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Old 10-07-2013, 03:09 AM   #346
Zombie Dude
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Sorry, dude. But that's like saying my vision is 20/20 until I go to the optometrist.
I have to agree with this. I'm confused though, shouldn't setting your tv to its default settings show the true picture of a disc? I always thought the settings were to adjust the image to personal taste.
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Old 10-07-2013, 03:19 AM   #347
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Default settings always suck - I never understood why manufacturers have such crap settings and what a big difference doing your own settings make - some are better then others and TVs with THX certified setting for movies are pretty good but even those can stand a little tweaking.
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Old 10-07-2013, 03:21 AM   #348
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Sorry, dude. But that's like saying my vision is 20/20 until I go to the optometrist.
But if your eyesight is bad then calibration has even less value, not more.

And people are under the mistaken impression that calibrating a tv makes a vast improvement compared to regular settings changes. The reality is that most people are incapable of distinguishing a difference. Tweek the settings however you like them. Nobody knows your eyes better than you do.

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Old 10-07-2013, 03:39 AM   #349
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Default settings always suck - I never understood why manufacturers have such crap settings and what a big difference doing your own settings make - some are better then others and TVs with THX certified setting for movies are pretty good but even those can stand a little tweaking.
They look good to me on my Panasonic. The only thing I've done is turn off Dynamic mode as it lessens the life of the tv.
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Old 10-07-2013, 04:05 AM   #350
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But if your eyesight is bad then calibration has even less value, not more.

And people are under the mistaken impression that calibrating a tv makes a vast improvement compared to regular settings changes. The reality is that most people are incapable of distinguishing a difference. Tweek the settings however you like them. Nobody knows your eyes better than you do.
I think we're talking about two different things. What I've been talking about is calibrating your TV to confirm it can accurately display what's encoded on a DVD or Blu-ray disc. You're talking about what looks good to you. But while personal preferences are subject to individual tastes, ACCURACY is not. If you don't calibrate your set you won't see what you're intended to see. With films, that's a pretty big deal.

Default TV settings are designed to make football look dazzling in a Best Buy store. That means oversaturated colors and amped up contrast and brightness levels. And those aren't settings that will enable even the most faithful Blu-ray transfer to look the same way on your screen that it would look in a movie theater. Default settings are miles away from accuracy, not inches.

There's nothing wrong with going with what looks good as long as you concede that it could substantially change what you're seeing--and that it will diminish the value of your observations in a factual discussion about the quality of a video transfer.

If this transfer looks substantially different on your TV than the screenshots your settings are inaccurate. So the question becomes, do you care about whether or not your DVD and Blu-ray discs are being displayed accurately or not? And if you don't, why are you insisting that this transfer sucks?

The only way to ensure you're seeing what you should is a thorough calibration. And believe it or not, most test patterns are not subject to routine variations in vision. If someone is partially color blind it would make some tint adjustments very difficult. But black level and contrast test patterns are going to look pretty much the same to anyone with reasonable vision. And those adjustments will have the biggest impact on how faithfully your TV is reproducing the look of film.

I truthfully think you'd be very interested in the calibration process if you give it a chance. If not, I definitely won't push the issue further.
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Old 10-07-2013, 07:11 AM   #351
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I think a lot of you guys are mistaking "calibration" and "customization"

Calibration is a science. It's using those fancy color bars on your Criterion discs to make sure that the color balance of the set is the same as the color balance of the original video source. And this is something that everyone (particularly on film forum) should want to do. Shape22 is right when he points out that the default settings are usually off. Here's a simple page that explains how to use color bars to set your monitor. Granted, most of today's sets don't have "blue only" mode, but you'll get the overall idea.

As for "customization", this is really more about setting the brightness and contrast of your set to work best in whatever your own lighting situation is and whatever the source is. Video games, for example tend to look better with a higher contract than movies do. And again, those default settings are usually set to show off the set in a brightly lit show room.

I'm not saying that everyone needs to adjust their sets, but you all dropped a bunch of money to get those nice big pretty pictures. Why wouldn't you want them to look as good as possible?
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Old 10-07-2013, 12:13 PM   #352
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If I only see a problem with this particular disc then I highly doubt that the problem is a matter of improper tv calibration. It could just a likely be a problem within the blu ray player or a subtle signal change as it passes through the audio receiver. My Salems Lot disc looked horribly washed out for years on a number of tvs I owned until I swapped out the player. It could even be a simple matter of having a defective disc. I just don't think that calibration is the answer when 99.999% of everything else is spot on, and I'm not quite willing to mess up the settings on everything else just in the attempt to make this one look any better.

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Old 10-07-2013, 12:47 PM   #353
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If I only see a problem with this particular disc then I highly doubt that the problem is a matter of improper tv calibration. It could just a likely be a problem within the blu ray player or a subtle signal change as it passes through the audio receiver. My Salems Lot disc looked horribly washed out for years on a number of tvs I owned until I swapped out the player. It could even be a simple matter of having a defective disc. I just don't think that calibration is the answer when 99.999% of everything else is spot on, and I'm not quite willing to mess up the settings on everything else just in the attempt to make this one look any better.
I'm with you on this one. I also don't see the need to fiddle with my settings for every movie I watch. That sounds way too tedious. I haven't had any issues with my setup and its been the same since I bought the tv. Surely fiddling with the settings during each movie you watch isn't going to make the biggest difference, it just becomes personal preference of colours in the end.
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Old 10-07-2013, 02:55 PM   #354
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I'm with you on this one. I also don't see the need to fiddle with my settings for every movie I watch. That sounds way too tedious. I haven't had any issues with my setup and its been the same since I bought the tv. Surely fiddling with the settings during each movie you watch isn't going to make the biggest difference, it just becomes personal preference of colours in the end.
This is actually the complete opposite of what we're suggesting. Once you're calibrated, you're done. At that point you'll have established the correct settings--those that will accurately present what's encoded on your television. Those settings don't change depending upon the film. They are absolute. That's why you use test patterns to arrive at those settings.

There are definitely plenty of poor-quality discs that are too dark, too light, too washed out, or skewed from a color perspective. I don't make adjustments for them for exactly the reason you're citing. It's too much of a pain in the ass. But you can always write down your baseline settings and make baseline adjustments for especially poor-looking discs.

Also don't forget that you only need to calibrate the input for your DVD or Blu-ray player this way. If you like a brighter or more vibrant look for normal TV watching by all means leave the other inputs the way you have them now. But if you want an accurate theatrical look at home you have to calibrate your Blu-ray/DVD inputs.

You almost certainly have some of the Anchor Bay DVDs containing the basic THX calibration tests. Run those patterns. I think the results will interest you.
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Old 10-07-2013, 04:39 PM   #355
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If I want an accurate theatrical look at home all I need to do is to cut the brightness of anything I watch by 30% and get my dog to breathe on the screen. Talk about calibrating, I don't believe that half of the cinemas in this country properly do it, either.
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Old 10-07-2013, 08:04 PM   #356
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I love it when people claim that they saw these movies when they were first released theatrically and actually remember how they looked. Like fuck you. No you fucking don't. Spare us the bullshit because you have no fucking clue what the movie originally looked like when it first came out. Seriously. STFU.

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Old 10-07-2013, 08:19 PM   #357
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Whoa, I thought Canadians were laid back!
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Old 10-07-2013, 08:39 PM   #358
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I love it when people claim that they saw these movies when they were first released theatrically and actually remember how they looked. Like fuck you. No you fucking don't. Spare us the bullshit because you have no fucking clue what the movie originally looked like when it first came out. Seriously. STFU.

~Matt
Amen Matt. Of all the misinformation out there about the original theatrical look of Halloween, this type of info is the most damaging--and the most ridiculous. The Blu-ray.com forums are full of savants who "just know" that the THX transfer is incorrect because they claim perfect recall of what they saw on the screen in 1978. Aren't we fortunate that their neighborhood theaters offered IMAX-caliber projection? And that they can remember exactly how all 125,000+ frames of this film looked?

I guess we should disregard the input of film historians like Lustig and May. The Halloween Rain Men have already weighed in.
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Old 10-07-2013, 10:28 PM   #359
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Old 10-08-2013, 07:05 AM   #360
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This is actually the complete opposite of what we're suggesting. Once you're calibrated, you're done. At that point you'll have established the correct settings--those that will accurately present what's encoded on your television. Those settings don't change depending upon the film. They are absolute. That's why you use test patterns to arrive at those settings.

There are definitely plenty of poor-quality discs that are too dark, too light, too washed out, or skewed from a color perspective. I don't make adjustments for them for exactly the reason you're citing. It's too much of a pain in the ass. But you can always write down your baseline settings and make baseline adjustments for especially poor-looking discs.

Also don't forget that you only need to calibrate the input for your DVD or Blu-ray player this way. If you like a brighter or more vibrant look for normal TV watching by all means leave the other inputs the way you have them now. But if you want an accurate theatrical look at home you have to calibrate your Blu-ray/DVD inputs.

You almost certainly have some of the Anchor Bay DVDs containing the basic THX calibration tests. Run those patterns. I think the results will interest you.
Well that sounds a lot better than what I was saying. Once I set my preferred settings I don't plan to keep fiddling with them that's for sure.
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