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View Full Version : 720p vs 1080p on a 32" TV...any noticeable difference?


Matt89
05-15-2008, 05:25 AM
Ok...

I'm looking to get an HDTV for my bedroom. I'm thinking about getting the 32" Sharp Aquos, however I'm a bit lost as to which one to get. There's a 1080p TV (which is $1199.99 at Best Buy) or a 720p/1080i (which is $798.99 at Best Buy). I've been told by numerous people that you won't be able to tell the difference between 1080p and 720p on a 32" TV, since 1080p is only really noticeable on larger screens. People have told me you only start noticing the difference from about 40" onwards. What I'm wondering is...

Is this true?

I don't want to spend an extra $400 on a 1080p if I won't be able to tell the difference between that and 720p. Mind you, I'll be watching the TV from about 8-9 feet away. I plan on getting a Blu-ray player, but what my main question is....is it worth the extra $400 to go for the 1080p over the 720p and well...is there much of a difference (if any) at 32"?

Thanks.

~Matt

Workshed
05-15-2008, 07:00 AM
I think in the HD thread I started, I posted a link from the editors at CNET where they stated that under 50", you can't tell the difference.

Still, why not go to Best Buy and look for yourself?

Matt89
05-15-2008, 07:04 AM
I think in the HD thread I started, I posted a link from the editors at CNET where they stated that under 50", you can't tell the difference.

Still, why not go to Best Buy and look for yourself?

Well, I went into Best Buy and because they have so many HDTVs on display, the HD signal was being split through all of them and thus you aren't seeing "true" HD. It's not an accurate representation of the TV's HD capabilities.

~Matt

KamuiX
05-15-2008, 07:36 AM
I still say it's BS about not being able to see the difference on a smaller TV...I had a 32" Philips/Magnavox 720p/1080i for a year, and upgraded to a Philips/Magnavox 37" 1080p, and I TOTALLY noticed the difference on games and Blu-Ray's. Maybe the newer 1080p model is just a better built TV, but there's no doubt everything about that TV is better than the 720p.

baggio
05-15-2008, 08:14 AM
Ok...

I'm looking to get an HDTV for my bedroom. I'm thinking about getting the 32" Sharp Aquos, however I'm a bit lost as to which one to get. There's a 1080p TV (which is $1199.99 at Best Buy) or a 720p/1080i (which is $798.99 at Best Buy). I've been told by numerous people that you won't be able to tell the difference between 1080p and 720p on a 32" TV, since 1080p is only really noticeable on larger screens. People have told me you only start noticing the difference from about 40" onwards. What I'm wondering is...



I can tell you that you can see a difference (on a 32') between a 720p and a 1080p 120mhz Was that 32' a 1080p 120mhz or a 60mhz?

I was recently at Best Buy also. And they had three TV's next to each other. Starting from the left. Sony 720p , Toshiba 720p, and then a Sony 1080p 120mhz. All 32' And I could see a diff. a little beyond the diff. between the Sony & Toshiba 720p. Those two where very similar. But the 1080 looked better on some scenes of the demos they had running.

Also be careful because that Sharp 720p for $798.99 is the older model. They have a new 720p with a better contrast ratio for $999.

TV's now a days are like computers. It seems every year they are outdoing the previous model. Not with just features, but with performance. Its horrible.
I know someone that bought a 26' 720p lcd about three years ago and paid $1300. Just about any Sony, Sharp, Toshiba, Panasonic blows that TV away with performance and Price! And I;m talking 32' !!! You can get a bigger , better tv for less money.

Lastly look a that Sony 720p Is under $700 and a better tv than the Sharp. Sharp is not a bad tv, but a little overpriced imo.

Matt89
05-15-2008, 08:36 AM
Okay so (I don't know too much about HDTVs, clearly lol) but what are the most important aspects of an HDTV? (i.e. response time, contrast ratio, etc). Like, what should I look for?

But with the 32" 720p Sharp Aquos that's $999.99 (or $899.99 on BestBuy.ca, as I live in Canada), how does it compare to the 1080p one for $1199.99?

Also, what brands seem to be the best? Everyone tells me to get a Sharp, but I've heard good things about Sony, LG and Panasonic as well.

~Matt

Matt89
05-15-2008, 08:44 AM
Oh, and sorry I'm asking so many questions... :o

~Matt

KR~!
05-15-2008, 12:31 PM
well, I know someone who has a 720 big TV and just just a small 32" 1080p HDTV and what he tell me is that it isn't even close, and is very easy to tell.

baggio
05-15-2008, 04:24 PM
Okay so (I don't know too much about HDTVs, clearly lol) but what are the most important aspects of an HDTV? (i.e. response time, contrast ratio, etc). Like, what should I look for?

But with the 32" 720p Sharp Aquos that's $999.99 (or $899.99 on BestBuy.ca, as I live in Canada), how does it compare to the 1080p one for $1199.99?

Also, what brands seem to be the best? Everyone tells me to get a Sharp, but I've heard good things about Sony, LG and Panasonic as well.

~Matt

try this link for some help.

http://www.hometheatermag.com/advicefromtheexperts/0806specsmythsandlies/

But basiclly I would just trust your own eye. Take a look at the newer models, (with the better contrast ratios) if you can't see the diff. Its not worth the extra money imo.

Workshed
05-15-2008, 06:18 PM
Well, I went into Best Buy and because they have so many HDTVs on display, the HD signal was being split through all of them and thus you aren't seeing "true" HD. It's not an accurate representation of the TV's HD capabilities.

~Matt

It sounds like you still have some research to do.

Here's the link I talked about (http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-6449_7-6810011-1.html). I would look up any model you are interested in at CNET and read the editors' reviews.

There's already been some debate regarding refresh rates, etc. on the HD forums here. I found this site to be a good reference.