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View Full Version : What does "SUSPIRIA" mean?


indiephantom
10-24-2003, 09:13 AM
I read that TENEBRAE means "darkness" in Italian and I'm thinking that SUSPIRIA might have some meaning. I've always thought it was a great title, but would love to know more...any info would be awesome.

bwana the clown
10-24-2003, 09:32 AM
It pertains to sighs, deep breaths, etc

Mater Suspiriorum (sp?) - The mother of sighs.

indiephantom
10-24-2003, 09:37 AM
It pertains to sighs, deep breaths, etc

Mater Suspiriorum (sp?) - The mother of sighs.

thanks! Had no idea. :banana:

bwana the clown
10-24-2003, 09:49 AM
It is a great title - always loved it. During my brief attempt to start a film making career I spent ages searching thru Latin dictionaries to find something equally cool sounding - but with no luck.

Cydeous
10-24-2003, 05:41 PM
It's true that Suspiria pertains to sighing. In Italian, the verb to sigh is sospirare. The -are ending changes depending on the pronoun (I sigh = sospiro). However, I'm sure that the Latin word is even closser (since the first 'o' would be a 'u' in Latin).

Tenebre is Italian but Tenebrae is the original Latin, which is also in English. Here is a definition that I got from a dictionary:

any of various liturgical services in the
Western Church during Holy Week, in
which all candles are gradually
extinguished, to commemorate the
darkness at the Crucifixion.

m1cha3l
10-24-2003, 07:41 PM
...always wanted to know what that title means......great name for a movie, anyway....

suspiria ranks up as one of my favourite horror movies of all time. the direction of dario argento and the lightning of the scenes...wow....when i first saw it in DTS my jaw literally dropped throughout the whole movie. the composition and all, along with the great goblin music is pure movie magic....

for all of you who havent seen it yet, get the great anchor bay dvd and youŽll be in for a treat!


ps: this is one of the movies i dream about seeing in my future HT on a big screen....wow...

gloomy grrl
10-24-2003, 08:01 PM
It's been widely speculated that he was influenced by Thomas De Quincey's short story "Levana and Our Ladies of Sorrow" - check out these sites:
http://www.kinoeye.org/02/11/castricano11.php
and
http://www.underthesun.cc/Classics/DeQuincey/LevanaAndOurLadiesOfSorrow/

Cydeous
10-25-2003, 09:54 AM
Thanks for posting the sites, gloomy grrl. I've read "Suspiria, de Profundis". which contains "Levana and Our Ladies of Sorrow" and it's quite cool. In it he names the Three Mothers and where he met them. It's very cool stuff. I can also recommend "Confessions of an English Opium Eater".

The Luigi Cozzi film "The Black Cat" is about Levana. Too bad it's a rather weak film. I hope that Dario Argento actually does finish his trilogy... that would be so awesome.

dmeister
10-25-2003, 10:43 PM
It's been a while since my Latin course, but if "Sospirare" means "to sigh" in Italian ("ere" is the infinitive form in Latin, as well), "Suspiria" would probably be a simple noun in Latin (like a "sigh" if it is feminine or "sighs" if it is neuter), instead of a verb or infinitive.

By the way, gloomy grrl, love your avatar.

dmeister

Andrew
10-27-2003, 12:59 PM
To clarify, since it's suspiriorum in the Genitive plural, it can't be Feminine so it must be Neuter. So Suspiria means "sighs" in the Neuter Nominative plural.

speanroc
10-27-2003, 01:07 PM
:banana: what did you guys go to suspiria college? :D

very impressive

dmeister
10-27-2003, 04:41 PM
So Suspiria means "sighs" in the Neuter Nominative plural.

I feel like we should be having this conversation in a couple of leather lounge chairs, next to a big book case, while we sip cognac and joke idly about the misinterpretations of Einstein's special theory of relativity.

dmeister

Andrew
10-27-2003, 08:27 PM
Haha, it's a possibility.

DeathDealer
10-28-2003, 03:46 AM
Suspiria = Terror.

vampyr789
01-28-2009, 08:01 AM
It's been a while since my Latin course, but if "Sospirare" means "to sigh" in Italian ("ere" is the infinitive form in Latin, as well), "Suspiria" would probably be a simple noun in Latin (like a "sigh" if it is feminine or "sighs" if it is neuter), instead of a verb or infinitive.

cool! ive always wanted to know what it meant!! :)

scott71670
01-28-2009, 01:22 PM
Penguin Classics did a really great definitive edition of deQuincey's Confessions of an Opium Eater and I highly recommend it. Especially fun when you consider not only the idea for Suspiria came from his story but also Confessions of an Opium Eater with Vincent Price is based from a story of his also.

The Chaostar
01-28-2009, 02:59 PM
The book of Thomas De Quincey where these stories are from is called "Confessions of an opium eater". It is full of short stories that the great De Quincey wrote under the influence. Argento has revealed that he was partly influenced by them.
You should check out Maitland McDonaugh's unsurpassed book on Argento "Broken Mirrors, Broken Minds". There you can find a lot on the subject.

P.S. Ooops - just saw that scott has already mentioned the book!