reservoir Dogs is quoting/ripping off/paying homage to (whichever you prefer) Ringo Lam's City On Fire.
Having said that, Rabid Dogs was a fine movie.

mutleyhyde
12-05-2000, 03:12 AM
I really don't personally like Tarantino all that much, but he has from the very beginning acknowledged Ringo Lam's influence and has always been up front about the seeds of Dogs; so I definitely believe the case is more paying homage than anything. Dogs is great, Pulp Fiction is great, but he's dissed on my man Roger Avary, and that ain't too cool. Plus, what has he done for us lately? Yeah, Switchblade Sisters was great camp fun, and Mighty Peking Man kicked ass, but when is he gonna give us something new of his own. What, has he run out of ideas? Was he just a flash in the pan (although a mighty fine flash it was)? Sorry for the rant. I just felt compelled to defend Quentin; and then bash him!

------------------
"When I go to confession, I don't offer God small sins - petty squables, jealousies - I offer him sins worth forgiving!"

May the Hammer eternally bleed!
M. Hyde

Wooly
12-12-2000, 12:38 AM
I believe he is working on the script for an adaptation of Elmore Leonard's story 40 Lashes Less One, which he will also direct I hear, but under the name Forty Lashes. I read the synopsis of the book and it sounds pretty damn solid, very Tarantino-like stuff

mutleyhyde
12-12-2000, 03:38 AM
Somebody light a fire under this underachievers butt!! I wish my man Avery would get crackin' too though. What a couple'a slackers!

------------------
"When I go to confession, I don't offer God small sins - petty squables, jealousies - I offer him sins worth forgiving!"

May the Hammer eternally bleed!
M. Hyde

childof80s
12-19-2000, 04:31 PM
On his audio commentary on the laserdisc of HALLOWEEN (terrible that it didn't make it to the DVD), John Carpenter and Debra Hill site DEEP RED and SUSPIRIA as greatly influencing HALLOWEEN, particularly the score.