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View Poll Results: Rate/Comment On Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)
10 6 21.43%
9.5 4 14.29%
9 6 21.43%
8.5 2 7.14%
8 4 14.29%
7.5 2 7.14%
7 0 0%
6.5 0 0%
6 2 7.14%
5.5 0 0%
5 2 7.14%
4.5 0 0%
4 0 0%
3.5 0 0%
3 0 0%
2.5 0 0%
2 0 0%
1.5 0 0%
1 0 0%
Voters: 28. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-11-2004, 12:41 PM   #1
Ash28M
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Rate/Comment On Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)

IMO the best of the 50's Sci-Fi/Horror films, Don Siegel's Invasion of the Body Snatchers
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Old 10-11-2004, 01:56 PM   #2
Morg
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I gave it a 7.5. Great atmosphere, good movie. But I prefer Kaufman's 1978 version.
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Old 10-11-2004, 03:16 PM   #3
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I give it a 5/10. It is ok, but it really doesn't do much for me one way or the other,
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Old 10-11-2004, 04:38 PM   #4
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6 all the way
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Old 10-11-2004, 05:14 PM   #5
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I love this movie, can't say why. The 78 version was an improvement, true, but this is the original. The paranoia of having your body taken over against your will--a great idea that has been duplicated many times since.
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Old 10-11-2004, 06:27 PM   #6
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I gave this one a 10 , a true Sci-fi classic . The remake was even better , which is rare having a remake better than the original .
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Old 10-11-2004, 08:32 PM   #7
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Gave it an 8. The original is a great movie. I found the 78 remake very boring, uninteresting and not quite as focused as the original. The remake I'd give maybe a 6.5.
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Old 10-13-2004, 02:54 PM   #8
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I really love this movie. It's one of my favorite movies of all time. Like one of the other posters, I'm not entirely sure why. But I think it involves me imagining myself in that situation. In many ways, having things just slightly wrong is creepier than having a monster attack you outright. In this case, the protagonist has to wonder if he is going insane or if this is really happening. Just a great idea for a film, and I thought it was executed very well.
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Old 10-15-2004, 11:34 AM   #9
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9 Great sci-fi film.This and The Day the Earth Stood Still are my favorites in the sci -fi genre.
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Old 10-15-2004, 02:00 PM   #10
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9. Wonderful period piece. This has been remade two times, with diminishing returns. Many prefer the Sutherland take, but I find that one overly long. This is the best of the bunch. Nice DVD too.
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Old 10-21-2004, 11:27 AM   #11
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Don Siegel is an interesting, underated director and I think I know why.
When you look at his output, it's very ecclectic. He made movies in
a variety of genres and styles. "Dirty Harry" was an entertaining reaction to the counter-culture movies that dominated the industry in the early seventies. "The Beguiled" was a gothic thriller. "Two Mules for Sister Sarah" was an American style Spaghetti Western. "The Line Up" was a daylight film noir. And of course, "Invasion of the Body Snatchers", a quintessential fifties' sci fi film. A great deal of diversity
and styles in each project and that's the problem. The critics didn't know what to make of him. Most critics prefer to rate directors within the 'auteur' context, namely, filmmakers that use the same style and explore the same themes in all of their work like Hitchcock or Scorsese.
Basically, directors who do variations on a theme. But what can you say about a talented director who doesn't do that? Makes a different type of picture in a unique style over the course of twenty years?
There are a number of directors like Siegel and others (i.e. Victor Fleming) who had a distinct but inconsistent style that are ignored by the critics and historians which is a pity.

As to the film itself, it's meaning has been discussed in a variety of ways. Since the fifties was the height of the Cold War, some historians think that the 'pod people' who took over your body and made you an emotionless (or souless) part of a collective was a reference to communism. Siegel used to joke that the pods were his producers who re-cut his movie and put in the stupid framing devise with Richard Deacon.

There is some confusion about whether "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" was a widescreen movie. The answer is...it was and
it wasn't.

It was photographed in full frame 1.33 (square) like all pre-1950's films.
However, for theatrical release prints the cropped the top and bottom of the film and made it into a scope release. So if you see the scope version you're seeing less than was photographed on the top and bottom of the frame. The TV version was a print made from the full frame negative. It was not pan and scanned from the artifically made scope version as some people think and as Criterian suggested in their old laserdisc release. "Superscope" was designed to be able to play either format (for both TV and theaters that were not yet set up to show widescreen movies) but the cinematographer had to compromise the compositions so that they were acceptable both ways.
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Old 10-21-2004, 08:18 PM   #12
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Saw this film in a Propaganda and the Psychology of Persuasion class during my senior year of college. Been a huge fan of it ever since.
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Old 10-22-2004, 12:18 AM   #13
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I certainly wouldn't classify this film within that context. It's been interpreted that way but it was designed to entertainment like most
movies made prior to the late sixties. That's what makes an interesting
movie for me. Open to multiple interpretations and the political content (if any) is not overt and obvious.
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Old 10-25-2004, 02:58 PM   #14
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Perfect Sci-Fi, political allegory.

10 out of 10 all the way.......
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Old 10-27-2004, 05:50 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardHaines
Don Siegel is an interesting, underated director and I think I know why.
When you look at his output, it's very ecclectic. He made movies in
a variety of genres and styles. "Dirty Harry" was an entertaining reaction to the counter-culture movies that dominated the industry in the early seventies. "The Beguiled" was a gothic thriller. "Two Mules for Sister Sarah" was an American style Spaghetti Western. "The Line Up" was a daylight film noir. And of course, "Invasion of the Body Snatchers", a quintessential fifties' sci fi film. A great deal of diversity
and styles in each project and that's the problem. The critics didn't know what to make of him. Most critics prefer to rate directors within the 'auteur' context, namely, filmmakers that use the same style and explore the same themes in all of their work like Hitchcock or Scorsese.
Basically, directors who do variations on a theme. But what can you say about a talented director who doesn't do that? Makes a different type of picture in a unique style over the course of twenty years?
There are a number of directors like Siegel and others (i.e. Victor Fleming) who had a distinct but inconsistent style that are ignored by the critics and historians which is a pity.
Perfectly put. I'm a big Siegel fan because he is such a great and economical craftsman. He knows how to build the tension simply and effectively and his ability in different genres is proof of that. And the films you mention, although his best, were not flukes. Movies like "Telefon", "Coogan's Bluff", "Escape From Alcatraz", "The Killers" all demonstrate his skill.

As for ITBS I think this is one of the greatest horror films because the central metaphor has so many meanings and because Siegel is so persuasive in presenting the story.

I give it a 10.
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