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bigmix007
12-17-2009, 03:15 AM
I am buying my first laser disc player always wanted one. MY question is where is a good place to buy them.

rhett
12-17-2009, 05:54 AM
There's a whole Laserdisc sub-forum with tons of people (Paff, Dave, and, uh...) that can answer that for you.

I'm guessing the answer is eBay, though...

Dave
12-17-2009, 06:00 AM
Yes ebay is your best shot. CLD-D504 or better is your best bet, or an Elite model depending on what you want to spend.

http://www.mindspring.com/~laserguru/askjosh.htm#hardware has a breakdown of some of the better models.

Paff
12-17-2009, 06:48 AM
In all seriousness, why?

10 years ago, on a small-to-medium sized standard definition TV, with a top of the line player (CLD-D704 and up), LD and DVD were pretty comparable. Plus, there were a lot of titles not out on DVD at the time.

Times have changed. Now everyone has HDTVs, usually bigger than 40". And even with a really good player, most lasers look like crud on the HDTVs. Plus, there are but a handful of titles or features that are exclusive to laser at this point.

If you want to buy titles for the cover art or the gatefolds (and a lot of lasers still do have amazing artwork), go ahead. But you're likely to be sadly disappointed when you pop it into a player and watch it.

But wait, there's more. LD players (none of which are newer than 12-13 years old) need constant play to keep them running. There's belts and gears, and they develop dry rot and the gear grease dries up if they're not used regularly. You buy a player from someone on E-bay, how long has it been sitting idle?

I'm THE biggest LD supporter on this site, and I'm really gravitating away from the format.

bigdaddyhorse
12-17-2009, 05:27 PM
I'm THE biggest LD supporter on this site, and I'm really gravitating away from the format.


It is a sad day, but you make valid points.
Esp. jumping from watching a BD or LD...:nervous:

I'm half-tempted to sell my LD player. If I can find or make a few more customs then most of my lasers will be obsolete. I still have a few with exclusive stuff, like The Howling (not all the deleted scenes are on the dvd), Tales from the Hood, Sid and Nancy, but many of the things that got into laser years back when dvd started aren't special anymore.

The best thing about my old lasers in the gatefolds, those are purty! I think I'm gonna frame Escape from New York and possible Nightmare on Elm Street. Nightmare still has some exclusive stuff, but I've already ported that to dvd (when I had XP, now my programs and devices don't work with Vista so I'm kinda stuck until I break down and buy something new to capture the video).

I think the day laser died was when The Frighteners Director's Cut was finally released on dvd. That was the holy grail, and I'm glad I bought one when they were expensive!:rolleyes:
Maybe I'll frame that too, the box is purty!:D

Dave
12-17-2009, 10:27 PM
I think if you know what you are getting into, LD can still be a fun hobby. I joined a facebook group for lasers several months ago and was surprised at all the new people picking stuff up. Most are doing it for fun and that discs can be had for dirt. Players are cheap too, though a good one will cost you a little bit. Many were playing them on bedroom TVs / old analog sets.

I could never completely dump the format and I still enjoy trying to find some of the last lasers for half decent prices (a difficult task). Someday I will invest in a high end HLD-x0 or 9. I will continue to enjoy the format for many years.

Sam
12-19-2009, 04:35 AM
A Pioneer CLD-D704 in great used shape and under $200 would be a killer setup. If that's too high a budget, I'll mirror the CLD-D504 and also add the CLD-D606. Double beware here that times have changed and newer tvs may show flaws that older analog tvs masked to some degree.

elahrairrah
12-20-2009, 06:17 AM
I am buying my first laser disc player always wanted one. MY question is where is a good place to buy them.

Ebay is the obvious place. Another place to look is Craigslist.

SaxCatz
01-10-2010, 06:24 PM
As mentioned above, EBay is the obvious choice.
Since you're located in the 'States, many can also be add at thrift or used book stores that also deal in Electronics. They probably won't seem as cheap as EBay initially, but once you factor in the shipping on a 20+ lbs LD player, you will probably be able to do just as good locally and have the advantage of being able to personally inspect the unit prior to shipping. Of course, this may be at the expense of selection.

SaxCatz
01-10-2010, 06:45 PM
Times have changed. Now everyone has HDTVs, usually bigger than 40". And even with a really good player, most lasers look like crud on the HDTVs. Plus, there are but a handful of titles or features that are exclusive to laser at this point.


This is true to some extent, but doesn't have to be.
Modern digital displays are designed to accept digital inputs from sources such as digital cable, DVD, Blu-Ray and beyond. As such, the average displays have scrapped the expensive processing and 3d adaptive comb filters necessary to extract the best performance from analog video signals.
However, high quality displays- such as the late, great Pioneer Kuros, higher end Samsung & Panasonic plasma, and many front projectors- often include these features and, if your display does not, you can always introduce an outboard video processor to your setup- of course, this can really cost you.
For instance, I have hooked up my LD player (Onkyo DX-V801- basically a Pio CLD-2090 with custom electronics) to several different displays to illustrate the differences. Connected to my 42" Philips LCD in the bedroom, the picture is horrible- not only is the PQ hampered by artifacts but the image visible "shakes" due to poor quality deinterlacing and a cheap comb filter. The image improves significantly when connected to the 63" Samsung plasma in my theater room due to the much better video processing in that more expensive display- particularly the 3d adaptive comb filter- though the PQ still seems "soft" and "blotchy compared to DVD. Lastly, connecting the LD player to my Epson PLHC 8500UB front projector with its Silicon Optix Reon HQV processing results in a sharp image with good color and very few analog or deinterlacing artifacts.
In my opinion, a medium- to high-end LD player connected to a good video processor produces an image comparable to an average DVD when fed a good LD source. Notice, I say AVERAGE DVD quality from a GOOD LD source- unfortunately, LD is still a composite, rather than component, medium with slightly less resolution than DVD so even the best LD transfer can never compare to an excellent DVD transfer.