Horror Digital Forum  

Go Back   Horror Digital Forum > All Things Horror > General > Reader Reviews

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-29-2012, 12:55 PM   #1
DVD-fanatic-9
Remaking My Soul
 
DVD-fanatic-9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Horror
Posts: 3,266
Disney Animated Classics Marathon (Currently Updating)

JUST SO NOBODY FREAKS: I will not be bumping this with a new reply every single time I watch another movie. That would be a clear example of post-whoring. I'll edit this post with each new movie and only post again if there are any responses. (Or if I hit the maximum character limit.)

Anyway, about 4 years ago, I tried a late September Disney marathon to get me in the mood for October's horror festivities. Especially since I just watched that Stephen King documentary last night and he said the first film that scared him was a Disney film. It's kind of perfect. I think we can all agree Disney has had an amazing influence on the world of horror, and vice versa.

I've chosen to start at my cut-off point (the very last film) and move backward - only...sort of: I'm going to do this decade-by-decade in reverse (I wish I had any time left for the shorts because there's a TON of stuff I'd love to watch for the holiday... I'll try to make you guys a list of Halloween and horror themed shorts because Disney has quite a ton and they're all worth checking out) - with...



The Fox and the Hound (1981) -

Okay, so, considering this is regarded as one of the most intelligent, courageous, depth-and-heart filled Disney films (animated OR live-action), how do I say I think it's terrible without being lynched... I have a ton of problems with this movie. But they all fit into categories (as they usually do). For one, the movie is trying to be cute with the animals and most of the time, I think they achieved the exact opposite. Todd, Vixey, Big Mama, Chief, Dinky, and Boomer could be torn viciously limb-from-limb by that evil bear and I wouldn't bat an eye. However, mini-Copper is so freaking adorable... as are the little baby chicks and, I thought the worm was cute. Two, the hunting problem. How in the flying fuck are we meant to care about Copper after he helps murder all those innocent animals? He even has an attitude about it, calling them "varmants" (cut to the - by comparison - unfairly maligned Pocahontas's "Savages"). I get the movie's message of "we're taught to" do this bad thing, so we become the bad thing. But, the movie's also trying to argue that this is nature. In nature: there is no message, shit just happens. Like- birds not getting the idea to fly south for the winter until the movie wrings another "wacky" scene of them failing to catch the worm. (Again, why bash Pocahontas for not getting facts right; when has Disney ever not just done whatever they felt like?) This movie doesn't follow nature nor, do I think, it follows its' own message. Especially since the stakes dictating Copper will try to kill Todd are set by Chief the dog being near fatally injured... only to reveal he just hurt his leg a little. They compound upon this by making quirky jokes about it ("get back there, Chief, or I'll break your other leg," "he sure is makin' an awful fuss over a little ol' hurt leg"). This movie doesn't just show us hunting, it uses the deaths of these animals as a bonding experience. As a way to... make us care about the hunting party. All 3 characters. This is where I have to say: anyone remember Bambi? This goes against everything that film stood for. Were the animating team here trying to say that film got it wrong? No, I'll tell you what they were saying: Let's Breed. The romance between Todd and Vixey is meant to be the film's weapon against... its own smiling portrayal of the slaughter of innocents. More like: "let's make more babies" just so the hunters have animals to kill. Aye yai yai! Anyway, the film does manage to score a few good dramatic moments (the mother fox's struggle to save the baby, the "let's go home" ending, the scenes of the weather changing, and the Widow saying goodbye to Todd) and the animation really is excellent.

Oh, yeah... this also has Disney's worst song. Ever (prepare for pain): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYEWabQoloM

Last edited by DVD-fanatic-9; 11-05-2012 at 01:42 AM.
DVD-fanatic-9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2012, 02:55 PM   #2
X-human
I ate my keys
 
X-human's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6,861
Just last weekend I was laying off an old VHS tape of Disney's Halloween Treat which included Disney's Greatest Villians. I'm also making a digital copy of my "Scary Tales Vol. 1" VHS sometime soon. Disney was very good at making spooky stuff in the early days and I'd be very interested to hear any highlights you may know.

I'll be screening both specials during my Halloween party. It should go over well as I have a bunch of Disney freaks for friends.
__________________
The combined weight of the horrors I have authored wrought would crush your carbon hearts into perfect diamonds of terror!

A Few Ants Short. And what the hell, check out my DVD Collection won't you?
X-human is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2012, 03:27 PM   #3
Marshall Crist
Stalker
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by DVD-fanatic-9 View Post
The Fox and the Hound (1981) -

Okay, so, considering this is regarded as one of the most intelligent, courageous, depth-and-heart filled Disney films (animated OR live-action)
Granted, I don't get out much, but I have never heard anything particularly positive said about this film.
Marshall Crist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2012, 05:09 PM   #4
CPT HOOK
HackMaster
 
CPT HOOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: US
Posts: 3,543
This reminds me, I need to watch Disney's Legend Of Sleepy Hollow cartoon this year. I haven't seen it since I was a kid.
CPT HOOK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2012, 09:15 PM   #5
DVD-fanatic-9
Remaking My Soul
 
DVD-fanatic-9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Horror
Posts: 3,266


The Aristocats (1970) -

My experience with this one is different every time. On this particular occasion, I enjoyed it more than I usually do. This especially marks the period where Disney's animation really starts looking cheap. And yet, they really make up for it with editing, some really ambitious camera pans (for a post-Dalmatians film), music, and one or two really knockout scenes. The characters are the great flaw here. And this is probably why the technical aspects stand out so much- to cover the fact that without them, you won't care about what happens to Dutchess and the kittens. The more memorable characters go along with the movie's best scenes. A pair of dogs who act as a kind of Robin Hoodish gang steal the show in my opinion. And, right after that as though the movie needed another upper, the smash-bang "Ev'rybody Wants to Be a Cat" musical number. From then on, the movie rides high as shots (villain Edgar falling from bonded shoelaces used as tension for will Roquefort make it in time to warn the cats or not) and gags (the "QUIET!!!" moment as Roquefort tries to make out the lock combination) get smarter. Though, it's just a little too late to erase the slower first half. Which only really works if you're as outraged as Edgar that these cats will inherit millions of dollars they can't use. Otherwise, it's really just a poor 101 Dalmatians rip-off with some really bad ideas they keep recycling. Especially Marie being constantly in peril and Tolouse's tough alleycat intimidation technique.




Robin Hood (1973) -

It's still one of my favorite Disney movies, just not in the top 5 anymore. Some of the Aristocats problems are fixed, namely speeding up the opening 20 minute chunk (which is wonderful) and removing the damsel-in-distress angle entirely. I would also sling this movie some points for multiplying the villain into 3 main baddies. Sir Hiss being the sneaky one, Prince John being the campy one (I love the thumb-sucking gag), and the Sheriff being the threatening one. Some people are bothered that Prince John is such a flamer but the Sheriff more than makes up for what the Prince should really be- deceptively aggressive and slimely charming. Creepy little eyes too. Robin Hood also has some good humor (though nowhere near as gut-busting as Hook and Smee in Peter Pan) and top notch action. However, the middle section of the movie hits a serious boring patch; starting with its' decision to try to make the group of bunny kids into main characters. For about 5 minutes. And, are they any less annoying than the kittens in Aristocats? No. Not really. The music is also weaker by a large margin.




The Rescuers (1977) -

Most underrated Disney animated film ever. Penny, as a character, is a little bratty (and I'm including the rough scene where we're introduced to her) and the first 15 minutes are a little slow. But, after that, the film is almost perfect. Every single aspect of it. The Shelby Flint songs are glorious (sappy though they are), the animation is some of the best since 101 Dalmatians, colors are electric, the editing is tense, the mood is stark and atmospheric, it's emotional and smart, I almost cried, and there's a point to it. If you forget the stuff Penny has to swallow. The animators might be trying to turn Medusa into Cruella the 2nd but Medusa in my opinion is more funny. And creepier. And... wow: characters! This is true of many of Disney's movies even when they started but, Disney really do usually turn out a very cold final product when it comes to characters. Most of them are hollow on the inside. Not these ones. Even the villains come off a little more... not complex or warm, but they have more of a relationship. And it makes sense. People are insane for writing this one off like so many have. It's, without a doubt in my mind, one of Disney's Top 10 finest animated features.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Marshall Crist View Post
Granted, I don't get out much, but I have never heard anything particularly positive said about this film.
It wasn't successful at the box office but it's always been a critical darling and the general public was on the fence but they've begun leaning toward it being an underrated classic a lot more since it was first released on DVD.


Quote:
Originally Posted by X-human View Post
Just last weekend I was laying off an old VHS tape of Disney's Halloween Treat which included Disney's Greatest Villians. I'm also making a digital copy of my "Scary Tales Vol. 1" VHS sometime soon. Disney was very good at making spooky stuff in the early days and I'd be very interested to hear any highlights you may know.
Disney's not always so generous as to put all their great spooky classics in one place. But, thanks to YouTube, most of the pieces are right there. Here's a few to start:

The Skeleton Dance - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9tlByl7N6I
Hell's Bells - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mXSNg3MeaA
The Haunted House - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNuq5v7INeo
Egyptian Melodies - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9gPdWwTMX0
The Spider and the Fly - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndL_qEIqZ60
Babes in the Woods - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KNI9UwN-KY
The Mad Doctor - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-JlevnccDk
The Three Little Pigs - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leAh00n3hno
The Big Bad Wolf - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnO5RROwNw8
The Flying Mouse - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIwx0dEIcM8
The Goddess of Spring - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKMqySX9AUc
Three Little Wolves - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R38yK8JUY7k
The Worm Turns - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0yUznKWK9VY

The Great Cat Family - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AQlM2orunQ
DVD-fanatic-9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2012, 06:17 AM   #6
dave13
HackMaster
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,861
Quote:
Originally Posted by DVD-fanatic-9 View Post
Oh, yeah... this also has Disney's worst song. Ever (prepare for pain): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYEWabQoloM
i dunno...does that even qualify as a song? its more like some dialogue that happens to rhyme. i can take disney or leave it. my wife loves some of it, so i only really know the ones that she likes (little mermaid, beauty and the beast, lion king) - they're all fairly charming, and i'd be lying if i said i wasn't excited about introducing my daughter to these movies sometime in the next few years. movies like fox and the hound, i haven't seen in decades. i know i've seen then, but have very, very little memory of them.
dave13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2012, 11:55 AM   #7
DVD-fanatic-9
Remaking My Soul
 
DVD-fanatic-9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Horror
Posts: 3,266


The Jungle Book (1967) -

Obviously, there are a lot of characters people remember from The Jungle Book. But, I'm not completely sure this is that solid a film in terms of writing characters. Animating them, sure. And, I'm not arguing consistency. What I want from a movie about characters in the jungle is a really good reason for why a human can't make it there. Maybe a better reason than- the kid's a dumbass. And Mowgli's sole redeeming quality is that he wants to be brave. This is what gets Baloo and Bagheera in all the trouble they get into. In other words: Mowgli really is a dumbass. A character I don't think has any redeeming quality. He's more of a tool to unite the real team of the movie, Baloo and Bagheera. His naive innocence. But, give it credit: in a film where every single character who meets Mowgli either looks at him with chops licking or puts their hands / noses all over him before he even looks them in the eye, it sounds quite progressive to hear Baloo say "come to think of it, no panther ever asked me" in response to Bagheera's "you wouldn't marry a panther, would you?" Anyway, most of the characters are entertaining dopes but the film flows so smoothly that I can't think of anything that doesn't work. I was really preparing myself to spend all this text on how much Mowgli hurts the movie. Great music, too. Also, who's idea was it to make Winnie the Pooh a devious killer snake? Genius.




101 Dalmatians (1961) -

Since getting the 2008 DVD, I've come to regard this as without question one of the most attractive, eye-popping, best animated films Disney ever made. This is definitely a triumph of style. Which is good, since it's about the dogs and... I don't care about what happens to a single one of them. As a matter of fact, were these dogs real (and looked like cartoons, of course, ala- Who Framed Roger Rabbit), I would have "popped off" and skinned Rolly personally. "I'm hungry," "I'm hungry," "I'm hungry," "I'm hungry," "I'm hungry." No, you little shit- you're fat. Which Hollywood thinks means = you're hungry ALL THE TIME. There's even a scene where a collie has to force the parents, Pongo and Perdita(?), to eat because they still have so much traveling to do but really want to go to sleep instead. Meanwhile, who's there at their feet except little "I'm Hungry"... I mean, Rolly. Going: "I'm hungry." Even though he literally JUST ate 2 of Horace's sandwiches. Must... Kill... Rolly. Some of the other puppies get genuinely noble characteristics but this one gets the bulk of everything. He even gets to be a giant moron as well. He screams and gives the puppies' hiding spot away in the house, he almost slides out on the ice and gives another hiding spot away, and is the only dog to fail at soot-rolling (despite his name). The human characters on the other hand are extremely sophisticated by comparison and, so, because of them you do sort of want the dogs to come home safely. The rest of the film is very effective action and adventure (both of which work very well) and there's only one real song in the movie- try forgetting that one. Cruella, while being one of Disney's most infamous villains, is in my opinion a little overrated. Though she does come with some fun accessories (her phone is TERRIFYING!). We get to spend a little more time with Horace and Jasper. They likely would have been fun, but like Cruella we have to get to know their living environment too. This means we watch TV. And now I really want to know what Mr. Fauncewater's crime was...




The Sword in the Stone (1963) -

Walt Peregoy strikes again. All of Disney's most unique and striking films seem to have one mastermind behind the canvas (Sleeping Beauty- Eyvind Earle, Bambi- Tyrus Wong, Once Upon a Wintertime- Mary Blair). The guy responsible for the downright radical look of Dalmatians and Sword is Peregoy, and he just plain rules. Meanwhile, the film has not been embraced like Disney's other films from 1950 to 1968. I think I know why- it's because in the 49 years since it was released, everyone knows someone who watched a classic Disney educational special. Which of course rooted themselves somewhere in the 1940's or 50's; the most famous being either Jiminy Cricket's I'm No Fool series or, I'm guessing (because the name is so unforgettable), Donald in Mathmagic Land. Sword in the Stone feels like an educational special. And it might as well be. I have absolutely no problem with that, since there are a lot of shorts in which you can't exactly tell whether Disney want to educate you or just make you laugh. There are some hardcore belly laughs to be had here. The "black magic" kitchen scene especially is one of the funniest scenes I've ever seen in a Disney film. And, right after Captain Hook, Madam Mim is one of Disney's funniest villains. And most underrated. And, if I don't mention the Wizards' Duel scene, I know I'll be karmatically flogged. It's still amazing all these years later. Whether the film feels like a series of shorts strung together or not, it's a very entertaining film. Entirely guilt-free. And the characters are all a lot of fun.




The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (1966, '68, '74, & '77) -

Another episodic Disney feature... only this time, of course, that's because it's made up of 4 separate parts. Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree is the introduction to Pooh having a child's sense of reasoning- "there must be somebody there because somebody must have said 'Nobody'." In this short, Pooh is the cutest character because he's more than a little selfish (his trip to Rabbit's Howse to eat all his honey and leave a huge mess) and mean spirited (spitting the bees out of his mouth like a machine gun and kicking them on the way down). My favorite character though is Gopher (his part here is endlessly quotable) and him and Rabbit have one of my all-time favorite Disney moments (Don't Feed the Bear!). The second short, Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day is a masterpiece. Every single scene is a winner (although I don't love "The Rain Rain Rain..." song). The camerawork in the scene in Owl's Howse is amazing (anyone ever notice just how much it's really moving around?). The "Heffalumps and Woozles" sequence is obviously another attempt to recreate "Pink Elephants on Parade" but it very much has its' own great-ness; it's quirky and genuinely creepy. The cutest and, of course - undeniably, the best character in the short is Tigger. His bit part during Pooh's scary night alone scene is one of the most adorable things I've ever seen in my life. Funniest character is Eeyore ("thanks for noticing me," "cosy cottage, nice location; bit damp for Owl, though"). The third short, Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too is clearly the least strong of the main 3. For reusing animation, sound bits, etc from the earlier shorts. However, it has its' own great charms. For one- Rabbit, against expectation, becomes the best character here. Even getting a true dramatic arc. It's a very moody short, the scene where Rabbit gets lost creeped me out like I can't describe when I was a kid, and it has a top-notch ending. Not only do we have another adorable Tigger moment (when he turns back after Rabbit sort of expels him from the group because he won't stop bouncing), but the snow creates a beautiful atmosphere of sereneness and Tigger's "everybody bounce" really winds up being an excellent moment of empowerment. For everyone. Would Rabbit have been so miserable for so many years if he had known before about the joy of bouncing?



Quote:
Originally Posted by dave13 View Post
i dunno...does that even qualify as a song? its more like some dialogue that happens to rhyme.
I believe it's not available on any CD or compilation. But, if it were, they would probably have re-did it (like they did with Tigger's theme and "Heffalumps and Woozles"- why the fuck they did that, I'll never know). Expanded it and actually put in some music rather than whatever they were doing to that poor fiddle.

Last edited by DVD-fanatic-9; 10-01-2012 at 05:48 AM.
DVD-fanatic-9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2012, 04:35 PM   #8
X-human
I ate my keys
 
X-human's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6,861


I made a digital copy of Scary Tales last night and it was a real trip to see all these again. This includes both The Skeleton Dance and The Haunted House which were absolute favorites as a kid and still are today.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DVD-fanatic-9 View Post
Disney's not always so generous as to put all their great spooky classics in one place. But, thanks to YouTube, most of the pieces are right there. Here's a few to start:

The Skeleton Dance - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9tlByl7N6I
Hell's Bells - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mXSNg3MeaA
The Haunted House - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNuq5v7INeo
Egyptian Melodies - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9gPdWwTMX0
The Spider and the Fly - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndL_qEIqZ60
Babes in the Woods - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KNI9UwN-KY
The Mad Doctor - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-JlevnccDk
The Three Little Pigs - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leAh00n3hno
The Big Bad Wolf - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnO5RROwNw8
The Flying Mouse - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIwx0dEIcM8
The Goddess of Spring - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKMqySX9AUc
Three Little Wolves - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R38yK8JUY7k
The Worm Turns - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0yUznKWK9VY

The Great Cat Family - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AQlM2orunQ
Awesome, thanks. I'll start checking these out. Some I've seen but most I haven't. Hell's Bells was awesome.
__________________
The combined weight of the horrors I have authored wrought would crush your carbon hearts into perfect diamonds of terror!

A Few Ants Short. And what the hell, check out my DVD Collection won't you?
X-human is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2012, 05:43 PM   #9
DVD-fanatic-9
Remaking My Soul
 
DVD-fanatic-9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Horror
Posts: 3,266
Here's a couple more spooky specials kicking around YouTube:

A replay of DHT hosted by Jonathan Winters (1 of about 6 parts)
(the quality's a little shaky, but he's a lot of fun here) - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hO13S3WOsA
The entire Dtv's Monster Hits special in one vid - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGV0Khe9Mjg
Walt Disney's All About Magic special - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndKLWZb8Lw0



Cinderella (1950) -

This one was an interesting re-watch. Doing this marathon decade-by-decade backward becomes a real shock to the system when you get to this movie. All in all, I would have to categorize the Disney animated films of the 60's and 70's as a block as being a great deal more intelligent and sober than this extremely lightweight film. Even among Disney fans- the Princess films are scrutinized if they feel the lead heroine comes up short. But there's not really much to this Cinderella. She's absurdly kind and pushovery. Every now and then you see a hint of brassiness (thanks to Lucifer's incessant prodding). Then the mice come in and take over the movie. This is where the film's reputation among fans gets interesting. They love Cinderella for the same reasons Thatguywiththelgasses.com's Nostalgia Chick has criticized her. For being, as she sees her, a "Good Christian" archetype who takes everything heaped upon her like a bitch in the idea that she'll be rewarded for her patience and inner strength. But, then the mice come in and the fans don't exactly "love" them. However, without the mice, the film wouldn't have its' most compelling quality. And that is... are you ready for this... Cinderella is at its' heart a suspense film. Somewhat inspired by Hitchcock and other Staircase Thrillers. Watch it for yourself, it's unbelievably thorough about its' abundant race-against-time sequences. The mice have very goofy personalities but their battles against Lucifer the cat are surprisingly meaty (and funny) chase sequences. Lastly, on the con side... the film's Prince. Until the day I die, I'm going to say the Prince Charming of Disney's Cinderella is gay. Why else is the father relegated to desperate, frustrated, RAGE-filled matchmaker who blows a gasket on this telling bit of dialogue: "if all the eligible maidens in my kingdom just happen to be there, why, he's bound to show interest in one of them... ISN'T HE???!!!" Every element is in-place: he's old enough to have been married already, leaves home for a period of time long enough to make the King lonely, and is described by his father as "incurable," "silly," and as having wild "romantic ideas." The film's answer is one for the ignorant ages: he just hasn't met the right woman yet. They make him gay and then they turn him. Because Disney thought being gay was fixable. Anyway, that's my interpretation. Is there anything really in this movie to debunk it?




Alice in Wonderland (1951) -

Considering how many things related to Disney I've passionately enjoyed throughout my lifetime, I should probably have a concrete opinion on Walt Disney as a man. I don't. One school of person believes he was this great child at heart and that combined with his dedication to art as true art rather than just business made him a wonderful person, inside and out. However, he was also a very old-fashioned guy who lived in both very racist and rigid, conformist times. Was he a bigot or an elitist? I don't know. But, he was very sensitive when it came to the kinds of films his studio made. Apparently, when he was alive there was just about no blacker sheep in his barn than Alice in Wonderland. I've even heard that he was adamantly opposed to doing it yet was talked into it by... someone. And then, of course, chose to host a huge 1-hour television Christmas special in its' honor featuring scripted children begging in excitement to see any footage they could from it. Promotion was insane for this film. Kind of amusing (hard to believe) for a movie Walt had no interest in doing from the getgo. The real history of this movie is that it was an interest Walt had decades before it hit the screen, there was quite an extensive series of shorts devoted strictly to his own version of the character in the 1920's. However, I can see what Walt wouldn't love about this. It's very low on schmaltz and refreshingly heartless (with one exception- the brilliant "Very Good Advice" sequence, just about the only scene in Disney's animated canon that gets my eyes misty every single time; oh, come on- the hammer birds were crying for goodness sake, are you made of stone?). Characterization is somewhat restricted to action but there's a lot of quality quirk and endless fun to be had in what feels like a feature-length version of Dumbo's "Pink Elephants on Parade." Some advice, however: turn down your screen's brightness setting 5-15 clicks. The colors on both the 2004 and 2010 DVD's (not Blu-Ray) are very chalky and don't pop at all. Except a few reds and pinks.




Peter Pan (1953) -

I think it's somewhat hilarious but - so far on this marathon there've actually been some surprises (I've seen these films multiple times before and have had some brand new opinions form) - the worst animated films do seem to be the more offensive ones. I'm actually not talking about the infamous "What Makes the Red Man Red" sequence, although that is certainly Heap Big Stupid. I give most of that content a semi-free pass considering times were different, this is a total work of fiction, and I seriously don't think most children get their stereotypical view of races different than their own through Disney. Since there are SO MANY black, Asian, latino, etc fans. No, the reason I really complained about the gay thing in Cinderella is the sad fact that, even though they don't take the racial stuff seriously, people legitimately do allow these films to help form their opinions of romance, relationships, gender roles, and how to treat women. I wouldn't be me if I somehow ignored the sick tendancy for uptight conservative nutjobs and the religious right to flock to Disney. So, then what is Peter Pan? The movie that not only argues that every woman really wants a boy who never grows up but that they're all jealous shrews who expect their little-man to be faithful to them on first sighting. Every female character in NeverLand is either entirely brainless or violently protective of Peter because they want him for themselves. And the Darling family aren't much better. Without so much as a kiss or hand-holding, Wendy is mad with jealousy over Peter rubbing noses with Tigerlily. Did I miss something? And he's no prize whatsoever. He's the only one who can fight off Captain Hook, therefore: he hero, he get chicks. He's also a sexist jerk who laughs at Wendy being attacked by the mermaids. But, really, with the exception of youngest child Michael, the Lost Boys, and Wendy's mother, every last character in this film is deplorable. Or so annoying, you want to see them murdered violently ("I shall try to be worthy of my post" John comes to mind).

Is the film unsalvagable, though? Not at all. There's some good humor involving Captain Hook and the crocodile, the colors are gorgeous (surprise, surprise), and the music score is beautiful and lush- one of Disney's best (ha, not the songs so much- although I think "Second Star to the Right" - actually a left over from Alice in Wonderland, originally titled "Beyond the Laughing Sky" - is quite good).


Ranking Time:
1. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
2. Alice in Wonderland
3. The Rescuers
4. The Jungle Book
5. 101 Dalmatians
6. Cinderella
7. The Sword in the Stone
8. The Aristocats
9. Robin Hood
10. Peter Pan
11. The Fox and the Hound

Last edited by DVD-fanatic-9; 10-01-2012 at 11:42 AM.
DVD-fanatic-9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright 1999-2014 Horrordvds.com

No text or images from this site may be reprinted or used elsewhere without express consent from Horrordvds.com