Single Favourite Argento movie - and why!

Discussion in 'Euro Horror' started by Nemesis, Jun 21, 2007.

  1. Nemesis

    Nemesis Guest

    ok, i'm sure this has been done in one fashion or another.. but i'm curious what everyone's favourite Argento flick is.. and i don't want to see anyone saying "it's a tie between XXXXX and XXXXX".. name your one single favourite and explain why it's so enjoyable and memorable to you :)

    for me

    Tenebrae

    I just think that from start to finish this movie has style, some awesome set pieces and one of the best movie scores i've heard in a long time.

    Firstly, it has the doberman scene where a girl is chased half way across the city and into a basement.. which just had me on the edge of my seat "no!! don't do that! don't go in there! no!!! get away!!" etc :)

    secondly it has one of the best long pan i've ever seen where the camera pans up the outside of an apartment building slowly.. into a window.. back outside.. then up onto the roof etc.. it was just magic.. worked very well with the different things that were going on at the same time
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 21, 2007
  2. Opera. I think it's the guy and the knob for hanging up your coat that does it for me. I really like the sets as well.
     
  3. Paff

    Paff Super Moderator

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    Obviously, it's unfair to pick just one movie as they all have some merit, and several are all-time classics. But that's the rule of the thread, so if I HAVE to go with one #1 grand poobah favorite film, it's

    Suspiria

    It doesn't have the mystery and depth that some of his other films have, but the visual sense is unmatched. I do like the plotlines of many of his Gialli, but ultimately it's the visuals that make me an Argento fan, therefore I had to pick his most visual film. The soundtrack is also the best in his career, and the death scenes are more than memorable too. Not to mention the trademark nonsense (why the hell is there a room of barbed wire in a dance studio?) that is enjoyable anyway.
     
  4. Crystal Plumage

    Crystal Plumage Dig me..but don't bury me

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    Been staring at this page for ages.Damn!

    In Ash mode:
    You bastards! Why are you torturing me like this? Why?
     
  5. Copyboy

    Copyboy Well-Known Member

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    AH HA HA HA! Yes! Definitely Suspiria. The visuals, bright colors and music are perfection. I'm not a big fan of a lot of Italian cinema primarily due to their tendency to film without sound and dub everything in afterwards. I find it distracting and annoying as hell to have the American actors' lips mostly in synch but not the Italians'. But Suspiria works. It's beautiful.
     
  6. marcx

    marcx Active Member

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    Really close toss up on suspiria and Deep Red--but i think suspiria edges out...
     
  7. Katatonia

    Katatonia Hellbound Heart

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    Suspiria.

    Perhaps because it was the first Argento film that I ever watched, but probably more due to the overall look and atmosphere of the film itself; and of course the phenomenal music score.
     
  8. satans-sadists

    satans-sadists Ghost

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    My top favorite Argento movie is still Suspiria. I rented this on vhs as a teenager and was instantly hooked. This in turn lead to me discovering more and more Argento.

    As for why I can never shake off Suspiria, I think much of it has to do with watching once late at night while I was sick with an extremely high fever. The music, the psychedelic colors, the surreal production design, all of the stylish murders - everything felt so intensified like never before! I swear that part of me is still haunted by the viewing delirium experience. Lost count years ago how many times I've watched it, but will never forget that one night.

    Argento will always be one of my favorite directors.
     
  9. Devo1313

    Devo1313 New Member

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    Phenomena: Awesome Goblin/Simonetti score,the beautiful Jennifer Connelly,very creepy and eerie atmosphere and lots of fun horror and gore.
     
  10. Mazurka Macabre

    Mazurka Macabre Member

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    Inferno, hands down. I know most people think this is one of Argento's worst, especially when it comes to narrative, but I love it. The film is quite simply a brilliant, flawed gem. It's pure Argento; No one else really fiddled with the script and Argento basically had to fight FOX to get what he wanted.

    It is amazingly dream-like. I'm always finding new and interesting things in it to puzzle over: Who was tearing up floor boards in Elise's apartment? Why, when she is clearly able to, does Mater Tenebrarum refrain from killing Mark? Her speech seems more like an invitation than anything else... Does she even die at the end of the film? (Or was that just some shoddy mise en scene, haha!) What does much of the water and fire imagery mean? (For example: Water is often threatening, yet Mark dreams placidly of the shore!) What's up with the reference to Gurdjieff? What is the significance of the number 49?

    I think Inferno is a very feminist film, and basically condemns women (the witches) who are complicit with patriarchal society (alchemy/ists). It is repeatedly mentioned that Tenebrarum wants "nothing to be changed". (By an anonymous voice and later Varelli himself.) Mater Tenebrarum appears to be a nurturing nurse, but instead she repeatedly destroys the women around her (usually in a passive-agressive manner). Mater Tenebrarum is constantly framed in the film, indicative of her being contained and controlled by the male order - as an object - despite her awesome power. In fact, she chooses to move almost exclusively within these frames! (Some POV shots just outside the house are most likely hers.) She's never seen outside her home, the portrait in the sunken ballroom at beginning, entering the elevator with Varelli, entering her hidden rooms (by the light cast from the open doorway... genius!), as a shadow in the doorway as she watches Mark speak with Varelli, in the reflection of a mirror as mark chases her, and finally culminating with the amazing "broken mirror" finale. This doesn't even include the way in which the shadow killer (as opposed to the cat-eyed killer) is seen through multi-paned windows. The way this figure presses itself up against the glass as Elise watches anticipates the broken mirror finale, where the illusion is swept away to reveal that the frame holds only Death for the women contained within.

    The film also reveals that art and education can triumph over this. Rose is a poet, Mark and Sara are music students. Kazanian is a book keeper. Sara visits a library. (Think of Rose's occupation flippantly described as "particularly suited for women". Deep Red let us known that such silly, laugh-inducing banter from the mouth of a woman could in fact be concealing something important.) These elements deal heavily with the dispersal of knowledge/art and the change it can enable. (Think of Varelli's book, the confessions of an alchemist: who wants it, who wants to conceal and reveal it, the act of reading and of translation, etc.)

    Inferno has some very stylish camera work, especially in the set pieces. (Locking doors during Elise's murder? Hell yes!) The music is all right, although I don't think Emerson had a good handle on how to get the image and sound to work together. I was going to talk more about the film itself, but that feminism rant reallt took it out of me. Haha.
     
  11. 17thJuggalo

    17thJuggalo Active Member

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    I'd say Bird With a Crystal Plumage. Perhaps I'm biased because this is the first film I've seen from him. I love Suspiria, but I find it too slow at times to be my favorite.
     
  12. skmastaz

    skmastaz New Member

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    Easily Deep Red. I think it has the best score of all Argento movies (in fact I was listening to the soundtrack earlier today) and I really liked the story telling and the elevator scene is pretty awesome as well as when they rip off the wallpaper to reveal creepy stuff. Awesome movie, probably one of my favorites ever.
     
  13. DrHerbertWest

    DrHerbertWest For Your Health

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    Tenebre, cuz I feel like it.
     
  14. jefff

    jefff Guest

    Gotta go with Suspiria. Not only is it one of my favorite movies ever (if not my favorite movie ever, period) but it is the film that got me into Argento and Euro-horror in general. As soon as I saw it, I became obsessed and started collecting all of Dario's films. From there, I started discovering all the other amazing Italian filmmakers (Fulci, Bava, etc.) and a new love was born. Watching Suspiria is still an unbeatable and unforgetable expericence, no matter how many times you see it.

    I love all of Dario's films, but Suspiria will forever remain at the top of the list.

    And I do think Inferno is equally as good as Suspiria in it's own right.
     
  15. SaviniFan

    SaviniFan I Have A Fetish

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    Ditto. I love the opening score.
     
  16. othervoice1

    othervoice1 Well-Known Member

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    Suspiria since its one of my favorite horror films period
     
  17. Nemesis

    Nemesis Guest

    Don't think i've forgotten about you CP :) sooner or later you will *have* to decide! :evil:
     
  18. zompirejoe

    zompirejoe Active Member

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    PHENOMENA, very hypnotic movie, great story, great soundtrack, Jennifer Connelly, Donald Pleasance, a chimp with a straight razor, mutant midget killers, maggots, etc.. Seriously though I think it is one of his best works, and I watch it over and over without losing interest. Love Tenebre,Suspiria, and Deep Red but I have to go with this one.
     
  19. hellraiser40

    hellraiser40 Well-Known Member

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    it's strange, but when asked about the best Argento I never get Suspiria or Inferno in my head, it's always Deep Red, Tenebre or Phenomena.

    Deep Red is the best 'classic' giallo of them, Tenebre has the best plot and best cast and Phenomena is the more unique one and has a more emotional core underneath it. Still, I will take Tenebre for now, even though it's damned hard to let the other 2 go!
     
  20. Paff

    Paff Super Moderator

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    By the way, I just wanted to mention that this was a very interesting analysis of Inferno, covering a lot of concepts I'd never considered. I don't know much at all about alchemy, and that's a prominent issue.

    My interest in Inferno is always the "evil architecture". You have hidden passages that are impossible; they're actually larger than the space that contains them. But Argento reveals them so slowly, it becomes believable (the drop of water that eventually reveals the underwater ballroom, and the trail of ants that becomes the internal labyrinth). You also have Sara getting lost in the library, how the exits seem to disappear. Same sort of thing happens in Elise's murder.

    So there's several ways to interpret Inferno. I'm not changing my vote, I just found the topic interesting.
     

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