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View Full Version : Just got the newly remastered Nosferatu (1922)


jae
01-17-2001, 07:29 PM
Finally got it and popped it in over lunch.. I don't remember the original version all that well (I rented it about a year ago or so) but do remember that the video quality was pretty bad and it hurt my appreciation of it.. The new version is decent but seems to be missing quite a few frames at time as the picture jumps around alot. Most of the speckles and scratches are on the outside edges of the picture. I wasn't completely thrilled with it but its not bad. Certainly better than the earlier version.

The new soundtrack by Silent Orchestra though is FANTASTIC! I only got to hear bits and pieces of it but the music that accompanies Shreck's scenes is really good and creepy.

There has been talk of yet ANOTHER version of Nosferatu coming out.. I don't know who is releasing it but the video is being redone by someone other than the people who did this new version.. I'm looking forward to hearing how that version compares with this one..

BigDeg187
01-17-2001, 11:03 PM
Black Star. Co.UK have a neat 2 Disc Collectors edition PAL version of the movie, I plan on purchasing that ass soon as I get my new Multi Region PAL/NTSC converter dvd player. What is it like having the tints? Does it take away from the movie? The movie didn't originnaly have tints you know.

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Wanna see something really scary? Vistit http://www.SavageCinema.com

jae
01-17-2001, 11:14 PM
The original Image release didn't have tints? I don't remember.. I don't think it takes away from it at all.. I haven't watched it yet though either.

If you get that R2 set please post a review of it as I'd like to hear how good it is.

mutleyhyde
01-18-2001, 01:36 AM
Okay, let's see if we can get this straight one more time. Yes, the original print was in black and white. This is true, as that was the film that was available at the time. However, when the film was prepared for public presentation, it was tinted to represent various aspects of the story, i.e. night shots, indoor shots, etc. In other words, when the film premiered to the public, it was tinted. This is not some new Ted Turner driven gimmick, a la colorization. Do your homework and you'll see.

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"When I go to confession, I don't offer God small sins - petty squables, jealousies - I offer him sins worth forgiving!"

May the Hammer eternally bleed!
M. Hyde

BigDeg187
01-18-2001, 03:40 AM
If it was tinted for the public why is it being sold in both black and white and tinted formats?? When you mean presented to the public what exactly do you mean? Do you mean by at the theatre. I saw an afternoon presentation of the original Nosferatu at an art theatre a few years ago, the print they showed wasn't titnted, but it was cool because they had a live classical band!

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Wanna see something really scary? Vistit http://www.SavageCinema.com

Paff
01-18-2001, 04:44 AM
Yes, many silent films were tinted to show the different times of day.

But it's almost anyone's guess as to how Nosferatu was "originally shown" since the estate of Bram Stoker successfully lobbied to have all existing prints of the movie DESTROYED due to "plagiarism".

This movie has been cut and pasted so many times (different language title cards, etc) it's amazing we have any complete copies at all. Some re-prints did omit the tinting. I'm not a film historian, so I won't suggest what the "right" version is.

Any film school professors have any concrete info?

mutleyhyde
01-18-2001, 05:08 AM
BigDeg:
Yes, I'm talking about in theatres. Back in 1920 when it came out; not at some repretoiry screening anytime in the past 70+ years. Why are there b&w versions? Same reason why we have b&w reprints of comics that were originally printed in color; some people believe that the integrity of certain media is hampered by the production process. Colored comics tend to distract from the detail of an illustrator's original pencils and inks. That's why b&w comics flourished in the 80's and still survive today. It became chic to have colorless comics. Same thing with films of the silent era. Back then, sepia tinting was common practice for entertaining the mass public. There are two possibilities that come to mind as to why silent era films have been released in their b&w form. At some point down the line, film purists decided that the pre-released product in it's b&w form was the best representation of the filmmaker's intent, removing the "distraction" of tinting. These purist's were afraid that the tinting would dull the impact of the filmmaker's attention to detail such as contrast between light and dark. It's a valid point, but I personally believe that the tinting adds a certain charm to the films. If the tinting process is done with a light enough hand, I believe that contrast is still discernable. The other possibility is that it's just cheaper to produce b&w media as opposed to color, even if it is one color at a time.

And this is not to say that all silent films got this treatment. This only came into fasion after years of straight b&w presentations. It was just the natural, gradual escalation of the media to a higher level. With the popularity of sepia treatments, filmmakers were eventually forced to experiment in color photography and, eureka!, color movies were born.

As to which is the better format for modern day home viewing or repretoiry screening of sepia treated silent film, it's up to the individual. I personally can't make up my mind. I like the tints, but if it's a movie with lot's of dark scenes, Nosferatu included, I'd at least like the opportunity to see the b&w print.

Paff:
(You got your post in before mine.) I'm not professing to be an expert, and I don't personally know exactly how Nosferatu was presented. I must backtrack and admit that I was generalizing about films of the era. It would be risky to assume this of Nosferatu, as I don't know just how much exposure (theatrical screenings) the film recieved before being stamped almost out of existence. I too welcome hard evidence on both issues; the original presentation of Nosferatu and the circulation and audience exposure before the film's untimely demise.

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"When I go to confession, I don't offer God small sins - petty squables, jealousies - I offer him sins worth forgiving!"

May the Hammer eternally bleed!
M. Hyde

[This message has been edited by mutleyhyde (edited 01-18-2001).]