PDA

View Full Version : What Country's Horror Films Do You Have the Hardest Time Enjoying?


rhett
01-16-2010, 06:28 PM
Sure, we like horror of all kinds, but we're also partial to genre, be it slasher or vampire, or country. More than genre, even, a country's stamp can really shape a genre, from J-Horror to Euro-Horror. What nationality brand of horror do you have the hardest time getting into?

I've included the main national stylings of horror - if you really dig Nambian horror films, sorry. At the risk of profiling, I'm going to say Korean horror, or Mexican horror, aren't different enough from their more popular counterparts (Japanese and Spanish, respectively) to warrant their own spot.

Maybe another question to ask, too, is how much does the country shape your viewing habits? Or maybe that's an entirely different thread...

dave13
01-16-2010, 08:39 PM
i gotta go with Japanese. to be fair, maybe its just because of the glut of j-horror we've received over here, so unlike french or indian horror films, i've actually had the chance to lose interest in their product. but the fact remains that i have a really hard time getting involved in any of the japanese horror films i've seen lately. the most recent one was nightmare detective, and while it was by no means bad, i just found it incredibly uninvolving. i just didn't care.

its actually kind of ironic, since classic japanese cinema by people like kurasawa, ozu, and honda, is probably one of my favorite sub-genres.

maybrick
01-16-2010, 09:22 PM
It's Mexican for me. Sorry, I know that it's not on the list and I'm not trying to be difficult, but Mexico is the first country that comes to mind. For some reason Mexican horror movies make me fall asleep every single time.

othervoice1
01-16-2010, 09:26 PM
I love japanese and really any asian horror for that matter- but I get a feeling that due to the J-horror craze it may get some backlash on this poll. But for a while there the best and most original horror flicks were asian and then redundancy seemed to kick in.

msw7
01-16-2010, 10:10 PM
German for me. They're usually just too grim.

I like horror movies that have an infusion of comedy or fantasy.

Japanese movies also have a grimness to them, but there have been enough good ones that I do enjoy that I couldn't vote for it. I can't think of one German horror movie that I really like.

Ash28M
01-16-2010, 10:37 PM
I guess I would say Japanese. They make allot of brilliant films but they're often deliberately slow paced with allot of dialog. There is nothing wrong with that, it's just takes some work on the non Japanese viewers part.

x666x
01-16-2010, 10:40 PM
I love japanese and really any asian horror for that matter- but I get a feeling that due to the J-horror craze it may get some backlash on this poll. But for a while there the best and most original horror flicks were asian and then redundancy seemed to kick in.


Backlash coming...well, not really but:

I remember watching the original Ring before the US remakes kicked it. It didn't quite freak me out like others were saying it would. In a nutshell, I find ghost story films, including the slew that came out from Asia, are too PG. I don't find them scary no matter where they are made. But that may just be because I am jaded.

Miike was the saving grace. But even he makes far more garbage than quality. He makes some great scenes of violence for films that are unnecessarily 2 hours long. I'll still have fond memories of Audition and Ichi, though.

I think this is all subjective. If you are into stuff from Japan/Asia, you have your reasons.

I'd say France as of the last 10 years makes the best shot, mature and most violent horror going on nowadays.

msw7
01-16-2010, 11:03 PM
Backlash coming...well, not really but:

I remember watching the original Ring before the US remakes kicked it. It didn't quite freak me out like others were saying it would. In a nutshell, I find ghost story films, including the slew that came out from Asia, are too PG. I don't find them scary no matter where they are made. But that may just be because I am jaded.

Miike was the saving grace. But even he makes far more garbage than quality. He makes some great scenes of violence for films that are unnecessarily 2 hours long. I'll still have fond memories of Audition and Ichi, though.

I think this is all subjective. If you are into stuff from Japan/Asia, you have your reasons.

I'd say France as of the last 10 years makes the best shot, mature and most violent horror going on nowadays.

I totally agree with most all of this. France has been top notch all decade long. Britain has put out a surprising number of good genre films too, particularly if you include horror comedies.

indiephantom
01-16-2010, 11:08 PM
It's Mexican for me. Sorry, I know that it's not on the list and I'm not trying to be difficult, but Mexico is the first country that comes to mind. For some reason Mexican horror movies make me fall asleep every single time.

I agree...similar to the Spanish cinema to me.

Haven't made it through a Bollywood horror flick yet, so that gets my vote. Also not a huge fan of Japanese stuff lately.

Darga
01-16-2010, 11:14 PM
I guess India by default- only because I haven't seen any Indian horror films that I can think of off the top of my head. What would be some good ones to start out with? I guess I should check out the Bollywood Collections from Synapse, maybe?

As for other countries, I love 'em all! There was that glut of J-horror a while back which got to be overkill, but that didn't hinder me from enjoying the good ones.

Katatonia
01-16-2010, 11:20 PM
I'm not a fan of French cinema at all. Perhaps it's hearing the actual language, which is similar to fingernails scraping a chalkboard for me.

Matt89
01-17-2010, 02:24 AM
I'm not a fan of French cinema at all. Perhaps it's hearing the actual language, which is similar to fingernails scraping a chalkboard for me.

Haha I don't mean to attack your posts about French films and the French language, but really, you think French sounds that bad? I love the French language, I just wish it was taught properly in schools in Canada. (You have to take French class from grades 1-9 in Canada - it's law, but how come by the end of grade 9 nobody can actually speak the language to save their lives? It's just not taught properly.) They teach you verb conjugations and grammar when they should just talk to you in French. I remember on most French tests, the instructions would be in English. Looking back on it, that's so bs.

But yeah, love French films. In terms of their contributions not only to the horror genre, but to cinema as a whole, they've been immense. Along with only maybe the United States and Italy, France probably has had the greatest influence on the development of the cinema out of any country. To film genre and style, to film theory and criticism, their contributions have been virtually endless.

~Matt

Harry Warden
01-17-2010, 03:00 AM
It's Mexican for me. Sorry, I know that it's not on the list and I'm not trying to be difficult, but Mexico is the first country that comes to mind. For some reason Mexican horror movies make me fall asleep every single time.

Voted Spanish. Pretty Lousy films but had Mexican been included in this poll, that would have gotten my vote. I cannot think of one Mexican horror film that I've ever liked. They do the same to me.....snooze city.

KamuiX
01-17-2010, 04:31 AM
America...easily. I'm not thinking "overall", I'm thinking in recent memory (and hopefully that's what other people are thinking, as 50s/60s Kaidan films from Japan blow away anything recent, and if you haven't watched them, you have no right to even talk about Japanese horror being "lacking"), and looking at the shit I have to wade through to find anything worthwhile coming out of the US, it's an easy choice. There's only one horror film from the past 3-4 years to come out of the US that I fell in love with (The Mist) while there's at least 2, but generally more, to come out everywhere else.

X-human
01-17-2010, 04:38 AM
I'd never thought about it before, but if given the choice I'd almost always go for another country's horror flick over anything American. Not that I specifically dislike American films, but I'm much more interested in seeing different country's take on it. Even French. Canadia I don't differentiate from American much.

But Australian movies don't really interest me. I can't put my finger on why, but they just seem off for some reason. Plus you usually still need subtitles, and even then you can't understand a word they're saying. Thankfully this discounts New Zealand. :D

maybrick
01-17-2010, 04:45 AM
Voted Spanish. Pretty Lousy films but had Mexican been included in this poll, that would have gotten my vote. I cannot think of one Mexican horror film that I've ever liked. They do the same to me.....snooze city.

I could never include Spain. I enjoy Del Toro, Ossorio, Klimovsky, and Naschy too much.

killit
01-17-2010, 05:05 AM
American crap, then overhyped Japanese crap. Thirdly Mexican crap. There is less a d less german horror films IMO mostly they are all serial killer movies

KR~!
01-17-2010, 05:16 AM
I never even heard of an Indian horror movie before, so I picked that by default. Sorry Indian horror fans.

dave13
01-17-2010, 06:30 AM
I'm not a fan of French cinema at all. Perhaps it's hearing the actual language, which is similar to fingernails scraping a chalkboard for me.

i enjoy the french language, but agree with you in regards to quebecois french. its just an ugly way to speak an otherwise beautiful language. so nasally and ungraceful.

geeare
01-17-2010, 07:28 AM
of the stuff I have seen I gotta say...Italy. I haven't seen an Indian film tho. any suggestions?

KamuiX
01-17-2010, 10:03 AM
I haven't seen an Indian film tho. any suggestions?

Purana Mandir...although be aware, since it's Bollywood, there's some singing and dancing. You can just fast-forward though, it's not a deal-breaker. Plus it adds to the surrealism of it all.

Vlachio
01-17-2010, 10:56 AM
American crap, then overhyped Japanese crap. Thirdly Mexican crap. There is less a d less german horror films IMO mostly they are all serial killer movies

I couldn't agree with you more kilt I mean killit not clit blaaaaaaaaaah you know what I meant!



Oh yeah & for me it's hands down Japanese! I love Battle Royal, The Grudge, The Ring. However when to comes to the rest zzzzZZZZZZ. :sleepy:

Katatonia
01-17-2010, 12:20 PM
Haha I don't mean to attack your posts about French films and the French language, but really, you think French sounds that bad? I love the French language, I just wish it was taught properly in schools in Canada. (You have to take French class from grades 1-9 in Canada - it's law, but how come by the end of grade 9 nobody can actually speak the language to save their lives? It's just not taught properly.) They teach you verb conjugations and grammar when they should just talk to you in French. I remember on most French tests, the instructions would be in English. Looking back on it, that's so bs.

I just don't enjoy hearing the language, period. Everyone probably finds at least one language in the world annoying, and for me it happens to be French.

Body Boy
01-17-2010, 04:41 PM
British for me. There are some GREAT films like Girly, and some of the Hammer flicks, but in general, the annoying accents drive me up the wall. While everyone was enjoying Shaun of the Dead, I was banging my head against the wall cuz of the Brit humor. It feels like the air is sucked out of life. Ever watch Coronation Street? Who would want to move to the UK after watching life unfold there? lmao XD

I'm not trying to be a douche, but...for me, I just can't get into it.

NightAndFog
01-17-2010, 04:54 PM
It saddens me to say it, but Spanish cinema is the worst piece of crap ever.Horror or otherwise.It makes me sad bcause I live in South America!
French horror films have been cool but nowadays the spark is beginning to fade.I have not seen any worthwhile title since Martyrs came out.
American horror movies r the best acted and filmed, with great pacing (unlike asian flicks) and I think even when doing remakes they got'em right.

The Chaostar
01-17-2010, 05:43 PM
Can't get into Indian films. I just can't.

x666x
01-17-2010, 07:07 PM
I'd never thought about it before, but if given the choice I'd almost always go for another country's horror flick over anything American. Not that I specifically dislike American films, but I'm much more interested in seeing different country's take on it. Even French. Canadia I don't differentiate from American much.


I'd agree with this. It is a great summary as to why I always gravitate toward Eurohorror. Part of being swept away to a different place by watching a film is helped by the film being literally shot somewhere different from what I am used to, visually.

Glad someone mentioned Mexico. I need to check out more films from there. I think the landscape will also provide a neat visual backdrop.

The French language never bothered me at all. Further, I agree with Matt89 that it is unfortunate that we are not systematically pushed to learn French more in Canada as it is our other national language.

Shannafey
01-17-2010, 09:32 PM
Japanese. There are so few Japanese films that do anything for me!!

Criswell
01-17-2010, 10:03 PM
Japanese for sure.

The J horror craze mystifies me. They all seem to be the same basic film........and all nonsensical.......almost like they make them up as they go along.

Dave
01-18-2010, 12:33 AM
Japanese for me as well. As for the two people who voted for Italian, I have since deleted their accounts from the site...

Body Boy
01-18-2010, 12:46 AM
Japanese for me as well. As for the two people who voted for Italian, I have since deleted their accounts from the site...

lol, good! :banana: :p


And I don't know what y'all mean about nonsensical Japanese horror films. >.>

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NN0HVJ5tkIM

allmessedup
01-18-2010, 02:33 AM
Japanese for sure. Just too slowly paced, and most of it just doesn't resonate for me. The first time I saw RINGU I enjoyed it, but too many of the films seem to go over the same things. From reading articles about the films it sounds like they do trigger a lot of things for people in the culture, but it doesn't mean a whole lot to me as a viewer.

I've enjoyed some of the films from the other Asian countries more, so it is definitely Japanese in particular for me that I have a hard time with.

MorallySound
01-18-2010, 09:24 PM
Japanese. At least most of the current stuff over the last 2 decades I just can't really get into it. There are a few exceptions, but overall current Japanese horror cinema just doesn't keep my attention or draws me in.

Mutilated Prey
01-19-2010, 05:47 PM
I went Japanese and Indian is a very close second. I find it just too hard to take seriously. Horror just doesn't seem to mix well for these guys. Sometimes British can be a little rough too with the heavy accents espcially if you get those older ones that are just really slow and boring overall - those are like big sleeping pills. "Ello ello - what's all this then?".

dave13
01-19-2010, 09:37 PM
I went Japanese and Indian is a very close second. I find it just too hard to take seriously. Horror just doesn't seem to mix well for these guys. Sometimes British can be a little rough too with the heavy accents espcially if you get those older ones that are just really slow and boring overall - those are like big sleeping pills. "Ello ello - what's all this then?".

:eek: thats not a dig at hammer and amicus, is it?

Mutilated Prey
01-19-2010, 09:59 PM
:eek: thats not a dig at hammer and amicus, is it?

:lol: Some I love, but there are some I just can't take. Tea and crumpets anyone?

DVD-fanatic-9
01-20-2010, 03:19 AM
FRENCH! FRENCH! FRENCH! FRENCH!

And by the way - I'm half-French and my last name screams it. I have not seen one piece of filmmaking come from that country that I could possibly defend in the slightest. And I'm including Eyes Without a Face, which almost put me to sleep. The bonus features on the DVD were more interesting than the movie. Mostly - I'm sick of their bullshit new-millennium "gritty" style and all this torture shit and the rape movies and the sexual perversion schlock. I'm starting to understand why people hate France so much, which I never understood before. I love the plots of these movies too. Everyone is kidnapped and tortured and raped and laments inner madness before Christmas before executing bloody revenges before being sexually mutilated or are expected to breed for others. It's silly how little these films' stories differ from each other. And how, despite their adult topics, boring their characters are and how juvenile the story progressions are and how predictable it all is. Throw in some college bimbos and skanky people smoking a lot... And to think as a kid, I used to think other countries were more sophisticated than America. Or, at least- as sophisticated. Have we corrupted them or have they corrupted us? I suppose it's come full circle by now, since they kinda started the trends American dipshits have been following so closely.

dave13
01-20-2010, 04:24 AM
I'm including Eyes Without a Face, which almost put me to sleep..

:eek::cry:

Ash28M
01-20-2010, 04:34 AM
FRENCH! FRENCH! FRENCH! FRENCH!

And by the way - I'm half-French and my last name screams it. I have not seen one piece of filmmaking come from that country that I could possibly defend in the slightest. And I'm including Eyes Without a Face, which almost put me to sleep. The bonus features on the DVD were more interesting than the movie. Mostly - I'm sick of their bullshit new-millennium "gritty" style and all this torture shit and the rape movies and the sexual perversion schlock. I'm starting to understand why people hate France so much, which I never understood before. I love the plots of these movies too. Everyone is kidnapped and tortured and raped and laments inner madness before Christmas before executing bloody revenges before being sexually mutilated or are expected to breed for others. It's silly how little these films' stories differ from each other. And how, despite their adult topics, boring their characters are and how juvenile the story progressions are and how predictable it all is. Throw in some college bimbos and skanky people smoking a lot... And to think as a kid, I used to think other countries were more sophisticated than America. Or, at least- as sophisticated. Have we corrupted them or have they corrupted us? I suppose it's come full circle by now, since they kinda started the trends American dipshits have been following so closely.


Sometimes I wonder if you even like horror films. You know Horror actually made a strong comeback over the last ten year. It's too bad you missed it.

snowbeast323
01-20-2010, 01:49 PM
Gonna say Japaneese, tho indian was a close second......

Myron Breck
01-20-2010, 06:27 PM
Wow. I can't believe that so many people voted for Japan--I always thought I was pretty much alone in my dislike of Asian horror! I've always hated how obsessed they are with wet children, wet hair, and....water. There must be something in their culture revolving around those because they can't seem to think about much else. Yawn.

Body Boy
01-20-2010, 07:19 PM
Wow. I can't believe that so many people voted for Japan--I always thought I was pretty much alone in my dislike of Asian horror! I've always hated how obsessed they are with wet children, wet hair, and....water. There must be something in their culture revolving around those because they can't seem to think about much else. Yawn.


Well they are surrounded by it.

http://www.japannet.de/japan/japan3.gif

DVD-fanatic-9
01-20-2010, 08:57 PM
I don't think I've ever seen a wet-ghost movie before. I'm intrigued... :D


:eek::cry:
Sorry... But, I thought it was like an overlong episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents. Is it too much to ask for them to put something eerie in the movie?

This is a thing with me and classic horror, though. Everyone has their weak spot(s). Mine is classic horror. I just don't get it. They feel more like books on film. You have to read everything. With almost no actual thrill as you watch. Only a few scenes or images giving me the slightest chill.

However, I'm also not the first person to feel those classics are a little stiff. Especially the people. Hard to relate to those goneby eras. And the conservative mannerisms of everyone (to the point of resembling corpses). Much more implied rather than said and done. Even the shocking films of the time (The Loved One) are too tame. And when it comes to horror, it feels like 2nd rate drama. I much prefer classic comedies. It's almost like they're lampooning what I find ridiculous about the serious movies that were made back then.


You know Horror actually made a strong comeback over the last ten year.
How so?


It's too bad you missed it.
God, I wish I had.


Sometimes I wonder if you even like horror films.
Ehhh, they all say that. But we're talking about a decade that thought the key to "saving" horror from the last 3 stale years of the 90's was to take out most of horror's bread and butter and taint what was left with bad conventions from the thriller and exploitation genres. Art was replaced with technology and atmosphere (again, what was left) with "grittiness." The satire in horror was wiped away by throwback films. The payoffs of dark humor were replaced with the novelty of lousy graphic death scenes (they mean nothing without proper buildup) in films like Hatchet, Mirrors, and Haute Tension- none of which I remember enjoying (actually - I did like the taxi cab victim in Carpenter's 1st season contribution to Masters of Horror). Creepiness was replaced with screeching factory sound effects. Methodical pacing was eviscerated by shaky camera and "high-voltage" (though, I yawned through all of it) action scenes that have been dubbed by so many online review outlets as "brutal" and "extreme," mostly consisting of torture and people running. What can I say? When a character runs in a horror film, the camera should stay STILL in some shots so that the sound design and music can get a shot in upping the tension. Granted there be something unique in the sound / music department that doesn't sound like every other survival "horror" film out there.

99% of the films you've been pimping from 00-09 are action-thrillers that called themselves horror. Not actually horror.

I live for horror. True horror. But that doesn't mean I'm going to embrace those new-millennium twit posers making shitty survival-horror films that feel more like Se7en, The Silence of the Lambs, Kiss the Girls, and Kalifornia (and even that was more artistic, exciting, and intelligent than the trend we're talking about here) did in the 90's. The new-millennium is 90's-lite (especially in all areas dealing with intelligence and psychology) trying to be the new 70's. Yet, each step of the way, they've been posing. And the French are the worst of the bunch.

However, Asia seems to actually have some adult filmmakers making adult themed films. Often though, the only connection they have to horror is through extreme violence. Prime example: Battle Royale. Clearly an action film, through and through. And one that sold itself as a scary horror film. At least, as far as North American word-of-mouth would have it. I give them a reprieve though because some of their films haven't forgotten what black humor really is and haven't tossed out intelligence altogether.

Body Boy
01-20-2010, 09:40 PM
I wouldn't call the 00-09 a comback either. Sure, a lot came out...a LOT...but it's like, quanitity doesn't exactly make a good horror era. Just a lot of crap, really. Though I will say, there have been some excellent flicks, like Inside and Identity to name a couple. It's not all bad, but a good comeback?...eeee. Stretching it a bit. >.>

Ash28M
01-20-2010, 10:38 PM
How so?

I wouldn't call the 00-09 a comback either. Sure, a lot came out...a LOT...but it's like, quanitity doesn't exactly make a good horror era. Just a lot of crap, really. Though I will say, there have been some excellent flicks, like Inside and Identity to name a couple. It's not all bad, but a good comeback?...eeee. Stretching it a bit. >.>

You need to take into account that a decade is ultimately judged by the cream that rises to the top. This decade may not have had many bonified classics (time may change that) but I would argue that it had more VERY GOOD horror films then maybe any other decade. Quanitity had a allot to do with it but 20 years from now no one will care about that, Not to mention other then Italy and Mexico that took a dive, foreign horror on the whole has NEVER been as strong France, Spain, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, Denmark, Japan,S. Korea, Thailand, Hong Kong and I may of missed a couple, all made significant contributions.

17thJuggalo
01-21-2010, 01:02 AM
Had to go with French because the language annoys me. I haven't seen any Indian horror movies but I find Bollywood in general fun and interesting.

Katatonia
01-21-2010, 01:39 AM
Had to go with French because the language annoys me.

:lol: Good to know I'm not the only one who feels that way.

DVD-fanatic-9
01-21-2010, 12:02 PM
You need to take into account that a decade is ultimately judged by the cream that rises to the top.
Even by that standard (the few selected best), the 90's beats 00-09. Dead Alive, Silence of the Lambs, and Scream combined beat Ginger Snaps, May, and 28 Days Later - easy. Then, with Asia considered, I think you'll have your work cut out for you finding 2 films that most people agree beat Ringu and Audition together.


This decade may not have had many bonified classics (time may change that)
Are you including 2010-2019 in that estimation? Because time can't change the quality of the films from 00-09.


but I would argue that it had more VERY GOOD horror films then maybe any other decade. Quanitity had a allot to do with it but 20 years from now no one will care about that
For that to really be true, the viewership / audiences would have to have the same attitude watching horror as they did from 03-09. I still say what I said last year- when people look back at 00-09, they're going to basically have a pile of DVD's. The movies won't mean anything, only the attitude will. The posing. Every film pretending to be the next of something that already came out a couple years or a couple months before it. Quantity has everything to do with it. That's what dictated the trends. The trends to keep pumping out crap so companies could make a few bucks off the wave and to not spend much time or effort making the movies good. To focus more on the tech trickery and less on characterization and atmosphere - things long forgotten with the rise of the Saw and remake parades. Which both begot many copycat offspring.


Oh... and I also still say: French Horror SUCKS.

Ash28M
01-21-2010, 03:30 PM
Even by that standard (the few selected best), the 90's beats 00-09. Dead Alive, Silence of the Lambs, and Scream combined beat Ginger Snaps, May, and 28 Days Later - easy. Then, with Asia considered, I think you'll have your work cut out for you finding 2 films that most people agree beat Ringu and Audition together.


Why did you choose Ginger Snaps, May, and 28 Days Later.. as your films of comparison? There very good films but there are a number of equally good or better films that have come out.

I know it's not the best test but I just did a quick search on imdb for horror films rated 7.0 or higher form the 90's and 2000's with at least 500 votes. The 2000's have had 53 and the 90's only 34 and I had to include Mini series like The Kingdom 1,2 and The Stand and Storm of the Century to even get that number. Plus I left out some obscure films from the 2000's that have never been mentioned on these forums.

And by the way Ringu and Audition feel way more like 2000 films then they go 90's films.


Are you including 2010-2019 in that estimation? Because time can't change the quality of the films from 00-09.


Obviously Classics need time to build a reputation.

aoiookami
01-21-2010, 10:46 PM
I had to go with Japanese. It used to be my favorite, I used to think the most fresh stuff came from there, and some of my fav's still are, but reccently the last several j-horror titles I've seen have all been loosely based on the 'spend the whole movie uncovering the secret of the ghost/haunting/spirit' plotline much like The Ring. Even new(ish) titles that people have been raving about like Noroi borrow that plotline, its getting stale.

CesspoolOfSkull
01-22-2010, 02:44 AM
I had to go with Indian, I pretty much can't stand any of those films people called "Bollywood" movies, I've seen a few of the horror movies and thought the acting was so shitty and the production was so poor (even for new releases) and I usually only like B-horror movies. When somebody shows me something good that comes from India I'll change my mind, maybe, but I've found nothing yet. I guess it's got alot to do with bad stories too, nothing seems original enough coming from their horror movies.

shithead
01-22-2010, 04:20 AM
I've never seen an Indian Horror Film...that I know of.

So i'll go with that.

DVD-fanatic-9
01-22-2010, 12:57 PM
Why did you choose Ginger Snaps, May, and 28 Days Later.. as your films of comparison? There very good films but there are a number of equally good or better films that have come out.
Such as?

I did notice after the fact that each one of those were my picks in the "Best American/Canadian/British Horror Film" threads. But neither had much competition. That's why I 'chose' those. They chose me.


I know it's not the best test but I just did a quick search on imdb for horror films rated 7.0 or higher form the 90's and 2000's with at least 500 votes. The 2000's have had 53 and the 90's only 34 and I had to include Mini series like The Kingdom 1,2 and The Stand and Storm of the Century to even get that number. Plus I left out some obscure films from the 2000's that have never been mentioned on these forums.
I had a discussion with someone last summer about how IMDb represents the horror community and even he, a much greater supporter of remakes and 00-09 in horror, said that place can't be trusted as a source for realistic majority opinion. When you break down who-votes, there is a much greater base of male voters and white voters (don't ask me how they know the gender and race of the voters, but sources who've criticized IMDb claim they know) than women and people of other races. Not to mention, this rules out a large economic base- of people who can't afford computers but very well might have seen the movies, one way or another. Or people who wouldn't vote on IMDb anyway; people with active social lives, for example, who go out more often than stay in (let's face it: though computers aren't for dorks anymore, most average people still don't blog, chat, message board, etc. as often as we might). When you consider that, I don't see how your argument really works.


And by the way Ringu and Audition feel way more like 2000 films then they go 90's films.
I won't argue with you there. However... they were made in the 90's and just because the DVD's weren't released until the new millennium doesn't change that.


Obviously Classics need time to build a reputation.
Since when? A decade has passed, but I think we both know The Blair Witch Project was seen as a classic from the moment the hype hit the mainstream. Almost 14 years now, and the same is true for Scream. I would say 28 Days Later is a classic too, but what's happened to that film as well as the entire genre from 03-the present is that the haze and sea of hype has taken over assessment of "classics" and there are no more classics. Not by the standard that would've had them be classic. There are only favorites. And newer films, that only due to financial success, have had an influence on the genre.

Ash28M
01-22-2010, 03:32 PM
Since when? A decade has passed, but I think we both know The Blair Witch Project was seen as a classic from the moment the hype hit the mainstream. Almost 14 years now, and the same is true for Scream. I would say 28 Days Later is a classic too, but what's happened to that film as well as the entire genre from 03-the present is that the haze and sea of hype has taken over assessment of "classics" and there are no more classics. Not by the standard that would've had them be classic. There are only favorites. And newer films, that only due to financial success, have had an influence on the genre.

There are tons of example of films that were extremely popular when they came out but faded away over time or the other way around. How often is the Sixth Sense talked about on these boards now? Blair Witch is a classic because it still talked about and debated 10 years later. I don't think anyone would argue The Thing is a classic yet it did Terrible at the box office and with Critics. I wouldn't proclaim 28 Days Later.. a classic just yet but i admit it has the potential. Some films start strong and get even more popular over time i.e Audition, Haute Tension, The Descent, The Devil's Reject and some start off strong and slowly fade into the background i.e The Ringu (and maybe the Ring as well), Dark Water, The Devil's Backbone, Jeepers Creepers, Final Destination. These films don't get very many votes anymore on any Best of Lists on here. Here are some more example of films this decade that started off sort of slow but get bigger ever year. May, Session 9, American Psycho, A Tale of Two Sisters, Frailty.

Body Boy
01-22-2010, 06:53 PM
I especially see American Psycho getting praise with each passing year. I wasn't a fan when I watched it in 2005, but maybe I'll revisit, as it usually tops the best of the 2000s list. American Psycho is kind of like the 80s' Maniac, in a way...(*cough* 'cept not as good *cough*)

DVD-fanatic-9
01-23-2010, 06:41 PM
:lol:

Maniac is shit dipped in more shit. Just because Bateman picked up hookers does not put American Psycho in the same league.


There are tons of example of films that were extremely popular when they came out but faded away over time or the other way around. How often is the Sixth Sense talked about on these boards now?
I get you, but I think the reason is simple: the whole thing is nothing but a lead-up to the twist ending (or "flip" as the writer of Frailty says there are two kinds of "reality-altering" endings and a difference between them). Once you know the ending, what's left to say? I liked it or I didn't. It scared me or it didn't. That's it.


Blair Witch is a classic because it still talked about and debated 10 years later. I don't think anyone would argue The Thing is a classic yet it did Terrible at the box office and with Critics. I wouldn't proclaim 28 Days Later.. a classic just yet but i admit it has the potential. Some films start strong and get even more popular over time i.e Audition, Haute Tension, The Descent, The Devil's Reject and some start off strong and slowly fade into the background i.e The Ringu (and maybe the Ring as well), Dark Water, The Devil's Backbone, Jeepers Creepers, Final Destination. These films don't get very many votes anymore on any Best of Lists on here. Here are some more example of films this decade that started off sort of slow but get bigger ever year. May, Session 9, American Psycho, A Tale of Two Sisters, Frailty.
You can't compare the decades prior to 00-09 and the films to come out in that decade. There's a difference between a film getting more attention and one having had a substantial following for over a decade. The Thing has proved it stands the test of time and people loved it before action trends took over the horror genre. The 00's are desperately reliant on trends. And I also find debates of the 00 films are comprised of very little arguing of substance and instead, much more arguing on effect.

Body Boy
01-23-2010, 07:23 PM
:lol:

Maniac is shit dipped in more shit. Just because Bateman picked up hookers does not put American Psycho in the same league.


:fuck: Maniac > American Psycho

!!!

lol, :D

DVD-fanatic-9
01-23-2010, 07:32 PM
:fuck: Maniac > American Psycho

!!!

lol, :D
Maniac = rip-off of Deranged (only set in New York City) with Eyes of Laura Mars added as dressing. :evil:

SaxCatz
01-30-2010, 03:35 AM
as for the two people who voted for italian, i have since deleted their accounts from the site...
kudos! :D

SaxCatz
01-30-2010, 03:41 AM
lol, good! :banana: :p


And I don't know what y'all mean about nonsensical Japanese horror films. >.>

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NN0HVJ5tkIM

That trailer was a bad acid trip and a half.
For me though, I have to give the nod to Indian. Although Bollywood is capable of producing some solid films, I don't feel that their general "style" is very conducive to the horror genre.
That being said, despite my love for J-Horror of years past, the last few years crops of J-Horror (and their half-assed American remakes) have really left me exasperated.

LLL
02-01-2010, 01:19 PM
American. Old Hollywood movies are fantastic, but it's really gone down the crapper since.

Ash28M
02-01-2010, 03:45 PM
Why are so many people choosing Indian. How many Indian Horror films have you actually seen? I think I've only seen Bandh Darwaza from the Bollywood horror collection and it was pretty entertaining. Even though it used the score from Friday the 13th throughout and was 3 hours long.

Richard Anthony
02-03-2010, 05:03 PM
Japanese for me. I don't know what it is but it is hard for me to get into them. I can only say that a few have had an impact on me but not many.

Dobby
02-10-2010, 09:24 AM
Indian for me the language cracks me up.