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rhett
06-09-2007, 07:26 AM
Everyone has at least one in their collection. A campy movie that takes itself so seriously you can't help but eat it up. In a little change of pace for HORRORDVDS.COM, all you have to do for this contest is tell us about it.

What is your favorite camp classic?

That's it. Respond to this thread, tell us your favorite, say a few words about it, and you'll be instantly entered into our contest. This is open to everyone, young, old, black, white, communist, Franco, whatever your denomination. Let's see how many posts we can get here, and hopefully we'll all get turned on to some B-movies we've never even heard before.

So what are we playing for?

1st Place Prize:
Cult Camp Classics, Volume 3 box set
The Hitcher t-shirt

2nd Place Prize:
Cult Camp Classics, Volume 3 box set

3rd Place Prize:
The Hitcher t-shirt

The cut-off will be Friday, June 15th at midnight. All the entires will be put into a database, and three members will be randomly drawn.

So let's get to the topic...what's your favorite camp classic?

Noto
06-09-2007, 09:32 AM
never before read... A horrorvds.com exclusive. My ode to...

http://img152.imageshack.us/img152/6719/xcherry200022wa0.jpghttp://img243.imageshack.us/img243/5818/cherrytwothousandpo4.jpg
by Shawn McLoughlin (aka Noto)

Many films throughout time have advertised themselves to “have something for everyone.” Typically they advertise that they have action, adventure, romance, comedy, etc. Usually they either fail at one or more of these genres, or they lose sight of their overall objective. Steve De Jarnatt’s Cherry 2000 is interesting in that it did not openly market itself that way, even though that is exactly what it is, and succeeds very well at.

The overloaded plot could have easily been played for more laughs than it actually was. When the central plot for the first quarter of the film is our hero’s quest to find a replacement for his sexdroid, you might expect the script to deteriorate to become lowbrow smut and contain crude sex jokes typical of numerous 80’s comedies. Thankfully, for the sake of the film, it never sinks that low. Instead, we realize that our hero is not simply looking for a vessel of sexual perversion; he is looking for love. His genuine love for Cherry, and the lengths that he goes to find her, is commendable, romantic and inspiring. By devoting himself to Cherry, he is not devoting himself to a robot, but instead to love itself and therefore secures the importance of the emotion. In a semi-post-apocalyptic future world where romance is insignificant, and casual sex requires a contract and legal representation, finding love anywhere would be a chore, or nearly impossible; even if everyone seems promiscuous by wearing what could be the most extreme selections from Jean-Paul Gauthier’s 20XX fall-season line. Sam (David Andrews) first finds it in his Cherry 2000, the fact that she is a robot isn’t the point; the point is that he found romance, and more importantly, that he was looking for it.

All of that is shown within the first 15 minutes of the film, which includes a James Bond inspired title sequence that runs for part of that. Few films have said so much in such a short period of time, especially from a B-level movie such as this.

At the point where E. Johnson (Melanie Griffith) enters the film, another element of sexism comes into play. Her role as a “tracker” (which seems to be part bounty hunter and part adventurer), is a dangerous job, and as expected, Griffith’s character has been hardened. She has become more masculine, and represses the femininity that she retains. This type of character has been done in countless other films, as has the dynamic played between the two leads here. But while their relationship is destined to reach the standard predictable end, getting there is made more interesting by having the object of the quest being a robotic female substitute. By using this as the device, instead of say, a trinket of some sort (see an Indiana Jones film) or an object needed to save the world/humanity (see The Fifth Element) the film is able to bounce around themes in record time and still come off sincere. Among the clichés is the forced interest in each other from being on the lonely road, the overly romantic male placed next to a hardened woman, a traditional love-triangle in its formation, and the fear that with an accomplished mission comes a permanent separation. Again, there are thousands of films that deal with one or two of these themes, but most can’t pull even that off. Cherry 2000 manages to pull off all of them, and cleverly disguise itself as a sci-fi/western b-movie that doubles as a Mad Max parody. Even with parody, it succeeds in actually becoming superior to Mad Max by not ever taking itself either too seriously or too far over the top to completely lose its audience.

Like everything else in the film, the direction, while nothing overly spectacular, is better than most of its peers. Particular scenes, such as the Mustang hanging from a magnet attached to a giant crane, were done completely based in reality. No blue screens, or CGI, just stunt doubles and lots of things blowing up. This makes for a much more dramatic imagery when you add great wide shots of the Nevada landscape. This is how action films are supposed to be made. No fake sweat being splashed on the actors, or putting a fake backdrop behind them; it’s just an honest camera filming awesome stunts. There are only a handful of inventive, or even good, action movies, and for it to be good it needs to put you in the action and still retain humanity. This is why films like RoboCop, The Terminator, and Die Hard succeed and their copycats and sequels do not. With De Jarnatt’s gift for filming action scenes, it is surprising (and saddening) that he only directed one other complete film, Miracle Mile, which is also an exceptional.

The score is excellent, but hardly original. Basil Poledouris, who scored Paul Verhoven’s RoboCop the same year, arranged it. The two scores, while they do go in different directions, share very similar themes. I am sure that both films being released by Orion Pictures had something to do with his involvement. But if you compare the final moments of RoboCop when the credits start to roll, and the dangling car battle in Cherry 2000, it is impossible not to notice the similarities. Basil was one of the great composers of modern cinema, that is destined to remain forever unknown to the general public, hidden by the John Williams of the world, but whom always seemed to find work, and be consistent in quality.

If there is any fault in this film, it is in its second half when Lester (Tim Thomerson, Dollman) is introduced. We know he is the villain because we are told, but with the exception of a few moments he just seems too docile to lead a group of would-be outcasts. It works well for the parody aspect that he has cookouts with his group and they all do the hokey-pokey, but it makes him become a much less effective villain. He has no real purpose for wanting to kill our heroes aside from that they are there, and relatively close in proximity. Still, it is not like this is distracting because our heroes do need to be in peril, and Lester’s evil silliness is necessary to both move the plot along and make the characters more dependant on each other.

There is more than enough good here to outweigh the film’s minor faults. It may sound like I am reasonably biased, and to a point, I am. This is my favourite movie of all time, even if is far from the greatest. First seeing this film as an eight-year-old in February 1989, I have seen it at least sixty times since. About fifteen of those viewings were since the day the DVD came out which, before it was announced, I emailed MGM nearly every day asking for a release date. Reading the email reply with the press release I was nearly in tears. To this obsession, there really is no excuse because no film is worth that much attention, and even more so not deserving of such a reaction. But everyone has “their” movie. Cherry 2000 is mine, and even if no one else in the world can see the wonder that I do, I offer up no excuses to them.

ekent
06-09-2007, 02:29 PM
http://www.critcononline.com/images/summer%20camp%20nightmare%20embassy%20vhs%20ad.jpg

Summer Camp Nightmare

Destined to line the shelves of many a horror section, Summer Camp Nightmare dissapointed many video store patrons who were looking for their horror fix. This film is actually a thriller-drama that is in the same vein as Lord of the Flies. If you can get past the fact that you have been duped into renting a non-horror title, then you'll be in for a treat.

The story starts innocently enough, a few busloads of kids on their way to Camp North Pines. The normal games and activities fill the day for the young campers, and everything is running smoothly, until the night of the talent show, which the girls from Camp South Pines were invited to participate. After a few sexually charged themes are performed on the stage (one of them being Fear's "Beef Baloney"), camp director Mr. Warren (played by Chuck Connners) decides to shut it down, and cancel the dance, much to the dismay of all the horny teenagers.

This pushes camp counselor Franklin Riley over the edge. Franklin is an ideolistic young man, well versed in political theory and rheotoric. He uses suspect means to convince the other campers to join him in overthrowing the camp and locking the counselors up in the "meditation room". The revolution goes as planned, and everyone is having fun, but the chain of command begins to crumble. Few revolutions prove to be bloodless, and this is no exception.

I must have seen this film on HBO a few dozen times in the late 80's. Unfortunately, no DVD is out at this time so I settle for my laserdisc and VHS copies. With a DVD shelf lined with multi-million dollar budgeted films, this little gem has somehow crept its way into my top 5.

rhett
06-09-2007, 05:21 PM
And here I was just looking for a couple lines on your favorite flick. Great stuff guys, keep it coming!

KR~!
06-09-2007, 06:06 PM
jesus, people here are writing their master thesis...

anyway,...

me likey Gamera vs Guillon cause:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2e6eRzoP-c

Workshed
06-09-2007, 08:02 PM
Wow, really great reviews so far. Noto, I especially liked your analysis of the score. Fun reads.

jefff
06-09-2007, 11:49 PM
I gotta go with "The Tingler" by William Castle. It has all the right ingredients for a horror/camp classic: a rubber creature on strings that attaches itself to your spine, a brilliant scene where blood is the only color shown in the entire b&w film, Vincent Price, the "Percepto" gimmick which shocked audiences in their theater chairs at appropriate places in the film, many great scares, a creepy blind & deaf woman- need I go on? The Tingler is a classic, and you need to see it. NOW.

RyanPC
06-10-2007, 12:37 AM
Summer Camp Nightmare

I think you took the term "camp classic" a bit too literally. :lol:

dwatts
06-10-2007, 01:04 AM
I'm going with The Giant Claw (which is soon to hit DVD). Why? The bird - which flies in from Space - looks like a big turkey, made out of wire and egg cartons. It eats a man alive as he parachutes down, and chases planes - evading radar magically. As is the requirement for such movies, it's got bad FX, bad writing, bad acting, and no score to talk of.

However, right at the end when the laughter is at it's loudesty, it pulls a bit of cinematic wonder - as the bird sinks to the bottom of the ocean, it's one giant claw protruding out of the water - if only it had given us the finger. It's a shot that will stay with you.

Yeah - The Giant Claw it is.

BloodMan
06-10-2007, 02:26 AM
Reptilicus!
The paper mache monster head speaks volumes... the "cartoony" poison it spits out... the "cartoony" man it eats in front of his family... the seriousness everyone in the cast emotes... Holy Jeez! Plus it has scrawny little wings on it's back that it never uses (though I have read in some foreign prints, this bitch takes flight) :)

Egg_Shen
06-10-2007, 02:38 AM
The first picture that came to my head was The Ultimate Warrior. It’s been a favorite of mine mainly for having Yul Brynner as a no nonsense street fighter who sells his formidable talents to the highest bidding gangs in post apocalypse New York. The films cheap and somewhat ugly, but the atmosphere is there and the climatic fight between Brynner and William Smith is one of the best.

KR~!
06-10-2007, 03:13 AM
Reptilicus!
Plus it has scrawny little wings on it's back that it never uses (though I have read in some foreign prints, this bitch takes flight) :)


He sure does:
http://www.niftyfiftyscifi.com/Reptile/repfly.JPG

UNCUT films are the best

onebyone
06-10-2007, 03:36 AM
http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/71BS42A5HZL.__.gif

Glen or Glenda.

Pull the string! Pull the string!

Is this a mess of a movie? Hell yeah it is. It's a disaster. A total mess - as was I when I first watched it. I had to pause the movie a few times to focus on breathing as I literally laughed myself sick. Good times. No movie has ever made me laugh that much. It made me an Edward D. Wood Jr. fan for life.

Pull the string! Pull the string!

bigdaddyhorse
06-10-2007, 03:54 AM
While probably not nearly old enough to considered "classic", the over-the-top campyness of Shark Attack 3 and House Of The Dead have a case and are my favorites.
I humbly submit them so as to be entered.

Erick H.
06-10-2007, 08:36 AM
In all of his years turning out gothic horror tales and macabre Brit anthology films,terror master Peter Cushing had never quite strayed into the truly odd depths of a fright flick like SHOCK WAVES.I first saw this low budget,Florida shot epic on a late night screening more than twenty years ago and I've never been able to shake the memory of it.One of only a handfull of horror pics that Cushing shot outside of the U.K.(As well as being one of only two pictures in which Cushing appeared in with fellow horror icon John Carradine),SHOCK WAVES,on paper,sounds totally idiotic.A group of pleasure boaters are beached during a strange solar phenomena off of an uncharted island,and,much to their surprise,find it overrun by amphibious Nazi zombies,undead stormtroopers left over from World War 2.No surprise,scar faced German hermit/war criminal Cushing turns out to have been the commander of the Zombie squad,but,quite unexpectedly,he turns out to be as scared of the grey jacketed,albino killing machines as everybody else.There's really no reason why white faced,blonde haired guys dressed as Kommandos who loiter around in wading pools or trudge along at the bottom of lagoons should be anything other than silly,but damned if director Ken Weiderhorn(EYES OF A STRANGER) doesn't manage to make them downright creepy.Add to this that these zombies are smart,and fast,and stalk their pray like professional killers rather than just being more staggering Romero knock offs and you'll begin to see how this film offers something a little bit differentfrom most "living dead" pictures.Nice ,eerie locations,solid acting,creepy electronic music and fun support from the always great Cushing (and a wonderfully seedy Carradine) make SHOCK WAVES an unheralded little gem,one that sticks with you long after the subtly chilling finale.I can truthfully say,if you only see one underwater Nazi zombie movie,make it SHOCK WAVES.

rhett
06-11-2007, 05:56 AM
You are right on with SHOCK WAVES, Erick. That's been one of the few horror movies whose atmosphere I haven't been able to shake from my head. Even if WEEKEND AT BERNIE'S II has forever ruined the concept of zombies underwater being scary for me, the menace of those underwater shots are unrivaled.

Thanks for all the other suggestions too, guys and gals. This is coming along nicely. Everyone should be posting here though, since it really takes only a couple words to enter the contest. Let's hear some more cult love.

mcchrist
06-11-2007, 06:34 AM
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/5186MVAZGKL._SS500_.jpg

Super Fuzz

My earliest movie theater memories. I loved the piss out of this one, my mom loathed it. One of the few movies I could watch at any time.

Noto
06-11-2007, 06:45 AM
My earliest movie theater memories. I loved the piss out of this one, my mom loathed it. One of the few movies I could watch at any time.

:lol: Superfuzz is AWESOME! I wish there was a really good DVD release.

RyanPC
06-11-2007, 07:54 AM
My favorite camp classic is also my favorite movie of all-time: Carrie! Any of you who doubt the campiness of this film need only examine Piper Laurie's mind-boggling, Oscar-nominated (!) performance as Carrie's mother, Margaret White. She gives Joan Crawford a run for her wire hangers in every department. Her deranged monologue near the end of the film is proof of that:

I should've killed myself when he put it in me. After the first time, before we were married, Ralph promised never again. He promised, and I believed him. But sin never dies. Sin never dies. At first, it was all right. We lived sinlessly. We slept in the same bed, but we never did it. And then, that night, I saw him looking down at me that way. We got down on our knees to pray for strength. I smelled the whiskey on his breath. Then he took me. He took me, with the stink of filthy roadhouse whiskey on his breath, and I liked it. I liked it! With all that dirty touching of his hands all over me. I should've given you to God when you were born, but I was weak and backsliding, and now the devil has come home.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j201/RyanPC_2006/carrie1.jpg

I was so caught up in this imaginary battle between the two queens of camp that I created a fake poster for the movie version:

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j201/RyanPC_2006/carriedearest.png

booper71
06-11-2007, 12:59 PM
The Contagion (1987)
one of my faves from the vhs era.
A man follows a three fold path to achieve his desires, wrought with a spooky vibe and a different atmosphere than other horror titles of the time.

wago70
06-11-2007, 06:46 PM
When Joan Crawford screams at you...even Troglodytes know best to obey. A seemingly uninteresting film - becomes a monster rampage flick with a Friday the 13th type of bodycount. Silly but fun (and surprisingly bloody).
With this made in England film and the very late '60's atmosphere, it almost has that flavor of a lost Hammer film of the era.
Also featuring an early appearance by genre favorite David Warbeck.

...is it true Joan Crawford had to use her car as her dressing room?
anyone? :D

wago70
06-11-2007, 06:50 PM
I gotta go with "The Tingler" by William Castle. It has all the right ingredients for a horror/camp classic: a rubber creature on strings that attaches itself to your spine, a brilliant scene where blood is the only color shown in the entire b&w film, Vincent Price, the "Percepto" gimmick which shocked audiences in their theater chairs at appropriate places in the film, many great scares, a creepy blind & deaf woman- need I go on? The Tingler is a classic, and you need to see it. NOW.

Don't forget Vincent Price tripping out on drugs! :lol:

satans-sadists
06-11-2007, 07:06 PM
Don't forget Vincent Price tripping out on drugs! :lol:

We caught The Tingler on the big screen last October at The Castro. The crowd lost it when Price went off the deep end! :D

satans-sadists
06-11-2007, 07:26 PM
Had to go with BLACK SAMURAI. Stars Jim Kelly (Enter the Dragon, Black Belt Jones). Directed by Al Adamson (Dracula VS Frankenstein, Satan's Sadists, Horror of the Blood Monsters).

Where else can you find the following all crammed into one movie: kung fu, white slavery ring, satanic midget henchmen, low-tech superspy gadgetry, hashish inspired dubbing, mismatched stuntmen of the wrong ethnicity, and so much more?

The best part is watching Jim Kelly with a straight face the whole time and taking it all 100% seriously! :lol:

Some excerpts for your enjoyment:

The ultimate jet pack: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dmsJ9JafhQ

Jim Kelly fights vulture: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4Z2-rOXlVE

Black Samurai trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbiJQob3U88

Workshed
06-11-2007, 08:14 PM
RAD (1986)

http://www.billallenrad.com/images/rad_2/movie_shots/Rad_poster.jpg

Fan-made trailer (http://youtube.com/watch?v=JMeD9nrpfeY&mode=related&search=)

Criminally unavailable (officially) on DVD, RAD was the first film I was ever obsessed with. I had a haircut like the main kid, I had a bike, and I liked that "Send Me an Angel" song when it played over anything in slow-motion; it was practically destiny that I would love this film. I am convinced RAD inspired the XGames. Anyone who sees it, man or woman, boy or girl, wants to ride a BMX bike backwards and make sweet slow-motion love to Lori Loughlin while "Send Me an Angel" plays on a killer boombox in the bedroom--with BMX posters on the wall, and those things are what the XGames are all about.

RAD even has a blonde-haired evil villain guy (think a poor man's William Zabka), complete with cronies (including the evil Cobra twins from the G.I. Joe cartoon, who wear matching uniforms of sort). Perfect. The babes all wear bikinis, the adults are clueless, and the high school kids look about 30. The plot serves only to showcase sweet BMX moves, far sweeter than any wheelies popped in your driveway. There are also about 237 bike races in this movie.

Why is RAD in all caps on the cover art? Because the movie is RADical. Is RAD perhaps an acronym? Maybe. If I thought it up, R would stand for Rad, A would stand for Awesome, and D would stand for raD.

RAD is rad. Rad!

rhett
06-11-2007, 09:31 PM
I thought I was the only one who liked "Send me an Angel" in slow motion. RAD was filmed where I live, and I once had the pleasure of walking along one of the film's distinctive tracks. I felt like a child again. Like Rebecca Donaldson was still within arms reach. It's been broadcast in HD, and actually looks pretty nice, so here's hoping it makes it to DVD. You know it would be awesome if the DVD looked like a bike tire, with a lock of Lori's hair included in each limited edition version. Please, god of DVD, send me an angel...right now.

Workshed
06-11-2007, 10:02 PM
I thought I was the only one who liked "Send me an Angel" in slow motion. RAD was filmed where I live, and I once had the pleasure of walking along one of the film's distinctive tracks. I felt like a child again. Like Rebecca Donaldson was still within arms reach. Filmed where you live? Fantastic.

It's been broadcast in HD, and actually looks pretty nice, so here's hoping it makes it to DVD. You know it would be awesome if the DVD looked like a bike tire, with a lock of Lori's hair included in each limited edition version. Please, god of DVD, send me an angel...right now.

...Right now. :D

jefff
06-11-2007, 10:27 PM
Don't forget Vincent Price tripping out on drugs! :lol:

:eek: Can't believe I forgot to mention that one! Love it!

rxfiend
06-11-2007, 11:15 PM
one of my favorite camp classics is The Killer Shrews. Any movie that tries to pass off dogs with rugs as giant shrews is pure gold in my book. The characters in the movie are so cliche, that it also adds to the camp factor. I think its funny these older scifi/horror films uses the most fucked up scientific explanations for whats going on in the films. lol. I'm surprised this bad boy hasn't been remade, though it'd probably be with CGI shrews.

Those who have not seen it, download it for free (the movie is PD) from:
http://www.archive.org/details/The_Killer_Shrews

bwana the clown
06-12-2007, 08:48 AM
Teenagers From Outer Space

An alien adolescent named Derek and a giant killer lobster
http://www.badmovies.org/othermovies/teenspace/teenspace7.jpg

'nuff said.

_pi_
06-12-2007, 01:16 PM
My favorite camp classic is another film starring camp-queen Joan Crawford:

What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?

You've got Joan, you've got Bette, that make-up and those wonderful lines of dialogue: "But you aaaahhh in that chair, Blanche!". Plus all the stories of on-set rivalry!

http://a564.ac-images.myspacecdn.com/01126/36/52/1126332563_l.jpg

It's just one of those fabulous movies. Almost as good is Hush ... Hush, Sweet Charlotte, starring Bette Davis and Olivia de Havilland replacing Crawford, who couldn't face more Bette. Good times, they must have been.

uradouche
06-12-2007, 04:00 PM
By Far...

The Toxic Avenger.

Still the best Troma movie - one of my favorites of all time. 2 of the greatest low-budget head crushing scenes of all time.

The Doctor
06-13-2007, 01:16 AM
The Swarm (I originally posted this on an MST3K board I frequent, but is such a good writeup I had to repost it):

A late-70's Irwin Allen production (red flag #1) about the attack of millions of African killer bees (red flag #2), who have been breeding with the gentler Nothern bee types, extending their territory nothward decade after decade. When a test of an Air Raid signal draws a swarm of these bees to an outpost, everyone is wiped out with the exception of entomologist Brad Crane. It's never explained how he survived or how he got into a silo for shelter. Instead, we get this lovely piece of dialogue:

[Crane's explanation of how he got inside a locked-down nuclear missile silo]
Brad Crane: That's a complicated story. It begins a year ago. But let's skip that.

There ya go.

Anyway, he joins with General Richard Widmark and Captain Katherine Ross (amazingly LIKE a Stepford Wife here) to stop the bees from migrating north and wiping out the USA.

Bad subplots? You got 'em. We have a love traingle between the Over The Hill gang of Olivia DeHavilland, Fred MacMurray and Ben Johnson, which ends when all three are killed in a bee-engineered train crash (I forgot to mention, these are INTELLIGENT killer bees. You may start laughing now). We have a nuclear power plant that is destroyed because of the bees, and a boy who survived a bee attack because, while he was on a picnic with his folks, he was sent to get the thermos and avoided being stung by the bees. Mom and Pop weren't so lucky.

Plus, every decision that Crane makes to stop the bees always results in the deaths of more people. This is our hero, ladies and gentlemen. You'll find yourself siding with antagonist Richard Widmark and his more sensible (not by much) solutions.

Leaps in logic are a plenty in this film. The Air Force is sent out with flamethrowers to torch a city of bees (didn't think the AIR FORCE would need flamethrowers). Crane's dumb-as-hell decisions to stop the bees humanely (Dude, these are KILLER BEES! I wouldn't think about humane treatment of them there...). All this and more!

Technical gaffes are a plenty too. From the IMDB:

Revealing mistakes: In the background, a paralyzed scientist in a wheelchair kicks a door open.


Continuity: Helena says they saw dead bee-covered soldiers outside, but no dead soldiers were in evidence earlier when the recon team enter the missile base.


Continuity: The morgue at the base only shows about a dozen bagged corpses, although over twice that number were visible earlier in the movie.


Continuity: Distance between Paul and the bees during the gasoline scene varies wildly depending on the POV of Paul or the bees.


Continuity: As Helena and Crane stroll during the train evacuation, scene changes from early evening to broad daylight.


Continuity: During the ambulance crash, the scene changes briefly from nighttime to broad daylight.


Revealing mistakes: When the stuntman crashes through the window of the base in Houston to fall to his 30-story death, hanging plants can be seen on the outside, revealing he is simply crashing from one room to another.


Anachronisms: The recon team use revolvers, although the standard military sidearm since the 1930s has been the Colt .45 Automatic or the Baretta 9mm.


Crew or equipment visible: As the flamethrower team sets a car on fire, you can briefly glimpse a film crew rushing up with water to put it out.


Errors in geography: A train approaches Houston with mountains in the background.


Errors in geography: When Crane and Helena are standing on the shores of the Gulf of Mexico, they are standing in front of a cliff. There are no cliffs on the Upper Texas coast.

Bad dialogue? You asked for it...

Brad Crane: We've been fighting a losing battle against the insects for fifteen years, but I never thought I'd see the final face-off in my lifetime. And I never dreamed, that it would turn out to be the bees. They've always been our friends.

Brad Crane: Are you endowing these bees with human motives? Like saving their fellow bees from captivity, or seeking revenge on Mankind?
General Thalius Slater: I always credit my enemy, no matter what he may be, with equal intelligence.

[The Air Force is torching Houston to get rid of the bees]
General Slater: Houston on fire. Will history blame me, or the bees?

[Crane has found something at the ravaged picnic site]
Brad Crane: [holding it up] Plastic. It's a piece of a plastic cup. There are pieces all around here.
[he starts pointing out the other fragments]
Brad Crane: Look. Look, there. There. There.
General Slater: What's so significant about that?
Brad Crane: I'm afraid to speculate. But, I think, the bees, did this.
Major Baker: Are you saying these bees eat plastic?
Brad Crane: No, no. But I'm wondering. Your American Honeybee has a weak mouth, that couldn't even break the skin, of a grape. But it looks like this species, is tearing up, plastic cups, possibly to line their hives. Now, if this is true, they didn't, just get here. I mean, the invasion, didn't, just now begin. They have been here some time. Breeding. Increasing.
General Slater: So?
Brad Crane: Well, suppose these bees, are using plastic, to insulate their hives.
General Slater: No bee is that smart.
Brad Crane: Suppose these African bees are.

[after Crane leaves the missile silo's mortuary]
Major Baker: I noticed Dr. Crane seemed uneasy in here.
Dr. Krim: I can't imagine why anyone would be uneasy around all these *dead men*. Can you, Major?

Brad Crane: These bees, General, are of joint concern, and they are killing Americans, without reference as to whether or not they have a serial number and are expected to salute YOU! So there will be no air drops of any kind until I give the OK!
General Slater: Your OK, huh? Then just possible I can persuade you to attack this particular swarm, now that we know where it is! Attack and eliminate it!
Brad Crane: Possibly, if you can explain to me, how you air drop chemicals, without killing the native insect life! If your chemical will kill the African bee, it will also kill the American bee, right?
General Slater: Right! And better a few American bees than a lot of AMERICAN PEOPLE!
Brad Crane: That is the point, general! The honey bee is vital to the environment! Every year in america, they pollinate six billion dollars worth of crops! If you kill the bee, you're gonna kill the crop! If you kill the plants, you'll kill the people! No! No, general! There will be no air drop, until we know exactly, what we are dropping, and where, and how! Excuse me!
[Crane storms off]

[Slater is about to attack the swarm with a highly toxic pesticide]
Brad Crane: General, if you use that, nothing will grow out there for the next ten years!
General Slater: Why worry about shaving when somebody's going to cut your head off!

[Watching Crane pray after Helena suffers toxic shock from a bee sting]
Major Baker: Can we really count on a scientist who prays?
General Slater: I wouldn't count on one who doesn't.

There's more, but these are just the highlights.

Let's not forget that, to make the bees scarier, Allen had each sting victim hallucinate a giant bee. This comes off more as SILLY than scary. Jesus, Allen didn't have a clue what he was doing.

Let's not forget this little end credits disclaimer:

"The African killer bee portrayed in this film bears absolutely no
relationship to the industrious, hard-working, American honey bee to which we are indebted for pollinating vital crops that feed our nation."

There's also unintentional racism when the characters start to refer to the bees as "the Africans." Apparently, nobody read the script to fix this little error.

Despite all of these flaws, I love it's little campy heart. Irwin Allen made one of the best comedies of the 70s, and didn't set out to do that.

SaviniFan
06-13-2007, 01:22 AM
:lol: Superfuzz is AWESOME! I wish there was a really good DVD release.

There is: Super Fuzz DVD @ Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Super-Fuzz-Terence-Hill/dp/B000J4OYNQ/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/104-5801733-2731932?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1181694055&sr=8-1)

I own this and saw it in theaters when I was young too. Great flick!

thrashard76
06-13-2007, 06:25 AM
I'll give a nod to this one:

http://images2.dvdempire.com/gen/movies/45310h.jpg

A popcorn movie all the way, it's a fun little zombie romp from inside a nuclear factory out to the open. Loads of hilarious dialogue, complete with bad voice over dubbing and goofy action scenes galore. Not to mention the visual carnage that takes place when the zombies rip those dunderheads to bits, all to the beat of a pretty groovy soundtrack.

MorallySound
06-13-2007, 08:03 PM
http://img502.imageshack.us/img502/6606/ee111om3.jpg

The Dirt Bike Kid (1985)
I grew up watching Peter Billingsly ride a dirt bike that came alive and would flash it's brights at bad guys. What's not to love about this campy comedy? You get a supercharged flying dirt bike, fat bad guys trying to demolish a hot dog stand, dirt bike racing, and that classic 80's kid-conquers-big business storyline. Charming, campy, fun, and a childhood favorite of mine. This is my campy classic! NOW WHERE IS THE FRICKEN' DVD!?!

indiephantom
06-13-2007, 08:36 PM
I have to go with Sleepaway Camp. This film managed to give us the creeps when we were younger and has (for better or worse) stayed with many of us and gone into our collections in one of the more memorable boxsets.

I love seeing this again every time I do. There is some priceless dialogue..."eat shit and live"...and the mother is creepier than the dead Mrs. Bates.

I first saw it a party with about nine other kids my age in junior high. We were freaked about the weird sexuality and violence and we laughed (even then) at the production values. Seeing it again, I kind of marvel at the discontinuity in scenes, but that kind of problem typically works in the favor of genre stuff of the period and the "rough-around-the-edge" qualities make it seem more "grindhouse", which is certainly is.

But this is one to see under a big tent, and outside with a bunch of kids at a summer camp back in the eighties. Ah, summer camp memories were of more than Crystal Lake.

deplop cinema
06-14-2007, 10:09 PM
BLOOD LAKE!!!
http://imdb.com/title/tt0299551/
When a bunch of drunken redneck teenagers spend two weeks at a lake with a videocamera, Blood Lake is the glorious result. Thank god this movie exists.

X-human
06-16-2007, 05:23 AM
I kept wanting to type up something clever but since we're down to the wire:

Batman: The Movie

I loved it as a kid. I use to walked two miles to the rental store and check it out with my weekly allowance money. My dad made me walk because he was sick of me asking him to drive there. My favorite bit was always with the cartoon explosive, "Some days you just can't get rid of a bomb." Classic. The fact that Lee Meriwether as Catwoman caught my eye as a small lad probably explains a few things too...

Erick H.
06-16-2007, 06:26 AM
I kept wanting to type up something clever but since we're down to the wire:

Batman: The Movie

I loved it as a kid. I use to walked two miles to the rental store and check it out with my weekly allowance money. My dad made me walk because he was sick of me asking him to drive there. My favorite bit was always with the cartoon explosive, "Some days you just can't get rid of a bomb." Classic. The fact that Lee Meriwether as Catwoman caught my eye as a small lad probably explains a few things too...

I was lucky enough to have caught this one at a drive-in in the late 70's on a triple bill,it's great fun.I treasure the memory of Adam West dangling from a rope ladder,punching a rubber shark in the head.Thank God for the Bat-Shark Repelent !

rhett
06-16-2007, 08:13 AM
The contest is closed, thanks for the numerous submissions, it was great to see the movies that everyone loves and the reasons why you all love them.

Winners will be picked tomorrow sometime. Look for another contest very soon!

Egg_Shen
06-17-2007, 03:30 PM
Teenagers From Outer Space

An alien adolescent named Derek and a giant killer lobster
http://www.badmovies.org/othermovies/teenspace/teenspace7.jpg

'nuff said.

Hey, I've actually seen that. If I remember correctly it used the same library music as Night of the Living Dead. Baaaad movie, but fun.

rhett
06-17-2007, 05:57 PM
Thanks to the fine folks at RANDOM.ORG, our winners are:

First place:
MorallySound

Second Place:
Erick H.

Third Place:
RyanPC

Congrats to the winners, and thanks to everyone who made this a fun little sharing ground with their cult posts. Winners, please contact me with your shipping information and I will have your prizes out by Monday.

MorallySound
06-17-2007, 06:50 PM
Wow. Crazy! THANKS!

Congrats to the other winners! And what a great thread to find out about great fun movies!

Hellbilly
06-17-2007, 07:20 PM
Congrats! :)

onebyone
06-17-2007, 07:21 PM
Congrats to the winners!

I hope we have more easy going contests like this one. This was fun. Of course, I may just be saying that because I can't photoshop at all and I enjoyed at least having a chance of winning something.

Noto
06-17-2007, 08:14 PM
Congrats to all.

and please, someone, release a good DVD of RAD.

MorallySound
06-18-2007, 12:27 AM
and please, someone, release a good DVD of RAD.

And the Dirt Bike Kid!

Luna
06-18-2007, 05:07 AM
WOOHOO, congrats guys! :banana:

thrashard76
06-18-2007, 06:23 AM
Congrats.

Erick H.
06-18-2007, 07:00 AM
Thanks a lot Rhett,I really appreciate it !

Workshed
06-18-2007, 03:35 PM
Congrats to the winners!

I hope we have more easy going contests like this one. This was fun. Of course, I may just be saying that because I can't photoshop at all and I enjoyed at least having a chance of winning something.

Congrats to all.

and please, someone, release a good DVD of RAD.

Word-a-rock. Great contest idea. Congrats to the winners.

Wez4555
06-18-2007, 05:03 PM
damn i missed this. i could write a book about how awesome redneck zombies is. oh well, congrats the winners.

indiephantom
06-20-2007, 04:44 PM
congrats to the winners! Cool contest.