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View Full Version : Silent era recomendations.


Jimbo
08-24-2003, 10:13 PM
Ok,I have Nosferatu and The Cabinet of DR Calgari and am interested in getting some more silent movies.Unfortunetally i have not seen any other ones but these two.Can anyone give me a heads up on recomendations.How's Faust? Or The Golem?Any help would be nice!!

dwatts
08-24-2003, 10:23 PM
Golem obviously!

Metropolis is awesome too.

Then just go look for some Lon Chaney. Phantom of the Opera for instance, amazing! He also did Hunchback of Notre Dame, but not sure if that one is out yet.

mcchrist
08-24-2003, 10:45 PM
Faust is definitley a must, also look for Fall of the House of Usher. The Bells is another one you might want to keep an eye out for.

RyanPC
08-24-2003, 11:05 PM
Originally posted by dwatts
Golem obviously!

Metropolis is awesome too.

Then just go look for some Lon Chaney. Phantom of the Opera for instance, amazing! He also did Hunchback of Notre Dame, but not sure if that one is out yet.

I don't know if Hunchback is out on DVD yet either but definitely check it out-- great movie. So is The Phantom of the Opera, but unfortunately, I wouldn't buy the DVDs as I can't see myself watching a silent film all too often. Just isn't my thing. But once in a great while it's nice to see one. I still need to check out the original Nosferatu... I loved the Kinski remake!

Jimbo
08-24-2003, 11:24 PM
Well i have Images phantom 2 disk on pre order and the hunchback by image is oop.So i guess i will have to wait on that one to surface again.Has anyone seen LES VAMPIRES?

mcchrist
08-24-2003, 11:30 PM
Les Vampires is a crime drama, there's some interesting imagery in it (basically it's the whole costumed villain thing going on), sort of a secret society of master-criminals. It's not horror if that's what you're asking.

marioscido
08-25-2003, 05:58 PM
If you're looking for transfers that will blow you away: Criterion's "Haxan" and Kino's "Metropolis."

dvdasia62
08-25-2003, 06:43 PM
The German film "Waxworks" with Conrad Veidt is downright bizarre and might be interesting to you. Also, Veidt's "The Man Who Laughs" is being released soon by Kino I believe. On the non-horror side you might want to check out "Battleship:Potemkin" with the unforgettable "Odessa Steps" sequence as well as Carl Dreyers stunning "The Passion Of Joan Of Arc".

studio1
08-25-2003, 07:30 PM
I would recommend all the aforementioned plus these little gems.

Dr Jeckyll

Vampyr

The Monster

S1

Jimbo
08-25-2003, 08:14 PM
Thanks all,I will be checking these out soon!!

mutleyhyde
08-26-2003, 05:40 AM
Originally posted by marioscido
If you're looking for transfers that will blow you away: Criterion's "Haxan" and Kino's "Metropolis."

I'll second those, big time.

Also, I would suggest 'Dr. Mabuse, Der Spieler' http://www.horrordvds.com/vbulletin/images/icons/icon14.gif It's a crime epic from Fritz Lang. The aforementioned Les Vampires is fun, but Dr. Mabuse kicks ass.

I had no idea Chaney's 'Hunchback' was out of print. If it is, then that's a major drag. I actually like Hunchback better then 'Phantom'.

As for Phantom, definitely check it out, but if you're purchasing, hold out for the two disc special edition, I believe out later this year? There's a thread here on it, my brain is fuzzy and I gotta go to sleep, or else I'd check it for you.

Silent films kick ass. Always nice to see someone else getting into them. :)

Paff
08-28-2003, 04:23 AM
two words: Buster Keaton

Jeffrey Dahmer
09-05-2003, 10:01 PM
NO

two words : Charlie Chaplin

Egg_Shen
09-06-2003, 12:13 AM
I suppose I'll chime in with Harold Lloyd. He always seems to be the third man, though I enjoy his work a great deal.

mutleyhyde
09-06-2003, 07:26 AM
I thinnnk Jimbo was looking for silent horror reccomendations (based on the examples he gave), however, I wouldn't disuage anybody from taking up any of the past three suggestions. http://www.horrordvds.com/vbulletin/images/icons/icon14.gif

Paff
09-06-2003, 10:13 AM
Originally posted by Egg_Shen
I suppose I'll chime in with Harold Lloyd. He always seems to be the third man, though I enjoy his work a great deal.

No, nothing at all wrong with Harold Lloyd. The Freshman kicks ass.

Silent-era comedians are so friggin great, 'cause they have to be 100% visual (i.e., Jerry Seinfeld could never be a silent comedian).
I just love Buster Keaton's facial expressions though, or to be more accurate, the total lack of facial expression. The crazier things get, the more relaxed he becomes, which only makes everything funnier.

Egg_Shen
09-06-2003, 12:35 PM
Iíve only seen The General and a few of Keatonís shorts. Heís great in them, but Lloyd is still my favorite. Anyone interested in silent films should check out Turner Classic Movies. On a certain night ( I canít remember which) they play a series of such movies. Itís usually pretty late though.

Shock Waves
03-25-2008, 03:44 AM
Here are a few that I have have watched

-Maciste all'inferno AKA: Maciste in Hell (1925) wild Hercules in hell motif

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t206/poppapolar/453777388_7759a033f3.jpg

-Haxan AKA Witchcraft through the Ages (1922) Wow..if you watch one, watch this one!

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t206/poppapolar/haxan3.jpg

-Faust (1926) selling the soul to ol' Scratch

-The Student of Prauge (I prefer the '26 version to the '13)

-The Unknown (1927) A great story. Chaney is wonderful in this.

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t206/poppapolar/27unknownx.jpg

-Der Golem (1920) wonderful stuff!

-Vampyr (1932) although not totally silent, it could have been..creepy and dream-like

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t206/poppapolar/3042388124.jpg

-The Cat and The Canary (1927) Dark house mystery that is comedic and spooky at the same time.

-The Passion and Death of Joan of Arc (1928) by the director of Vampyr, Carl Theodor Dreyer- not quite horror, but incredible photography

-Metropolis (1927) great automated futuristic stuff

-The Man who Laughs (1928) Creeepy

-Waxworks (1924) The basis for Mystery in the Wax Museum which led, of course, to House of Wax.

-The Lodger (1926) Old school Hitchcock based on Jack the ripper legend

-The Lost World (1925) for the time, brilliant stop motion.

-The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) kinda slow, but the sets and make-up are incredible!


http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t206/poppapolar/Lake_of_Ice.jpg

Erick H.
03-25-2008, 06:24 AM
Not sure it's on DVD ,but I saw a silent called THE MAN FROM BEYOND that starred the famed escape artist Harry Houdini (who made several films), It's kind of a fantasy piece ,a man from the past revived in the present (well,the 20's),fun.
Again,more of a fantasy,but you should see the landmark THE LOST WORLD.

X-human
03-25-2008, 07:35 AM
Maciste in Hell sounds really interesting, looks like it's hard to come by though.

Shock Waves
03-25-2008, 08:59 AM
Maciste in Hell sounds really interesting, looks like it's hard to come by though.

I got it on Nightmare Worlds which is one of those 50 movie packs for 20 bucks from Mill Creek. Not a great print, but the set was interesting.

dwatts
03-25-2008, 06:48 PM
Here are a few that I have have watched

-Maciste all'inferno AKA: Maciste in Hell (1925) wild Hercules in hell motif

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t206/poppapolar/453777388_7759a033f3.jpg

-Haxan AKA Witchcraft through the Ages (1922) Wow..if you watch one, watch this one!

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t206/poppapolar/haxan3.jpg

-Faust (1926) selling the soul to ol' Scratch

-The Student of Prauge (I prefer the '26 version to the '13)

-The Unknown (1927) A great story. Chaney is wonderful in this.

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t206/poppapolar/27unknownx.jpg

-Der Golem (1920) wonderful stuff!

-Vampyr (1932) although not totally silent, it could have been..creepy and dream-like

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t206/poppapolar/3042388124.jpg

-The Cat and The Canary (1927) Dark house mystery that is comedic and spooky at the same time.

-The Passion and Death of Joan of Arc (1928) by the director of Vampyr, Carl Theodor Dreyer- not quite horror, but incredible photography

-Metropolis (1927) great automated futuristic stuff

-The Man who Laughs (1928) Creeepy

-Waxworks (1924) The basis for Mystery in the Wax Museum which led, of course, to House of Wax.

-The Lodger (1926) Old school Hitchcock based on Jack the ripper legend

-The Lost World (1925) for the time, brilliant stop motion.

-The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) kinda slow, but the sets and make-up are incredible!


http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t206/poppapolar/Lake_of_Ice.jpg

Isn't that lst shot from L'inferno? Yet you don't seem to have listed it....

Shock Waves
03-25-2008, 11:57 PM
Isn't that lst shot from L'inferno? Yet you don't seem to have listed it....

Yep, you are correct, I didn't put a footnote with it. Good catch!