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rhett
10-18-2007, 09:01 AM
Rhett's Halloween List 2007

Making a list this year was tough for me. Itís been my fifth list here with the site, and going back over my ones prior, I was noting the classics I hadnít included before. A Nightmare on Elm Street, Night of the Living Dead, The Evil Dead, Frankenstein, Saw. Since I always try to include a slate of different picks this year, I thought now might be a good time to pay my respects. I just couldnít though. For me, Halloween watching is all about a certain feel. Itís a precipitous balance between things mostly superficial. Like cracked autumn leaves, I like my films of October to rough and often unpolished. And like a vista of bare trees, fallen leaves and little children prancing around en masque, I think Halloween horror, above all, must posses a firm sense of place. I remember the holiday for the orange hues, the decaying vegetation and the chill in the air. Thus this yearís picks, a ragtag batch of tidings, will be those movies that ďfeelĒ Halloween, even if they donít necessarily say it.

http://horrordvds.com/reviews/misc/h2k7/demons.jpg


10. Demons (1985)

Open up your invitation and get the party started with this Argento-Bava blood bath. Itís a horror fanís dream Ė random people are selected for an advance screening of the latest horror film. They shuffle into an aged theater and let the flickering of light take them to the darkest sides of their mind. Yet when theater-goers start turning into bloodthirsty demons themselves, the fourth wall makes 3D seem tame. I usually like to get the night started with a party movie, like Popcorn in 2004. While this is similar in setting, itís coarser in execution. The clay-mold gore, the loud rock score and the messier European sexuality all converge for whatís the perfect beginning to North Americaís most haunted of holidays.


http://horrordvds.com/reviews/misc/h2k7/dangerous.jpg


9. The Most Dangerous Game (1932)

Forget demons, vampires, ghosts or gorillas, the scariest predator in horror has always been man himself. Irving Pichel and Ernest B. Schoedsackís The Most Dangerous Game goes one further by having man hunting himself for sport. The film is brisk at only an hour long, but yet the directors are able to not only translate the effective prose of the source material, but more importantly, they are able to really encapsulate the feeling of the wild outdoors. Filmed on the sets that would eventually become famous with their King Kong a year later, the film effectively uses the jungle to emphasize the beast that lurks within every man. Leslie Banksí Count Zaroff is one of horrorís greatest villains, but itís the jungle that trumps him. It captures an atmosphere that can only truly be felt on Hallowsí eve, where the inescapable presence of dying trees and changing seasons overwhelm.


http://horrordvds.com/reviews/misc/h2k7/burial.jpg


8. Burial Ground (1981)

Another messy Italian movie here, Burial Ground takes prosthetic work to a whole new realm of decrepit morbidity. Thereís a sort of dark art at how torn, ravaged and decayed the zombies that lurch afoul throughout appear. They move with such pain and look of such horrible death that when the notorious man-child Peter Bark utters the line ďThis cloth smells of deathĒ, you kind of know what he means. In terms of nihilistic horror, this is truly a scary film. Itís scary, too, in the way Andrea Bianchi weaves this disturbing incestual, Oedipal tryst between mother and son as Peter Bark tears into horrorís most painful breast feeding. Itís a gross, rotting beast of a movie, and like the ghouls that make up the mythology of our holiday, it wonít soon be forgotten.


http://horrordvds.com/reviews/misc/h2k7/pit.jpg


7. The Pit (1981)

If ever there was an actual child as disturbed and demented as Peter Barkís Michael in Burial Groundł it was Sammy Snyderís Jamie in The Pit. While Bark was inexplicably 26 when he did Burial Ground, Snyders wasnít much older than 12 when he unearthed this violent autistic child who does whatever his talking teddy tells him. Thereís an uncomfortable duality to our appropriation of the character, at first wanting to sympathize with his condition, but later feeling revolt when itís clear his only purpose is to throw the people he dislikes into a pit of monsters as their main course. A colleague over at Canuxploitation.com called the film ďa unique concoction of Canadian horror movie and After-School Special gone terribly, terribly wrong.Ē Thatís certainly what makes it notable today, but what makes it a Halloween favorite of mine is precisely that evocation of the Canadian fall. Jamieís pit is located deep in a wood filled of yellowed leaves, and the whole film exudes that chilly Canadiana to such degree that when one of the characters goes skinny dipping, you too feel the cold. So seemingly indebted to this hallowed holiday, The Pit makes sure to play a ten minute trick or treating murder not once, but twice throughout the film.


http://www.horrordvds.com/reviews/n-z/shining/shining_fs.jpg


6. The Shining (1980)

Even though the majority of the film takes place in the dead of winter and in the dead of one manís mind, the power and presence of that opening drive up to the Overlook weighs over every frame. That opening drive, with those long, ghostly aerial shots as the leaves are starting to change color and the hotel patrons are starting to go home, is emblematic of the entire film. Itís a long, steady descent into madness, changing from father to feral like the seasons change from summer to autumn. Set to that ominous orchestral score and those endless running credits, Kubrick does the ultimate in personification, turning a season into psychosis. Before The Shining, Halloween was just a holiday, and fall just a season.


http://www.horrordvds.com/reviews/a-m/christine-se/christine-se_fronts.jpg


5. Christine (1983)

In Canada, especially in the northern nook where I grew up, fall hits a lot earlier than late October. Indeed, it starts more around those back to school days of early September. Itís for this reason that I always end up linking school, fall and Halloween into one synonymous entity. Of that trinity, John Carpenterís Christine represents it best. Carpenter nails the zeitgeist of high school life, while at the same time nailing the inescapable evil within that damned Plymouth Fury, that same evil that the ritual of Halloween aims to expunge. Yet what has always interested me most is Keith Gordonís Arnie, a messy and awkward character like Sammy Snydersí or Peter Barkís characters mentioned above. At once nerdy, pathetic, strong and self-confident heís a timid creature with an ego out of control. Heís a fascinating character to watch, and if we are to personify fall like Kubrick wanted us to, then like leaves raked or bags of candy dumped, Arnie is horrorís crazy collage of differences.


http://horrordvds.com/reviews/misc/h2k7/snuff.jpg


4. Snuff (1976)

If fall to me means an unclassifiable untidiness in the atmosphere, then Snuffís notorious finale of a woman having her insides torn out on camera is definitely a fitting image. While this is no doubt the filmís highpoint and claim to fame, itís the rest of the story that really gives it sustenance. Basically, before it switches gears and becomes a snuff film, Snuff is actually a shoddy patchwork of psychedelic Manson-era fears. Well before Kill Bill, it involves a group of female assassins under the command of a ruthless Satanic leader. Thereís plenty of ritual and madness, and even more bad acting and piss poor production values. Yet like Halloween itself, itís often hard to describe just what makes the event so lingering and memorable. I canít truly explain why I love Snuff, or why it fits into my Halloween list, but I can feel it. It has that atmosphere, that dodgy, parched Mexican grit to it that just feels like fall. It's rough around the edges, and I like it.


http://horrordvds.com/reviews/misc/h2k7/inferno.jpg


3. L'inferno (1911)

The most hauntingly beautiful of all silent films, Bertoliniís Líinferno is a magnificent journey into the depths hell and the height of the imagination. Based on Danteís descriptions of hell in his The Divine Comedy, the film is packed with amazing in camera visuals, using both optics and those Italian clay-based make-up effects to make some gross and grandiose visions. But like a leaf crumbled or a statue cracked, Líinferno is a thing of beauty aged to a whole new meaning. Nearly a hundred years old, the print is missing frames, jumpy and scratched to bits, but itís those imperfections that give it a character above the imagery of the film. It represents a life lived, history made, and in its messy reconstruction, like a ghost, itís something that will never fade away.


http://horrordvds.com/reviews/misc/h2k7/grey.jpg


2. Four Flies on Grey Velvet (1971)

Easily Argentoís messiest film, his battles with his composer, his financers and his actors manifests itself in all the discontinuity of the sound and images in the film. It really feels like some brilliant rough cut, one of amazing vision thatís been shown in dailies without refinement. Yet itís stayed that way, and compared to the distinguished but duller The Cat oí Nine Tails prior, it has an infectious zest for life. Argento has always been a master at making his images seem alive with their colors and their movement, but here with Four Flies on Grey Velvet he seemingly does it in between those frames. He shows the fragility of film, how itís all an assembly that can just as easily be torn apart, eviscerated and mutilated like any human could by Michael Myers on that night of nights.


http://www.horrordvds.com/reviews/a-m/halloween2/halloween2_fs.jpg


1. Halloween II (1980)

Thanks to a one Robert Zombie, I really have no desire to watch the original Halloween, even on the night that calls for it. No, right now I wouldnít even touch it with a ten foot pole, for fear that somehow Zombieís sophomoric stinker of a film will somehow tarnish all the things I love about Carpenterís original. So instead, I turn to a sequel I generally donít hold much affection for, but one that seems fitting this year in my personifying of fallís decay. In Halloween II, Michaelís mask looks rattier, his murders gorier, and his world a scarier place. Children bite down on apples filled with razor blades. Pranks turn into backdrafts of bloodshed. Hell, in this film you canít even make a sandwich. Carpenter portrays Michael, with his disappearing acts and those long floating Panaglide shots, as some kind of phantom in the original. Here though, heís a living, breathing monster in a world thatís equally as scummy and reprehensible. Iíve always found this film to be the shoddiest looking of the series, even under Dean Cundeyís masterful hand. Yet here, for me, and at this point in my life, that grungy veneer somehow seems to fit. So watch this at the end of the night and take in that glorious mess that the fall season brings. For when Michael starts bleeding from the eyes, youíll know itís lights out on another season of exploring the darkest art that is death.

Hellbilly
10-18-2007, 09:34 AM
Any list that includes The Shining is fine with me :)

and hell, The Pit is another great addition.

Mok
10-18-2007, 03:13 PM
Nice list. I'll have to check out The Pit. Realizing this thread could easily turn into a Halloween debate, let me get things going by saying that I know what you mean about watching the original now. I actually really enjoyed Zombie's version and somehow I find the concept of watching Carpenter's unappealing for some reason. I still love it and I dare not imply that it's obsolete, but there's something there keeping me from wanting to watch it again. Maybe after the novelty of Zombie's version fades I'll be able to distinguish and justify why I would go back to Carpenter's over wanting to watch Zombie's.

Funny that you put part 2 on your list because I was really hoping Zombie would include those events in the remake since he truncated the events of the original. I would actually have rather seen..
..the final fight with Lori, in the theatrical cut of Zombie's film, happen in the Hospital rather than the rafters of the house. It could have totally worked in the story, capping it off nicely with a bonus tribute to Carpenter's second film.

speanroc
10-18-2007, 03:25 PM
i like the list RHETT , a very refreshing surprise of films .....5 stars

Ash J. Williams
10-18-2007, 04:36 PM
What? No Blair Witch?

Paff
10-18-2007, 04:50 PM
What? No Blair Witch?

Well, I won't be doing an "official" top ten list, since I 'm no longer a full-time reviewer (hell, I'm not a part-time reviewer either) at the site. But if I did do a top ten, Blair Witch would still be number one.

And I have not seen Zombie's Halloween (nor will I ever), so the original stays untarnished in my mind.

cinaphile
10-18-2007, 08:19 PM
Wow Rhett, I'm astounded by your list... most of which is completely off my radar. Consequently, I've got a lot of catching up to do this Halloween! Have you read the interview with Ian Stuart the screenwriter of The Pit? http://www.badmovies.org/interviews/ianstuart/
He definitely doesn't share your fondness for the movie.
Here's my partial list for required Halloween viewing.
As with any recommendation, take it at your own risk! I can guarantee that if you liked Urban Legends 2: The Final Cut or Dark Asylum my list won't interest you.

Stepford Wives (1975)
This is one of the best horror films that is rooted in social commentary. Stepford Wives is a very dark and horrific look at the ultimate backlash for the feminist movement. It seems the men/husbands of Stepford Connecticut want their free thinking wives to stop all that thinking and devote more time to their domestic chores. Katherine Ross is the newest denizen of Stepford and she can't seem to understand why all the women in Stepford like to do nothing more than cook, clean and have perfectly orgasmic sex with their husbands. The horror kicks in when her two closest friends change from being fun and intellectual to monosyllabic housefraus. Her desperate pleas to a psychiatrist her husband insists she visit, puts a very human face on why Stepford it so scary. Is there something in the water? Is it in her head? Is having the perfect home so terrible even if it is your only goal in life? This a great film that still has quite a bit of relevance considering the plight of women in some foreign countries. (And even here in the United States) Considering the train wreck of a remake done in 2004, the 1974 version only looks more impressive.

Dead of Night (1945)
Original films are hard to find. No surprise that Dead of Night may seem familiar. The premise of this film, a group of people all come together and eventually share ghost stories that they've heard, has been ripped off in various ways. Even the final ghost story about a ventriloquist and his not so lifeless dummy has seen incarnations on The Twilight Zone and in the movies Devil Doll and Magic. Still, movie lovers owe it to themselves to check out the very well done original. This is a classic piece of horror that has only gotten better despite the familiar trappings.

The Eye & Juon: The Grudge (2002)
Got to have some Asian entries to be fair. Despite the mean spirited backlash that the American remakes generated toward the Asian horror invasion, these two still deserve recognition.

PIN (1988)
"They fuck you up, your mum and dad..." (Phillip Larkin, poet)
So many horror film work the angle of family dysfunction to create a psycho lead character. I tend to like these film because they adhere to the idea that the making of a monster is just as interesting as what the monster does. PIN illustrates this idea perfectly. What happens when your father is a doctor who never communicates directly when explaining the ways of the world? What happens when your mother is germ freak that won't allow you play with the other kids in the neighborhood? What happens when your only friends and confidants are your sexually promiscuous sister and an anatomical medical dummy? Remember, mum and dad, you reap what you sow.

The Haunting (1963)
I hate cgi. (computer generated images) Okay, so maybe cgi isn't so bad except that it's being so abused in respect to the horror genre. The best way to illustrate this is to compare both the original version of The Haunting and its remake. The 1963 version is the granddaddy of all haunted house films. (Maybe the only exception to this is The Old Dark House.) Adapted from the novel by Shirley Jackson, this film builds up its tense atmosphere with shadows, noises, cinematography, cryptic dialogue and great acting. It's what you don't see that will scare you in the 1963 version. By comparison the 1999 remake a swirling mess of cgi effects that are supposed to divert the viewer from the gaping holes in the plot. No need for subtlety when you can create a bed that attacks it's sleeping companion. The Haunting from 1963 is mandatory viewing. This is how a haunted house film should be done.

Session 9 (2001)
How this movie slipped through the cracks astounds me. This is a deceptive little gem of a horror movie. Crisply filmed with a digital camera at an actual abandoned psychiatric hospital, Session 9 successfully unfolds into a dark investigation of the fine line between sanity and insanity. This film observes a blue collar hazmat crew who are recruited to clean up the aforementioned asylum. Session 9 dissects their crumbling lives, masked hostility and personal interaction with cinematic precision. Yes, the devil is in the details in regard to this film. The cast, made up of Peter Mullen, Brendan Sexton III, Josh Lucas and David Caruso, are fantastic.

May (2002)
May has subtext, characters with an emotional arch and a definitive cinematic style. The horror of real life isn't chainsaw wielding maniacs, it's the family and friends we encounter from the day we're born. Whether it's a misguided parent trying to help you overcome a physical impairment or your classmate who torment you for being different, horror is the emotional detachment that these people cause. It's the details that create a monster. It's also the details that will be it's own undoing. The last half hour of May is extremely grueling. I was filled with equal amounts sadness and horror. May doesn't have the easy scares I usually look for, but rather a gut wrenching sense of dread. May succeeds on many levels. Angela Bettis rocks in the title roll. I met her at the recent FanExpo in Toronto and she was amazingly candid and friendly.

Elvira: Mistress of the Dark (1998)
Okay, I'm a cynic. Okay, I often call films "cinema" when really it's just a "movie." Okay, I thought Elvira: Mistress of the Dark was going to be a brainless exercise in wasted celluloid. I was told by a friend that I had serious misjudged it and that is was actually quite funny. I caved in and watched Elvira and have to say it was hilarious. Comedy is a hard genre to get right. I think it fair to say that Elvira is not a high-brow type of comedy but it is intelligent and campy. I watch this every Halloween without fail!:D

Agent Z
10-18-2007, 08:37 PM
The Shining is an awesome film, but like Dave's pick of JC's The Thing, I save it for the winter, when it really fits the time of the year.

I'm intrigued by The Pit and will have to use a Netflix queue space on that title now. Ditto for L'inferno, which I'm hoping to get now before Halloween. Thanks for not picking just the usual suspects (ala The Blair Witch Project) as sometimes happens on these type of lists. :)

shithead
10-19-2007, 08:24 AM
Whoa, never heard of L'inferno, definitely putting that on my wishlist.

rhett
10-19-2007, 09:19 AM
Wow Rhett, I'm astounded by your list... most of which is completely off my radar. Consequently, I've got a lot of catching up to do this Halloween! Have you read the interview with Ian Stuart the screenwriter of The Pit? http://www.badmovies.org/interviews/ianstuart/
He definitely doesn't share your fondness for the movie.
Here's my partial list for required Halloween viewing.
As with any recommendation, take it at your own risk! I can guarantee that if you liked Urban Legends 2: The Final Cut or Dark Asylum my list won't interest you.

Stepford Wives (1975)
This is one of the best horror films that is rooted in social commentary. Stepford Wives is a very dark and horrific look at the ultimate backlash for the feminist movement. It seems the men/husbands of Stepford Connecticut want their free thinking wives to stop all that thinking and devote more time to their domestic chores. Katherine Ross is the newest denizen of Stepford and she can't seem to understand why all the women in Stepford like to do nothing more than cook, clean and have perfectly orgasmic sex with their husbands. The horror kicks in when her two closest friends change from being fun and intellectual to monosyllabic housefraus. Her desperate pleas to a psychiatrist her husband insists she visit, puts a very human face on why Stepford it so scary. Is there something in the water? Is it in her head? Is having the perfect home so terrible even if it is your only goal in life? This a great film that still has quite a bit of relevance considering the plight of women in some foreign countries. (And even here in the United States) Considering the train wreck of a remake done in 2004, the 1974 version only looks more impressive.

Dead of Night (1945)
Original films are hard to find. No surprise that Dead of Night may seem familiar. The premise of this film, a group of people all come together and eventually share ghost stories that they've heard, has been ripped off in various ways. Even the final ghost story about a ventriloquist and his not so lifeless dummy has seen incarnations on The Twilight Zone and in the movies Devil Doll and Magic. Still, movie lovers owe it to themselves to check out the very well done original. This is a classic piece of horror that has only gotten better despite the familiar trappings.

The Eye & Juon: The Grudge (2002)
Got to have some Asian entries to be fair. Despite the mean spirited backlash that the American remakes generated toward the Asian horror invasion, these two still deserve recognition.

PIN (1988)
"They fuck you up, your mum and dad..." (Phillip Larkin, poet)
So many horror film work the angle of family dysfunction to create a psycho lead character. I tend to like these film because they adhere to the idea that the making of a monster is just as interesting as what the monster does. PIN illustrates this idea perfectly. What happens when your father is a doctor who never communicates directly when explaining the ways of the world? What happens when your mother is germ freak that won't allow you play with the other kids in the neighborhood? What happens when your only friends and confidants are your sexually promiscuous sister and an anatomical medical dummy? Remember, mum and dad, you reap what you sow.

The Haunting (1963)
I hate cgi. (computer generated images) Okay, so maybe cgi isn't so bad except that it's being so abused in respect to the horror genre. The best way to illustrate this is to compare both the original version of The Haunting and its remake. The 1963 version is the granddaddy of all haunted house films. (Maybe the only exception to this is The Old Dark House.) Adapted from the novel by Shirley Jackson, this film builds up its tense atmosphere with shadows, noises, cinematography, cryptic dialogue and great acting. It's what you don't see that will scare you in the 1963 version. By comparison the 1999 remake a swirling mess of cgi effects that are supposed to divert the viewer from the gaping holes in the plot. No need for subtlety when you can create a bed that attacks it's sleeping companion. The Haunting from 1963 is mandatory viewing. This is how a haunted house film should be done.

Session 9 (2001)
How this movie slipped through the cracks astounds me. This is a deceptive little gem of a horror movie. Crisply filmed with a digital camera at an actual abandoned psychiatric hospital, Session 9 successfully unfolds into a dark investigation of the fine line between sanity and insanity. This film observes a blue collar hazmat crew who are recruited to clean up the aforementioned asylum. Session 9 dissects their crumbling lives, masked hostility and personal interaction with cinematic precision. Yes, the devil is in the details in regard to this film. The cast, made up of Peter Mullen, Brendan Sexton III, Josh Lucas and David Caruso, are fantastic.

May (2002)
May has subtext, characters with an emotional arch and a definitive cinematic style. The horror of real life isn't chainsaw wielding maniacs, it's the family and friends we encounter from the day we're born. Whether it's a misguided parent trying to help you overcome a physical impairment or your classmate who torment you for being different, horror is the emotional detachment that these people cause. It's the details that create a monster. It's also the details that will be it's own undoing. The last half hour of May is extremely grueling. I was filled with equal amounts sadness and horror. May doesn't have the easy scares I usually look for, but rather a gut wrenching sense of dread. May succeeds on many levels. Angela Bettis rocks in the title roll. I met her at the recent FanExpo in Toronto and she was amazingly candid and friendly.

Elvira: Mistress of the Dark (1998)
Okay, I'm a cynic. Okay, I often call films "cinema" when really it's just a "movie." Okay, I thought Elvira: Mistress of the Dark was going to be a brainless exercise in wasted celluloid. I was told by a friend that I had serious misjudged it and that is was actually quite funny. I caved in and watched Elvira and have to say it was hilarious. Comedy is a hard genre to get right. I think it fair to say that Elvira is not a high-brow type of comedy but it is intelligent and campy. I watch this every Halloween without fail!:D
Hey, I like URBAN LEGEND: FINAL CUT and I still have much to appreciate from that list! :D

Great job on that though, incredibly thorough and definitely a nice read. PIN's a definite Canadian favorite (kind of along the awkward line of THE PIT, actually) and your recommendation for ELVIRA reminds me how despite enjoying all those priceless introductions from her old VHS line-up, I've never seen her debut. Thanks for that link for THE PIT too, I'll check it out in a few.

Workshed
10-21-2007, 10:18 PM
Great list, rhett. I'm definitely going to try to find Burial Ground. Nice #1 pick, too--that's what I chose as my slasher contest pick, given how many picks went to the original and other classics. H2 is a romp of a sequel, a bloody blunt object of a film.

dwatts
10-22-2007, 12:34 AM
Good call on L'inferno. We had a thread HERE (http://www.horrordvds.com/vb3forum/showthread.php?t=21662).

Now, if only someone would do a DVD with a soundtrack that didn't make you want to throw the disc into a swamp.

Shock Waves
10-22-2007, 12:51 AM
9. The Most Dangerous Game (1932)

Forget demons, vampires, ghosts or gorillas, the scariest predator in horror has always been man himself. Irving Pichel and Ernest B. Schoedsackís The Most Dangerous Game goes one further by having man hunting himself for sport. The film is brisk at only an hour long, but yet the directors are able to not only translate the effective prose of the source material, but more importantly, they are able to really encapsulate the feeling of the wild outdoors. Filmed on the sets that would eventually become famous with their King Kong a year later, the film effectively uses the jungle to emphasize the beast that lurks within every man. Leslie Banksí Count Zaroff is one of horrorís greatest villains, but itís the jungle that trumps him. It captures an atmosphere that can only truly be felt on Hallowsí eve, where the inescapable presence of dying trees and changing seasons overwhelm.





Your list is quite eclectic. I am impressed. I especially like your inclusion of Schoedsackís The Most Dangerous Game. Incredible film.
I am also intrigued by your thoughts on L'inferno.

dwatts
10-22-2007, 12:55 AM
I rewatch The Most Dangerous Game regularly. It's a nice little film, and only runs a little over an hour. I recently read the short story on which it is based too. The Criterion disc is priceless.

indiephantom
10-22-2007, 03:46 AM
Christine, The Shining, Halloween II. Absolutely perfect for the mood I'm in. Really well written list...H2 is the Myers film for this year.

Mok
12-17-2007, 05:01 PM
I watched The Pit finally. Interesting film, not sure about "Halloween Top 10" worthiness though.

There were some ideas that never got seen through like Teddy's powers and how the Troglodites(spelling :P ) exist or why. I thought killing off the main character undermined the film a little too.


Over all it was a neat little movie.

Hellgate is fucking awesomely shitty though. :D

rhett
12-17-2007, 05:24 PM
I always took the Tralalogs (easier to type :D) as a physical manifestation of the boy's subconscious. In the book he's more explicitly autistic, so where one area of the brain is lacking, perhaps a new dimension is available. I took Teddy the same way too, and it was all kind of nice to see a different kind of boy get his time of self-empowerment. Of course what he's doing is wrong, so naturally he'll have to get a taste of his own medicine. You let your guard down for love and then what! Poor, poor Jaime.

Mok
12-17-2007, 06:42 PM
At one point I was thinking that too, about the T-logs (ha, beat that!) being his subconscious, but then they escaped and other people saw them and even described them, so I was left taking them literal. I had no idea there was a book though! :eek1: I forgot to mention, his Halloween costume was kick-ass

rhett
12-18-2007, 01:53 AM
Since it was made right when Cronenberg and his physical manifestations of the mind were hitting their peak here in Canada with THE BROOD, I took it that the T's (ha!) were indeed real, but still just externalizations of the boy's libido (much like the little brood children are demons of Samantha Eggar's mind). Of course, that could all be bullshit, but even without that the movie's tone, little Sammy Snyders and that red-eyed teddy make it more than worthy.

I think they too thought his costume was great, because why else would they play that scene twice in the movie? ;)