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Old 07-02-2013, 07:03 AM   #1
DVD-fanatic-9
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Greatest / Favorite Scenes / Moments in Horror?

What better way to sort of complete the recent trilogy of threads to our favorite horror movies, DVD's, (and) etc(.), than to talk about those moments that made the genre for us?

What scenes and moments in horror do you consider the best, scariest, most interesting, goriest, funniest, sexiest, darkest, and that you think defined the genre? And personally made you keep coming back time and again? (And maybe, if you feel like it, give us a reason.)

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Old 07-02-2013, 08:05 AM   #2
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Suspiria - Opening double murder (and probably my favorite scene of any horror film)
Tenebre - shoplifter's death, double lesbian death, Jane's death (some great kills in this one)
Deep Red - Helga's death
Inferno - Sara & Carlo's death
Opera - Stefano's death, Mira's death (peephole)
Nightmare on Elm Street - Tina's death
Jaws - Chrissie's death
Evil Dead - Shelly's death
Nightmare - double axe murder finale

I'll probably be back to add more. There's too many to recall at once.
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Old 07-02-2013, 08:41 AM   #3
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Off the top of my head. Most of these are iconic but I'll try to be vague so as not to spoil anything:

Horror of Dracula - Christopher Lee's first vampiric appearance with the bloodshot eyes
Exorcist III - the hallway
Evil Dead - the girl banging on the cellar door
Alien - the big reveal of the space jockey
Dunwich Horror - with "creature" moving across the landscape - where all you see is the wind. I know that this was borrowed from a Lewton film, but this was the first time that I saw it as a kid and, lord, did it stick with me
Suspiria - yeah, the opening death
Opera - yeah, the peephole
Peeping Tom - the finale
The Fly - Brundle crawling across the floor
Videodrome - James Woods losing his gun
Texas Chainsaw Massacre - slamming the door
Parents - jumping into bed
Black Christmas - the eye and the door
Night of the Living Dead - the little girl and the trowel
Ringu - great tv reception there
Session 9 - pretty much the whole damned thing - but particularly, listening to tapes in the basement

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Old 07-02-2013, 09:22 AM   #4
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Ok, I'm going to get some shit from you guys for my examples:

House on Haunted Hill (2000) When that drop dead gorgeous blond is looking at the operation performed by ghosts through her camcorder, only to see the doctor and nurses stop what they are doing to look up at her in unison. Holy crap that scared the piss out of me. I still remember how it got to me the first time watching it in the movie theater.

The Innkeepers - Many scenes. The piano, the dream with the ghost sitting up in the bed. The old man at the top of the cellar stairs and then chasing the blonde in the cellar. The main ghost with the blonde in the cellar room at the end of the film.

Insidious - when Darth Maul's face appears behind the main character. Holy crap.

The Sixth Sense - "Hey, you want to see where my dad keeps his gun?" The vomit girl opening Cole's tent. The vomit girl under the bed. The hanging ghosts. The ghost walking past Cole while he is in the bathroom. Cole talking to his mother in the kitchen only to find out that she is not his mother. When Cole is locked into that room at the birthday party. This movie also scared the crap out of me when I saw it in the movies.
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Old 07-02-2013, 09:29 AM   #5
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Sue noticing the rope twitching by her hand and the resulting couple of minutes in Carrie

The police's final call to Carol in the beginning of when A Stranger Calls

Terry going through the files in Doc's office and finding Eddie's in The Howling
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Old 07-02-2013, 09:35 AM   #6
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To name a few:

The Car - what we see through the window during that phone conversation
Dead & Buried - the burn victim in the overturned van
Fatal Attraction - "I'm not gonna be ignored, Dan!"
Halloween - white face fading into view in the doorway
Halloween II - unmoving glass doors can't stop Michael!
Haute Tension - the police watching the surveillance tape at the gas station
Jaws II - "I can't get up!"
Madman - the refrigerator scene
Prince of Darkness - dream transmission
Salem's Lot - night visitor entering through the window
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Old 07-02-2013, 03:26 PM   #7
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The Sender (1982) - Car chase and "1963" sign.
The Witches of Eastwick (1987) - Jane (Susan Sarandon) shopping.
The Sentinel (1977) - Stabbing undead father.
The Beyond (1981) - Silent footsteps flashback.
Dressed to Kill (1980) - Museum and leaving Taxi scene.
Friday the 13th (1980) - Marcie & Jack watching approaching thunderstorm.
Poltergeist (1982) - Ghostly hand coming out of TV in bedroom (LOVE the music in that scene).
Carrie (1976) - The moment the screen splits.
The Exorcist (1973) - All scenes featuring Ellen Burstyn and Jason Miller together. Some great chemistry there.
Rosemary's Baby (1968) - Whenever Mia Farrow says 'He was in "Luther" and "Nobody Loves an Albatross" and a lot of television plays and commercials'.
Possession (1981) - Isabelle Adjani's home movies.
New Nightmare (1994) - Heather Langenkamp's TV interview when Robert Englund appears in full Freddy gear.
The Return of the Living Dead (1985) - Frank telling Freddy the story behind NOTLD.
The Shining (1980) - The walk-through the Overlook.
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Old 07-02-2013, 03:40 PM   #8
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Leatherface jumping out of the record closet in Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2. Just a perfectly constructed jump scare.
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Old 07-02-2013, 04:23 PM   #9
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In no particular order -

Dressed to Kill - the kid outside the window in the rain scene
Evil Dead II - "Who's laughing now?"
Re-animator - giving Meg head
Texas Chainsaw massacre - Leatherface in the road with a chainsaw

(more later)
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Old 07-02-2013, 04:30 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpt hook View Post
leatherface jumping out of the record closet in texas chainsaw massacre 2. Just a perfectly constructed jump scare.
+100





Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988) - The part when Jason kills Melissa with the axe to her head and then proceeds to throw the body behind the TV set.

And (same film) in the basement, when Jason yanks the electrical cord off his neck & tosses it to the ground. Probably the best emotion (pissed off) by the Jason character in any of the Friday films. Even though he looked like a monster, it was a very human reaction.

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Old 07-02-2013, 04:34 PM   #11
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Obviously this will be a spoiler laden thread, so I'm not going to be concerned with spoiler tags.

-Exorcist III: The night hospital nurse scene. Absolutely chilling and one of the screens best scares in my opinion.
-The Mist: The very end scene when the main character realizes he didn't have to do it.
-The Descent: The original European "unrated" ending.
-The Shining: The opening score playing as the family car ascends the mountainous region.
-Scanners: When the woman in the family planning clinic realizes she has been scanned by the unborn child.
-Jaws: When the men are taking a bonding moment telling stories about the scars they wear as badges of courage.

I'm sure there are many more, but I may or may not edit this post later.
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Old 07-02-2013, 05:24 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buck135 View Post
Ok, I'm going to get some shit from you guys for my examples:

House on Haunted Hill (2000)

The Innkeepers
I would defend both of those. So, no shit from me.
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Old 07-02-2013, 05:26 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buck135 View Post
Ok, I'm going to get some shit from you guys for my examples:

House on Haunted Hill (2000) When that drop dead gorgeous blond is looking at the operation performed by ghosts through her camcorder, only to see the doctor and nurses stop what they are doing to look up at her in unison. Holy crap that scared the piss out of me. I still remember how it got to me the first time watching it in the movie theater.

The Innkeepers - Many scenes. The piano, the dream with the ghost sitting up in the bed. The old man at the top of the cellar stairs and then chasing the blonde in the cellar. The main ghost with the blonde in the cellar room at the end of the film.

Insidious - when Darth Maul's face appears behind the main character. Holy crap.

The Sixth Sense - "Hey, you want to see where my dad keeps his gun?" The vomit girl opening Cole's tent. The vomit girl under the bed. The hanging ghosts. The ghost walking past Cole while he is in the bathroom. Cole talking to his mother in the kitchen only to find out that she is not his mother. When Cole is locked into that room at the birthday party. This movie also scared the crap out of me when I saw it in the movies.
As much as I didn't care for House on Haunted Hill as a whole, I thought the ghosts were really well done (the twitch effect). And yes, those Sixth Sense scenes got me when I saw the film back in '98.
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Old 07-02-2013, 05:38 PM   #14
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Zombie: Eye splinter scene
Howling: werewolf transformation
Predator: after Jessie Ventura is killed and they mow down the jungle
Psycho: when you find out Anthony Perkins mother is dead
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Old 07-02-2013, 06:51 PM   #15
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I did a big list a few years ago and here are My All-Time Top 13 Scenes (spoilers likely abound, including for other movies mentioned in the paragraphs):




I think before Scream, horror in the public mind had degraded to being a series of shoddy, graphic kill scenes with chainsaw-wielding masked maniacs chasing scantily-clad women through the woods (this is an image I now have ingrained in my head thanks to the bonus features on New Line's Jason X and Jason Goes to Hell discs) and hacking down doors. I even remember a day when my art class just started spontaneously talking about horror movies and how no one liked them... well, except for one film. Can you guess which? Ah hell, is it any wonder in post-Tarantino America that The Shining would be a little more popular with teenagers than Jaws, Psycho, or The Exorcist? Meanwhile, divorcing all the varying theories on what makes The Shining so durable, the film's essential "Here's Johnny!" scene is kind of horror's sporting instant-replay these days. Thanks to Nicholson's goofy performance. But, like I believe is also the case with Friday the 13th, we collectively decide what the classics are when we're younger, less discerning, and more impressionable- so our imagination views Nicholson as a real life Big Bad Wolf and his nursery-rhyme threats as legitimately terrifying. Meanwhile, what's most impressive is how much this scene really teaches the survival horror of today how you shoot a truly palpable sequence of shock-inducing horror. Especially as each one of his splintering swings brings Duvall closer to losing her mind.




Every time I have gone on record defending this movie, I mention the fact that I saw this with someone who cried during it. Thinking back to when I first saw it, I just might have myself if I'd known what to expect. Of course, I rented an edited VHS in high school when I was even more insensitive than I am now and watched it on a very large TV screen in a room with a glass wall behind me showing everything that was happening to anyone who might have walked by. To say the least, I don't think I gave the movie a fair shot. Though one viewing is all it takes to see how aesthetically superior it is to anything to come out in the Martyrs millennium. You can't polish torture, rape, and murder (unless you're Argento, and he was still working on a lower budget). So, like Tobe Hooper and Romero, Craven cites war, economic woes, and domestic issues as influences for the film's rawness but the Mari character's mother has the most telling line: "I think it's crazy. All that blood and violence, I thought you were supposed to be The Love Generation." I'm sure Mari did too. If you met a guy as harmless as Junior or a girl who seemed to be as friendly as Sadie on the street, would you honestly assume they were both living and traveling with sadistic killers like Krug and Weasel? Or that they could be sadistic killers themselves? (Again showing a far more intelligent thought-process than the remake.) I mean, a lot of people smoke and sell weed. How can you tell who is really dangerous and who's just chilling? This scene is better described as anesthetic to the heart but that's as it should be. Thanks to things like Vietnam, it was pretty clear the 60's were dead forever and couldn't be revived by retro fashion and Austin Powers.




My overall opinion of Child's Play has lowered quite a bit over the last few years. For the longest time, I blankly accepted the "fact" that it was an untouchable classic right on the level of Halloween, Dawn of the Dead, and Carrie. I can only point to peer pressure. Although that depends on who you talk to. There actually are a lot of people who saw it, went ehhh, and never looked back because Chucky's just a doll. Why don't you stomp him, kick him away? He'll get the message soon enough and go bug somebody else. In reality, that might just be a viable solution. Though of course, I don't agree with the idea that something small can't be scary or that the human foot is nearly as powerful as people think. Child's Play does all the appropriate legwork in establishing this all happening to believable if not especially likable characters. But, while 90% of the movie falls just about dead flat for me now, there's still one moment that hasn't lost a thing. A stellar sort-of short film set right in the middle of the larger, more boring one. And a mini-milestone. While others will choose Poltergeist's disappearing-reappearing clown as superior, this scene has an extra trick up its sleeve in that everyone watching has taken for granted that because the doll was bought in a box already opened- it already had batteries in the back. There's almost no human voice alive that could have made Chucky scarier than his lifeless, programmed doll-factory voice, half-childlike and half-robotic. And the image of that head spinning around with its demented plastic face and freaky red hair summoned up every child's worst nightmares all at once. Even Talky Tina would wet herself!




"Lots of people will rejoice when I'm dead. Who are you?" How many callow soap opera villains would kill for a line like that? Creepshow is a 2-hour long feast of moments this dark, this nasty, this clever, and this delicious. But what makes it advance beyond just playing around, what gives it that ultimate seal of thematic excellence, is that Romero & King really have all the right targets in their sightline. Don't they? Misanthropics, control freaks, back-stabbers, opportunists, domestic abusers, greedy gluts, and the ultimate idiotic consumer / Nielsen test subject (Jordy Verrill needs a modern equivalent in horror for a new movie, I'd love to see Joe Dante get working on that). And it makes perfect sense why the story about bugs was saved for last... because it's a perfect allegory for how all evil seems to start in a real world context: in the delusions of the power hungry that they are untouchable and you are less than a bug to them. Upston Pratt gets a little pleasure from gloating but he crushes fairly indiscriminantly. Which is almost more horrifying. He has a philosophy- that it's not him destroying other peoples' lives, it's their fault for being weak. I'm not sure people like to think about it, but true independence might be just a myth. Sooner or later, everyone has to crawl. So, whether you view Pratt as the ultimate scum embodiment of the corporate takeover or just a guy so smug that he deserves a reminder of just how insignificant he really is, his death couldn't have happened to a "nicer" guy.




The whole of Suspiria's a pretty short story. What you see is exactly what you get. And, after 92 minutes of spectacular, eye-shattering visions, we get nothing less than a masterpiece for a finale. Again what you see - and hear - is what you get but I just want to throw praise on these last few minutes until I have none left. I've never watched a scene with a storm or series of explosions that I replayed as many times or felt the need to immediately turn on the surround and crank up the bass. Before or since. Sure, it's at an unfair advantage happening in this heightened supernatural atmosphere of insane, stylish chaos but just look at how Argento doesn't even risk an IT-type ending with Suzy having to fight off some kind of monster tiger or adventure game stab-out with a demon witch. She uses her intuition, connects the dots, and what happens after that is akin to her hacking into the movie's computer and activating its' self-destruct mechanism. True to form, like the rest of the movie, it's a sight to behold!




This one kind of explains itself but endings that play with expectation (as this whole film does) are pretty golden. I am not a general supporter of the theory that once the monster is dead, the movie's over. Who even came up with that? Anyway, some endings sort of have you expecting that if you linger on the survivors in a too perfect final moment where walking away or sort of drifting to sleep peacefully after a major ordeal is too easy, that something's going to happen. I think we have Carrie to thank for that. Hell Night and Squirm successfully poked the audience slightly at the prospect that there might be a final jump but were already spent. With The Evil Dead... well, I've always thought it's true what they say. That it's so nerve-rattling the first time you see it, I don't see how anyone could expect anything. Or not be reduced to a quivering pile after the previous 82 minutes. But that last shot's pretty fucking awesome, isn't it?! Perfectly set-up with the music and those glorious shots of time restored through the ticking clock and the cabin at dawn, like Ash was a dehydrated wreck walking the desert who'd just found a river. Just... a few more...steps.




Speaking of deserts, that's a good metaphor for the first 100 minutes of Cemetery Man. The horror would seem to come from the realization that the whole world's the same... but I think we can all agree this isn't a scary movie. It doesn't need to be, it still cleverly plays with tone and proves to be an original if not fascinating movie about daily routines as a never-ending living dress rehearsal for death. Even if it's nowhere near the best zombie movie out there, it more than aptly captures the feeling of boredom as the real killer for which fantasy is the only escape ("the only thing that's not shitty is sleep"). Even turning it into something breathtaking as an experience. This scene being the best at doing that. 90's existentialism at its finest; the road ends here. But what a view.




Speaking of tone, the comedy in An American Werewolf in London has rarely been the reason I've considered the film one of the best experiences I've ever had with a horror film. Other than the British influence, objectively a naked guy running through the park wearing balloons then later a woman's coat while people stare and Griffin Dunne's dead-hopeless pining for "Debbie Kline's body" is barely a step above Jason Lives. It takes awhile but Landis is really into surreal films and that starts paying off big time after the first half hour. Otherwise we'd be hyper-focused on waiting for David to change after the right bad moon happened to rise. Before renting the VHS, I kind of expected the film to be a buddy comedy with some light werewolf menace in it. What I got instead, what I sat through that first time was indescribable. If only all first-time viewings of the classics could be like this. David and Jack's immature dialogue had a very pale quality to it, maybe because every frame of the movie seemed to be spilling coat after coat of icy white paint over the characters' red and pink faces. Which I chalked up to being the movie's effort to remind us that's it very cold outside. And that entirely colors the characters' random activities inside. All this is what fascinated me initially (given that I personally spent a great deal of my childhood in extremely cold climates and I remember being a lot more fond of that than the summers). But, given even more time and space, the movie shows us just what it can do with molding comedy and horror together. The image alone of a half dozen casual conversationalists in a theater caked in fresh blood brainstorming methods for David to kill himself is incredible. As an added bonus, we get the world's most absurd porn. I would actually watch that too.




Except for that little fucker in Cat o' Nine Tails (a more hastily cobbled together "yeah it's me and here's why" you'll never find), Argento is pretty good at giving us compelling killers. With often heartfelt reasons for why they did it. None moreso than Nina Tobias, if you ask me. A legit life-long victim of profound psychological trauma. And, in typical Argento-versing, totally incurable except by death. And... this may be the most beautiful, sad, tragic, deeply touching, and sympathetic death scene in the history of horrific cinematic moments. I mentioned in another thread that Morricone's "Come Un Madrigale" is giallo's answer to Love Story's haunting, achingly romantic "Snow Frolic" only with trademark Argento childlike vocal twist. Watching her pour her heart out to her intended victim before leaping into her typical Argento Final Destinationy fate (always a supernaturally extraordinary coincidence) goes a long way in humanizing this exceptionally vague, thick film.




If Scarecrows and Demons had been better films, they both had ideas which might have gone on to secure top spots on the list of fears we have because of movies. In this case, I'm talking about post-Alien impregnation by monster where the victim shuffled back undetected among the other survivors who've yet to become victims. But even on their best day, there's nothing more terrifying than the dead look in that Klown's eyes. This shot is the most prolonged exposure we really have to one of the Klowns and the closest we get to psychoanalyzing them. However, before you can ask the same questions Mike and the Tarenzi brothers toss around back and forth, the Klown uses the dead body of John Vernon to fully state his purpose on our planet: to kill. And you just know he means: kill everyone, if possible. A brilliant scene. And one of the most spine-chilling things I've ever seen in my life.




When it comes to iconic moments and images, there's just nothing on a pure horror level that has surpassed the last 7 minutes of Friday the 13th for me. The film has recently been heavily debated on Horror Digital and while I don't agree with the consensus that it has no depth to it whatsoever, I agree that reputation is fair. On one level the film is aimless, and has a lot of time to kill in its 95-minute running total. But from one epic machete chop, the single most identifiable and definitive horror franchise was born. Along with a canoe, some tranquil music, a little ripping off of Carrie, and a zombie/ghost Ari Lehman came a scene that will forever live in infamy. Maniac ripped off Carrie far more deliberately, so: take that everyone who doesn't love these movies. Nothing more to say, this scene really speaks for itself.




Romero and his irony... For me, it's what almost killed Martin. And what ultimately saves The Crazies. The difference being that Martin is probably Romero's best-shot and edited film and The Crazies is a mess. In addition to having characters who aren't very interesting for the first 70 minutes- the editing is a nightmare, it looks pretty crappy, and there is no music to help set a mood. But when Trixie starts eating away at that final group of survivors, things change. First of all, Richard France's performance is easily the movie dynamic thing in the movie. And when he foolishly forgets his gas mask and lab coat after discovering the cure and runs out into the school hallway, the movie tests just how much power it can have. Turns out, it's a lot. Setting a tone of tragedy with this scene, our last couple David and Judy find themselves doomed by the unstoppable disease. And upon realizing that David is the human carrier of the immunity strain the scientists/military are looking for but now has lost everything he had to care for, how can anyone tell that he hasn't "gone crazy"? So when he comes in, they don't bother to test him.




Finally after long last, I think Carrie is becoming one of those movies where everything that could be said about it has been said. But does anyone else sometimes stand back and think, "Wow..." I think one of the traits that marks a truly brutal scene in film is when you don't exactly expect it. This film is so thoroughly compassionate if not empathetic with Carrie and her miserable life that it's very much like they give her a happy ending for all her trouble and make us watch as her spiteful, petty classmates take it away. In a scene where at first... there are maybe only 5 people laughing. Even Edie McClurg's gabby hair-salon bitch Helen seems genuinely mortified and shocked by what she's seeing. But in what may be the most tragic turn of an event in film history, those 5 people were all it took for Carrie to condemn the entire room. And while we all know what happens next, I think it's kind of remarkable that any film about a lowly, put upon person with no voice to command any attention to her suffering suddenly whiplashes with a lion's roar from hell. It's so horrifying that it shouldn't be, but it's almost beautiful that a scene shows us that what people do to 1 person through apathy does make a difference. That one night shouldn't be enough to reverse years worth of damage even if the bucket had never spilled and that if only everyone would treat other people like they were the one being tormented and teased and realize before the harm is done just how devastating it feels. It's not a lot to ask, just think of yourself first. Horror at its heart is kind of about what's wrong with our world. This scene proves conclusively that we can't just bounce back from bullying and oppression.

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